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sailboat knockdown

How to survive a knock down

With the right sail-set up and an eye to windward, it’s unlikely, but a sudden squall can be all it takes to throw you into a knock down. here’s expert sailing instructor and writer  duncan wells on how to avoid being flattened..

knock down

Knock downs

K nock downs can be caused by the wind when the boat may broach or get caught in a Chinese gybe or if the boat gets caught out by a sudden squall.

Sometimes a boat running before a sea can be given a shove by a wave – and the wind does the rest. A knock down here will be to 90° or less.

Knock downs caused by waves occur when the boat goes beam on to a big sea because a rogue wave catches the helm out and here the knock down will vary and is likely to be greater than 90°.

horizon breeze wind

With the mast well underwater, the boat may right herself, or invert for a time, or indeed roll through 360°.

In the most extreme situations, you can be pitchpoled – turned end over end – but it’s worth saying, before anyone gets put off, that the average weekend cruising is usually a more placid affair!

sailboat knockdown

How to prevent knock downs?

1 Sail smart – in the correct seasons. Ocean Passages for the World (Admiralty) gives you the percentage chance of storms by month.

2 Concentrate when helming. On the crest of a breaking wave, flow of water over the rudder can be reversed leading to loss of control.

3 Don’t allow the boat to become over-pressed. Reef early.

4 Do not allow the boat to go beam on to a sea.

Sailing waves

There are a number of techniques for managing in storms and big seas. Heaving to should put your boat at 45° to the wind and thus you will take the seas on the shoulder.

Lin and Larry Pardey have their para-anchor, which seems to work well on long-keel boats, where you heave to and set a para-anchor on a bridle from the bow and drift downwind in your own ‘slick’.

For those who do not have a long keel or for those who like to run off there is the Jordan Series drogue, deployed from the stern – which will slow you down – 200ft or so of line with 100 small drogues.

Sir Robin Knox-Johnston, in his non-stop round the world voyage aboard Suhaili , deployed 2in (16mm) rope in bights trailed off the stern. This helped to slow him down.

PPL Photo Agency. Robin Knox-Johnston, the first man to sail solo non-stop around the World, aboard his 32ft 5in yacht Suhaili. Credit: Bill Rowntree/PPL 

Then with the storm jib only, sheeted both sides to keep it centred, he kept the bow dead downwind and the stern to the waves and managed to avoid going beam on to the seas.

Of course if you get caught by a rogue wave, there is very little that you can do.

Or you may avoid knock downs only to be caught out as you come screaming down the face of a wave to the bottom of the trough and find yourself turned end over end – pitchpoled.

smeeton

In the case of the most famous pitchpole of all time, caught out by a rogue wave as they approached Cape Horn, Tzu Hang – the Smeeton’s boat – was pitchpoled, dismasted and damaged.

Beryl Smeeton was thrown overboard. She swam back to the boat and managed to get back on board. They effected temporary repairs and under jury rig made their way to port – unaided.

Whatever happens; broach, rolled or pitchpoled, things fly about on deck and inside. It’s worse if the boat is at any point upside down.

Knock downs: Reducing the extent of the damage

  • Have as little on deck as possible and that which is there should be lashed down securely
  • Cockpit lockers need to have latches. The button press type of latches can come undone and so need a securing pin/lanyard to prevent this
  • Washboards need to be able to be secured in place, with a latch or lanyard
  • The companionway hatch needs to be able to be latched
  • Tie up the bunt of a reefed sail so that it cannot fill with water
  • Keep winch handles below decks
  • Safety gear: singlehanded, stow below, if crewed or short-handed keep the essentials, lifebuoys, Oscar sling, Danbuoy firmly secured.
  • Take the outboard motor below decks, wrapped up, tied down, cushioned, or in a locked cockpit locker
  • Masts, rigging etc, are likely to come down. The design of a boat makes a difference to how we fare
  • Anything that can trap water on deck is dangerous
  • Scuppers need plentiful run offs and slots to allow the water to drain away quickly
  • Cockpits need to be able to drain quickly with suitable sized drains

inside sailing boat

Inside the boat, everything will go flying, whether you suffer a knock down, 360° roll or a pitchpole.

This is where you can make the difference; you should always ‘stow for sea’ but above that we can do the following:

  • Floorboards. Boards on the cabin sole need to be able to be locked down with latches. Screwing them down is a faff, latches are best, if more expensive
  • Cookers need to be able to stay in their mountings with the boat inverted. There needs to be a bar across the gimbal to stop the cooker from jumping out
  • Cupboards need to be lockable or need gaffer tape across them in a diagonal or cross shape
  • The head needs to have both inlet and outlet valves shut off in case the force of any slamming allows water through the valves and into the head. Joker valves can be quite leaky
  • Bookshelves need covers so books don’t fall out – nets work for this.  Beds and anything else that could come adrift if the boat were inverted need to have lock down catches on.

If you have been knocked down or rolled and there is water inside, damage on deck and a rig or part of it to cut away, you need to assess which is life threatening and deal with that first.

Remember that the head can be used as a pump to remove water, assuming the level is over the rim of the lavatory bowl. If the level of water has risen above the batteries then the electrics will be out. You need to send any Mayday on the ship radio before this happens.

Nav

Cutting the rig away so it doesn’t damage the boat is important. Bolt cutters are useful here. A screwdriver may be even more useful. If you know you’re going to encounter lightning, then be sure to put all portable electric equipment, handheld VHF, GPS, beacons/locator equipment, laptop, tablet, and so on, into the oven and lock it shut.This acts as a Faraday cage in the event of a lightning strike and protects them.

At the very least, disconnect aerials from VHF radios and GPS.

Thanks to Alex Whitworth, circumnavigator, for his help and to Dave and Angie Jeffs and their tips from 60,000 ocean miles in a Hallberg Rassy 43

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What is a Knockdown in Sailing? Causes and how to avoid it.

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What is a Knockdown in Sailing?

Causes of a knockdown, how to avoid a knockdown, recovering from a knockdown, common scenarios leading to a knockdown, implications for the crew, effective sailing techniques, safety equipment and measures, final thoughts, what is a knockdown in sailing.

A knockdown in sailing is a situation where a sailboat is knocked over to its side, causing the mast to nearly parallel or even touch the water. It's a form of capsizing, but less severe.

What causes a knockdown in sailing?

Knockdowns are primarily caused by two factors: wind and waves. A sudden gust or surge in wind strength can overpower the sails, leading to a knockdown. Similarly, a boat that encounters a wave at the wrong angle can also be rolled over on its side.

How can I avoid a knockdown in sailing?

While it may not always be possible to avoid a knockdown, especially in severe weather conditions, there are measures sailors can take to minimize the risk. One of the key strategies is to reef the sails early, reducing the sail area before the boat becomes overpowered. It's also important to avoid taking waves on the boat’s beam and to maintain careful helming, particularly downwind.

How do I recover from a knockdown?

Recovering from a knockdown depends on the severity of the situation. In less severe cases, easing the sails and allowing the keel’s natural righting momentum to work can quickly right the boat. However, in more severe cases where water has entered the cabin or the sails are keeping the boat on its side, the crew will need to take active measures to aid recovery. This could involve bailing out water, cutting away sails, or even cutting away the mast in extreme cases.

Can a knockdown be dangerous?

Yes, a knockdown can be dangerous, especially in severe weather conditions or when the crew is not prepared to handle the situation. However, understanding what a knockdown is, why it happens, and how to recover from it can significantly enhance safety and confidence while sailing.

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What Is a Sailboat Knockdown? (An In-Depth Guide)

sailboat knockdown

Sailing is an activity enjoyed by many, and its popularity only continues to grow.

However, when the wind and waves pick up, even experienced sailors can find themselves in a precarious situation.

A sailboat knockdown is one of the most dangerous and unpredictable scenarios a sailor can face.

In this in-depth guide, we’ll explore what a sailboat knockdown is, what causes it, the different types of sailboats most vulnerable, and how to prevent and survive a knockdown.

If you’re a sailor looking to stay safe on the seas, this guide is for you.

Table of Contents

Short Answer

A sailboat knockdown is an extreme wind event where the force of the wind is so strong that it causes the boat to be knocked onto its side.

This can be very dangerous and can cause damage to the boat, its crew, and the surrounding area.

It is important to be aware of strong winds and adjust your sailing accordingly to reduce the chances of a knockdown event.

What is a Sailboat Knockdown?

A sailboat knockdown is a sudden and extreme tilt of a sailboat caused by a powerful gust of wind.

The sailboat can tilt so much that it nearly capsizes, or can be left partially or completely upside down.

This is a dangerous situation for both passengers and the boat itself, as it can cause significant injury or even damage the boat.

To understand a sailboat knockdown, it is important to first have a basic understanding of how sailboats work .

Sailboats rely on wind to move them, and the sails are designed to capture the wind and propel the boat forward.

As the wind increases in intensity, so does the sailboat’s speed.

However, when the wind becomes so strong that it exceeds the strength of the boat or its rigging, the boat can be knocked down.

The severity of the knockdown depends on the size and shape of the boat, as well as the strength of the gust.

Smaller sailboats are more susceptible to being knocked down, as they are less stable and have less resistance to strong winds.

Larger sailboats can usually be more stable, but if the wind gust is particularly strong, even a large sailboat can be knocked down.

Additionally, the shape of the sailboat can contribute to the severity of the knockdown.

A sailboat with a broader profile may be more likely to be knocked down than one with a narrow profile.

Knockdowns can be dangerous, as the boat can be tipped so far over that it nearly capsizes, or can be left partially or completely upside down.

This can lead to injuries for passengers on board, as well as damage to the boat itself.

To avoid knockdowns, it is important to be aware of the wind conditions at all times, and be prepared to reduce sail or take other precautions if necessary.

Causes of a Sailboat Knockdown

sailboat knockdown

A sailboat knockdown is caused by a powerful gust of wind that exceeds the strength of the boat or its rigging.

Wind gusts can be caused by sudden changes in the weather, such as a thunderstorm.

Wind shear, which is when the wind speed or direction changes quickly, can also cause a sailboat knockdown.

The size and shape of the boat can also affect the severity of the knockdown.

Stable, wide-hulled boats are less susceptible to a knockdown, while narrow, lightweight boats are more vulnerable.

Additionally, boats with long keels may be more prone to a knockdown than those with a shorter keel.

The amount of sail a boat is carrying can also influence the severity of a knockdown.

If the boat is carrying too much sail, the wind will have more power to push the boat over.

On the other hand, if the boat is not carrying enough sail, the gusts will not have enough power to push it over.

A properly trimmed sail will help to reduce the chances of a knockdown.

The direction of the wind can also affect the severity of a knockdown.

If the wind is coming from the side of the boat, it will be more powerful than if it is coming from behind or in front.

Additionally, if the boat is heeled over too far, the wind will be able to push it over more easily.

This is why it is important to keep the boat at an appropriate angle, especially in strong winds.

Finally, the amount of weight on the boat can also affect the severity of a knockdown.

If the boat is heavily loaded, it will be more vulnerable to a knockdown than a lighter boat.

This is why it is important to watch the weight of the boat and its passengers, especially in strong winds.

Severity of a Sailboat Knockdown

When a sailboat is knocked down, the severity of the incident depends on a number of factors, including the size and shape of the boat, the strength of the gust, and the strength of the boat and its rigging. The bigger and more irregularly shaped the boat is, the more likely it is to be knocked down. Similarly, the stronger the wind gust, the more likely the boat is to be knocked down. The strength of the boat also plays a role: if the boat or its rigging is not strong enough to withstand the gust, then the boat will be knocked down.

The severity of the knockdown also depends on the boats angle of heel.

A boat that is heeled over more than 45 degrees is considered to be in a knockdown; if the boat is heeled over more than 90 degrees, the boat may be partially or completely capsized.

The boat can also be damaged if the boom swings across the deck and strikes the boat or the passengers.

In addition to the size and shape of the boat, the strength of the gust, and the strength of the boat and rigging, the speed of the boat also affects the severity of the knockdown.

A boat that is moving quickly has less time to react to the gust and is more likely to be knocked down than a boat that is moving slowly.

Finally, the experience level of the crew and the type of boat also play a role in the severity of the knockdown.

An experienced crew will be better prepared to deal with the gust and will be less likely to be knocked down than a novice crew.

Similarly, certain types of boats, such as catamarans, are better suited for handling strong gusts than monohulls.

In short, the severity of a sailboat knockdown depends on a number of factors, including the size and shape of the boat, the strength of the gust, the strength of the boat and its rigging, the speed of the boat, and the experience level of the crew.

If a boat is knocked down, it can be dangerous and may cause injury to passengers and damage to the boat.

Types of Sailboats Most Vulnerable to Knockdown

sailboat knockdown

When it comes to sailboat knockdowns, the size, shape, and type of sailboat can make a big difference in the severity of a knockdown.

Long, narrow sailboats with a low center of gravity are typically more stable and more resistant to knockdowns.

On the other hand, wide, shallow sailboats with a high center of gravity are more vulnerable to knockdowns, as they tend to capsize more easily.

Small sailing dinghies are particularly vulnerable to knockdowns, due to their shallow hull and lightweight construction.

Longer keelboats, which have a deeper hull and a longer, more stable keel, are generally better able to resist knockdowns.

Catamarans, which feature two hulls connected by a bridge, are also more resistant to knockdowns, since the two hulls provide additional stability.

Multi-hulled sailboats, such as trimarans and catamarans, are also more resistant to knockdowns, since they have a wider base.

This wider base helps to spread out the force of the wind gust and prevents the boat from tipping over.

Additionally, multi-hulled boats tend to have better balance than monohull sailboats, making them less likely to be knocked down.

Finally, the type of sailboat rigging can also play a role in how susceptible a boat is to a knockdown.

Boats with a Bermudan rig, which has a single mast, are generally more stable in high winds than boats with a gaff rig, which has two masts.

Additionally, boats equipped with a spinnaker, which is a large sail designed for downwind sailing, are more prone to knockdowns due to the extra sail area.

Preventing a Sailboat Knockdown

When it comes to preventing a sailboat knockdown, the key is to be prepared for any situation that could arise.

This includes being aware of the weather and wind conditions, and adjusting the sails and rigging accordingly.

It is also important to stay alert and be aware of any changes in the environment.

If the wind picks up suddenly, it is important to reduce sail and secure the boat to reduce the risk of a knockdown.

If a gust does occur, it is important to be ready to react quickly.

Passengers should be seated and should not move around the boat, as this can unbalance the boat and make it more susceptible to a knockdown.

Lastly, make sure the boat is properly secured before each voyage and that all safety equipment is on board and in good working order.

How to Survive a Sailboat Knockdown

sailboat knockdown

Surviving a sailboat knockdown can be a tricky task, but with the right knowledge and preparation, it is possible to do so.

The key to survival is knowing how to properly react in the moment of a knockdown.

The first step to take during a sailboat knockdown is to stay calm.

It may be natural to panic in such an emergency, but it is important to remain calm and focused in order to make the best decisions.

Once you have calmed yourself, it is time to think about the boat.

The next step is to secure any loose items on board that could become dangerous during the knockdown.

This includes any unsecured equipment, sails, or other items that could become projectiles.

Once the boat is secure, the crew should be instructed to move to the lowest point on the boat.

This will help keep everyone safe and reduce the chances of any injury.

The next step is to prepare for the possibility of the boat capsizing.

This means making sure that everyone is wearing a lifejacket and that the boat is equipped with a flotation device.

If the boat does happen to capsize, it is important to stay with the boat and not try to swim away.

The last step is to make sure the crew is prepared to right the boat if necessary.

This may involve using a spinnaker pole, jib, or other equipment to help right the boat.

The crew should be familiar with the righting process before heading out on the water.

By following these steps, it is possible to survive a sailboat knockdown.

It is important to stay calm, secure the boat, and prepare for the possibility of a capsize.

With the right preparation and knowledge, surviving a sailboat knockdown can be a relatively easy task.

Damage Caused by a Sailboat Knockdown

When a sailboat is knocked down by a powerful gust of wind, the effects can be quite dramatic.

Not only can passengers be thrown around, but the boat itself can suffer significant damage.

Depending on the size and shape of the boat, and the strength of the gust, a knockdown can cause stress on the hull, mast, and rigging that can result in damage or breakage.

The sails can be torn, the masts can be bent or snapped, and the rigging can be stretched beyond its limits.

Additionally, the boat can be pushed or rolled over, causing further damage to the hull.

In extreme cases, a knockdown can cause the boat to capsize or even sink.

Even if a boat survives a knockdown, it may still need extensive repairs before it is seaworthy again.

Final Thoughts

A sailboat knockdown is an extreme and potentially dangerous tilt of a sailboat caused by a powerful gust of wind.

It can range from partially to completely capsizing the boat, and the severity depends on many factors.

Knowing how to prevent and survive a knockdown is key to staying safe and avoiding damage to the boat.

Sailors should pay close attention to the wind and be aware of any sailboat knockdown warnings in their area.

Keeping these tips in mind will help ensure a safe and enjoyable sailing experience.

James Frami

At the age of 15, he and four other friends from his neighborhood constructed their first boat. He has been sailing for almost 30 years and has a wealth of knowledge that he wants to share with others.

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What Is a Sailing Knockdown and Why Does It Happen? Guide

Introduction to the topic.

Imagine gliding across the open water, feeling the wind in your sails and the thrill of the sea beneath you. Sailing is a sport that combines skill, strategy, and a deep connection with nature. However, every sailor knows that the sea can be unpredictable, presenting challenges that test their abilities and knowledge.

One such challenge that sailors may encounter is a knockdown. Whether you’re a seasoned sailor or a beginner, understanding what a knockdown is and how to handle it is crucial for a safe and enjoyable sailing experience.

Understanding knockdowns is not only important for safety but also for skill development. Knowing how to recognize, respond to, and prevent knockdowns will enhance your seamanship, improve your decision-making abilities, and ultimately make you a more confident and competent sailor. So, let’s dive into the world of knockdowns and unravel their significance on the water.

What is a knockdown in sailing?

what is a knockdown in sailing

Definition of a knockdown in sailing 

A knockdown in sailing refers to a sudden and extreme heeling of a sailboat caused by external forces such as strong winds or waves. It is a situation where the boat is tilted at a severe angle, often to the point where the mast may touch or almost touch the water. During a knockdown, the boat is still afloat and has not capsized, but it can be in a highly unstable and potentially dangerous state.

The degree of heeling in a knockdown can vary, ranging from a significant lean to almost being completely on its side. The severity of the knockdown depends on factors such as wind strength, wave conditions, and the boat’s design and stability.

Knockdowns can happen suddenly and unexpectedly, catching sailors off guard. They are more likely to occur during rough weather conditions, when the wind is strong and gusty, or when encountering large waves. The force exerted by the wind or waves on the sails and hull can overpower the boat’s ability to maintain an upright position, leading to a knockdown.

It is essential to understand that a knockdown is different from a capsize. In a knockdown, the boat remains partially or mostly upright, even though it may be at an extreme angle. With proper action and control, a boat can often recover from a knockdown and continue sailing. In contrast, a capsize involves the boat completely overturning, ending up upside down in the water, requiring external intervention to right the vessel.

Sailors must be prepared to handle knockdowns effectively, including knowing how to respond, maintain control, and recover stability. By understanding the nature of knockdowns and their potential risks, sailors can enhance their safety and minimize the adverse effects of these challenging situations.

Let’s see how knockdowns occur and their causes.

Knockdowns in sailing can occur due to various factors and conditions. Understanding these causes is crucial for anticipating and responding to knockdown situations effectively. Here are some common causes of knockdowns:

  • Strong and gusty winds: Sudden and powerful gusts of wind can exert significant force on the sails, overpowering the boat’s ability to maintain balance. As the wind rapidly fills the sails, the boat may heel over rapidly, leading to a knockdown. Gusts are often associated with turbulent weather conditions, such as squalls or thunderstorms.
  • Breaking waves: When sailing in rough seas, particularly in areas with large waves, breaking waves can pose a significant risk of knockdowns. As a breaking wave approaches the boat, it generates tremendous force against the hull, causing the boat to be pushed sideways and destabilized. The impact of multiple breaking waves in succession can further contribute to a knockdown.
  • Improper sail trim: Incorrect sail trim, such as having too much sail area exposed to the wind or improper balance between sails, can increase the vulnerability of a boat to knockdowns. Overpowered sails create excessive heeling forces, making it more challenging to maintain stability.
  • Inadequate reefing: Failure to reef or reduce sail area in high winds can make the boat more prone to knockdowns. When winds increase, it is crucial to reduce the sail area by reefing, which involves reducing the amount of exposed sail to better manage the forces acting on the boat.
  • Poor weight distribution: Uneven weight distribution among crew members or gear can affect the boat’s stability. If weight is concentrated on one side or is not properly balanced, it can contribute to an imbalance and increase the likelihood of a knockdown.
  • Inexperienced or unprepared crew: Lack of experience in handling adverse weather conditions or a crew that is unprepared to react promptly and appropriately to changing conditions can escalate the risk of knockdowns. Skilled seamanship, knowledge of sail handling techniques, and effective communication among the crew are vital to managing potential knockdown situations.

By understanding these causes, sailors can take preventive measures, such as maintaining proper sail trim, reefing in a timely manner, and practicing good weight distribution, to minimize the chances of experiencing a knockdown. Additionally, staying informed about weather conditions and having a sound understanding of boat handling techniques in challenging conditions can greatly enhance safety on the water.

What is the difference between a knockdown and a capsize?

It is essential to distinguish between a knockdown and a capsize in sailing. While both involve a loss of stability, they represent different levels of severity and consequences.

A knockdown occurs when a sailboat is heeled over at an extreme angle due to external forces such as strong winds or waves. In a knockdown, the boat is still afloat, although it may be tilted to the point where the mast or sails may touch or nearly touch the water. Despite the significant heel, the boat has the potential to recover its balance and continue sailing. With proper action and control, a knockdown can often be managed and resolved.

On the other hand, a capsize refers to a complete overturning of the boat, where it ends up upside down or completely submerged in the water. Unlike a knockdown, a capsize generally renders the boat temporarily or permanently incapacitated until it is righted or salvaged. Capsizes pose greater risks to the crew’s safety and require immediate assistance to ensure their well-being.

What are the potential dangers and risks associated with knockdowns?

Knockdowns in sailing can present several dangers and risks that sailors need to be aware of. These include:

  • Crew safety: During a knockdown, crew members can be thrown off balance or even overboard if they are not properly secured. The risk of injuries increases as the boat tilts at an extreme angle, potentially causing crew members to collide with rigging, equipment, or the boat’s structure.
  • Equipment damage: The force of a knockdown can cause damage to various components of the boat, including the rigging, sails, and other equipment. This damage may render certain systems inoperable or require repairs before the boat can safely continue sailing.
  • Loss of control: When a boat experiences a knockdown, it may temporarily lose control and manoeuvrability. The extreme heel angle can make it challenging to steer or adjust sails, potentially leading to further instability and difficulties in recovering from the knockdown.
  • Secondary incidents: A knockdown can create a chain of events, increasing the risk of secondary incidents such as flooding, dismasting, or further loss of control. Water may enter the boat through open hatches or cockpit drains, adding weight and exacerbating the instability caused by the knockdown.

Recognizing the potential dangers and risks associated with knockdowns is crucial for sailors to take appropriate precautions, respond effectively, and minimize the adverse effects of these challenging situations. By practicing proper safety procedures, maintaining good boat handling techniques, and continuously improving their seamanship skills, sailors can mitigate risks and enhance their overall safety on the water.

What are the factors contributing to knockdowns?

what is a knockdown in sailing

Let’s see impact of wind conditions on knockdowns 

Wind conditions play a significant role in the occurrence and severity of knockdowns in sailing. Understanding how wind affects a sailboat’s stability is crucial for anticipating and responding to potential knockdown situations. Here are some key factors related to wind conditions:

  • Wind strength: The strength of the wind directly influences the likelihood of experiencing a knockdown. Stronger winds exert more force on the sails and hull of the boat, increasing the potential for heeling over. As wind speeds increase, the risk of a knockdown becomes more significant, especially if the boat is not properly prepared or adjusted for the prevailing wind conditions.
  • Wind direction: The direction from which the wind is blowing affects how a sailboat responds to the wind and the potential for a knockdown. Be aware of wind shifts or sudden changes in direction, as they can introduce new forces that may catch sailors off guard. Sudden shifts can cause an unexpected surge of wind pressure on the sails, leading to a knockdown if not properly managed.
  • Wind gusts: Gusts are short-lived bursts of stronger wind within a relatively steady wind flow. Gusts can be particularly hazardous, as they can generate sudden and intense heeling forces on the boat. Sailors should be prepared for gusts by anticipating their arrival and adjusting sail trim and balance accordingly. Failure to react promptly to gusts can increase the risk of a knockdown.
  • Wind consistency: The consistency of the wind, or lack thereof, can affect a boat’s stability and vulnerability to knockdowns. In unstable wind conditions with frequent shifts in direction or variations in strength, a sailboat may experience erratic heeling moments. Sailors must be vigilant in such conditions, constantly adjusting their sails and maintaining a balanced stance to prevent sudden knockdowns.

It is crucial for sailors to continuously monitor wind conditions, assess their impact on the boat, and make necessary adjustments to maintain stability. Proper sail trim, reefing in a timely manner, and being alert to changes in wind conditions are essential in mitigating the risk of knockdowns. By understanding the influence of wind on a sailboat’s stability, sailors can anticipate and respond effectively to minimize the occurrence and severity of knockdown situations.

How sail trim and balance affect the likelihood of a knockdown?

Sail trim and balance play a crucial role in maintaining a sailboat’s stability and reducing the likelihood of a knockdown. Proper sail trim refers to adjusting the sails’ position and tension to optimize their efficiency and minimize heeling forces. Balancing the boat involves distributing weight appropriately to achieve optimal stability. Here’s how sail trim and balance impact the likelihood of a knockdown:

  • Overpowered sails: Incorrect sail trim, where the sails are not properly adjusted for the prevailing wind conditions, can lead to excessive heeling forces. Overpowered sails catch more wind, generating greater pressure and heeling the boat over. This imbalance between the boat’s stability and the force exerted by the wind increases the risk of a knockdown. To avoid this, sailors should regularly assess and adjust their sail trim based on wind strength and direction.
  • Proper reefing: Reefing is the process of reducing the sail area to match the wind conditions. Failing to reef in high winds can make the boat more susceptible to knockdowns. With too much sail area exposed, the boat becomes overpowered, leading to increased heeling forces. By reefing in a timely manner, sailors reduce the risk of knockdowns by reducing the sail’s surface area and better managing the forces acting on the boat.
  • Balance between sails: Achieving a balanced configuration between the sails is essential for maintaining stability. Imbalances can lead to an uneven distribution of forces, causing the boat to lean excessively to one side. Sailors should ensure proper coordination between the mainsail and headsail (if applicable) to achieve a balanced and stable stance. Adjustments may involve altering sail trim, changing the headsail size, or using a boom vang to control the mainsail’s shape.
  • Weight distribution: Proper weight distribution among crew members and gear is vital for maintaining balance and stability. Uneven weight distribution can create imbalances, making the boat more prone to heeling and potentially leading to a knockdown. Crew members should be positioned strategically, moving their weight to the windward or leeward side as needed to counterbalance the boat’s heeling forces.

By paying attention to sail trim and balance, sailors can significantly reduce the likelihood of a knockdown. Regularly adjusting sail trim, reefing appropriately, and maintaining a balanced stance contribute to the overall stability and control of the boat. These practices help optimize performance while minimizing the risks associated with excessive heeling and potential knockdowns.

What is the role of boat design and stability in preventing or causing knockdowns?

what is a knockdown in sailing

The design and stability characteristics of a sailboat play a significant role in preventing or causing knockdowns. Boat design factors such as hull shape, ballast, and keel configuration, as well as the overall stability of the vessel, can greatly influence its resistance to knockdowns. Here’s how boat design and stability relate to knockdowns:

  • Hull shape: The shape of a boat’s hull affects its stability and resistance to heeling forces. Boats with wider beams and flatter hull bottoms tend to offer more initial stability, making them less prone to sudden knockdowns. Conversely, boats with narrower beams and deeper V-shaped hulls may be more susceptible to heeling and require careful handling in challenging conditions.
  • Ballast and keel configuration: Ballast is the weight located in the lower part of the boat, typically in the form of a keel. The design and placement of ballast significantly influence a boat’s stability. Sailboats with a heavier ballast and a lower center of gravity have better stability and resistance to knockdowns. Keel designs, such as fin keels or full keels, also impact stability. Fin keels, with their deeper draft, offer better resistance to heeling forces, while full keels provide enhanced directional stability.
  • Stability index: The stability index of a sailboat measures its ability to resist heeling forces and recover from extreme angles of heel. Sailboats with a higher stability index have a greater resistance to knockdowns. Stability indexes are calculated based on factors such as beam width, ballast, and hull shape. It is important for sailors to understand their boat’s stability characteristics and how they relate to potential knockdown situations.
  • Center of effort and lateral resistance: The position of the sail’s center of effort (COE) and the boat’s lateral resistance affect its stability. A sailboat with a high COE or inadequate lateral resistance may be more prone to heeling excessively and experiencing knockdowns. Proper sail trim and balanced design considerations help optimize the relationship between the sail’s power and the boat’s ability to resist heeling forces.

Sailors should be aware of their boat’s design and stability characteristics to better anticipate and manage knockdown risks. Understanding how hull shape, ballast, keel configuration, and stability indexes affect a boat’s behavior in different conditions allows sailors to make informed decisions, adjust sail handling techniques, and adopt a proactive approach to preventing knockdowns. Furthermore, seeking guidance from boat manufacturers, naval architects, or experienced sailors can provide valuable insights into specific boat designs and their capabilities in various sailing environments.

How to recognize and responding to a knockdown?

What are the indicators of an impending knockdown.

Recognizing the signs of an impending knockdown is crucial for taking timely action. Here are some indicators to watch for:

  • Excessive heeling angle: When a sailboat heels beyond a certain angle, it may indicate the potential for a knockdown. This angle varies depending on the boat’s design and stability characteristics. Monitor the boat’s heel and be vigilant for any sudden and extreme increases in heeling angle.
  • Loss of control: Difficulty maintaining course, excessive weather helm, or a sudden change in the boat’s responsiveness to helm inputs can be warning signs of a knockdown. If you find it increasingly challenging to steer the boat or feel a loss of control, it’s essential to be alert to the possibility of a knockdown.
  • Unstable or erratic behaviour: Unpredictable and irregular movements of the boat, such as severe pitching, rolling, or lurching, can indicate the onset of a knockdown. Pay attention to any unusual behavior that deviates from normal sailing conditions.

How to respond when a knockdown occurs?

When a knockdown occurs, it is vital to respond quickly and effectively to minimize its impact and ensure the safety of the crew. Here are the steps to take:

  • Release or ease sails: Immediately release or ease the sails by releasing the sheets or depowering the sails. This reduces the heeling forces and helps prevent further instability.
  • Maintain control: Hold on to the boat’s steering mechanism or tiller and try to maintain some level of control over the boat. This can help prevent broaching or spinning out of control.
  • Communicate and brace: Inform the crew about the knockdown and ensure everyone is prepared. Crew members should secure themselves and brace against a solid part of the boat to avoid injury.
  • Assist recovery: Once the initial heeling subsides, work together to recover from the knockdown. Follow proper procedures to bring the boat back to an upright position. This may involve releasing or trimming sails, shifting crew weight, or using a combination of techniques depending on the boat’s design and stability.

What are the safety precautions and equipment to consider during a knockdown?

During a knockdown, it is essential to prioritize safety. Consider the following precautions and equipment:

  • Personal safety gear: Ensure that all crew members are wearing personal flotation devices (PFDs) or life jackets. This provides buoyancy and enhances safety in case of an unexpected fall or prolonged immersion.
  • Lifelines and jacklines: Lifelines and jacklines should be in place and properly secured to provide a physical barrier and prevent crew members from falling overboard during a knockdown.
  • Emergency equipment: Have essential emergency equipment readily accessible, such as throwable flotation devices, signaling devices (e.g., flares, whistle), and a reliable means of communication (e.g., VHF radio ).
  • Drogues or sea anchors: Consider deploying a drogue or sea anchor, if available, to provide additional drag and stability during a knockdown. These devices can help minimize the boat’s drift and maintain a controlled orientation relative to the wind and waves.

Few tips for staying calm and maintaining control in a knockdown situation.

Staying calm and maintaining control during a knockdown is vital for a safe recovery. Here are some tips:

  • Focus on maintaining balance: Keep your center of gravity low and distribute your weight to stabilize yourself and the boat. This helps prevent further heeling and maintains control.
  • Communicate effectively: Maintain clear and concise communication with the crew. Coordinate actions and assign roles to ensure a coordinated and efficient response.
  • Avoid sudden movements: Minimize unnecessary movements that may destabilize the boat further. Move deliberately and purposefully to maintain stability.
  • Trust the boat and its design: Sailboats are designed to handle challenging conditions. Have confidence in your boat’s stability and the principles of sailboat design.
  • Learn from the experience: After a knockdown, take the opportunity to debrief and discuss the event with the crew. Identify lessons learned and areas for improvement to enhance your sailing skills and knowledge.

By recognizing the indicators of a knockdown, responding appropriately, prioritizing safety, and staying calm, sailors can navigate through a knockdown situation with greater control and ensure the safety of the crew. Remember, maintaining situational awareness and adhering to good seamanship practices are fundamental in minimizing the risks associated with knockdowns.

How to prevent Knockdowns in sailing?

what is a knockdown in sailing

What are the essential sailing techniques for preventing knockdowns?

Preventing knockdowns begins with employing essential sailing techniques that promote stability and control. Here are some key techniques to consider:

  • Reefing: Reefing involves reducing the sail area by partially or fully lowering the sails. This technique is crucial in high winds or gusty conditions. By reefing early, you reduce the heeling forces and maintain better control over the boat. Familiarize yourself with your boat’s reefing system and practice reefing maneuvers to ensure proficiency when needed.
  • Depowering sails: Understanding how to depower your sails is essential for maintaining control in varying wind conditions. Techniques such as easing the sheets, flattening the sails, and adjusting the angle of attack help reduce the sail’s power and heeling forces. Experiment with different sail trim settings to find the optimal balance between power and stability.

What is the importance of proper sail trim, weight distribution, and crew communication?

Proper sail trim, weight distribution, and crew communication are critical factors in preventing knockdowns. Consider the following:

  • Sail trim: Mastering the art of sail trim is key to optimizing the balance and performance of your boat. Trim the sails to achieve the desired shape and angle of attack for the prevailing wind conditions. Properly trimmed sails promote better stability and reduce the risk of excessive heeling. Experiment with different sail settings and pay attention to changes in wind strength and direction.
  • Weight distribution: Distributing the weight of crew members and gear appropriately helps maintain balance and stability. Encourage crew members to move to windward or leeward as needed to counterbalance the heeling forces. Avoid sudden movements that may disrupt the boat’s stability and compromise control.
  • Crew communication: Effective communication among the crew is crucial in preventing knockdowns. Establish clear protocols for sharing information, coordinating maneuvers, and addressing safety concerns. Encourage an open line of communication to promptly address any issues related to sail trim, balance, or changing conditions.

Significance of experience and skill development in preventing knockdowns

Experience and skill development play a vital role in preventing knockdowns. Here’s why:

  • Understanding your boat: Each sailboat has unique characteristics, and becoming intimately familiar with your boat is essential. Spend time sailing in different conditions to gain a deeper understanding of how your boat handles and responds to various wind strengths and sea states.
  • Seamanship skills: Developing seamanship skills, including boat handling, sail trim, and navigation, enhances your ability to anticipate and respond to changing conditions. Seamanship skills enable you to make informed decisions, adapt to challenging situations, and proactively prevent knockdowns.
  • Training and education: Participating in sailing courses, workshops, or training programs can provide valuable insights and guidance on preventing knockdowns. Learn from experienced sailors, instructors, and sailing resources to expand your knowledge base and refine your sailing techniques.
  • Building situational awareness: Developing situational awareness allows you to assess and adapt to changing conditions effectively. Pay attention to weather forecasts, observe wind patterns, and stay attuned to potential hazards. Continuously monitor your boat’s performance, responsiveness, and stability to make informed decisions.

By mastering essential sailing techniques, emphasizing proper sail trim and weight distribution, fostering effective crew communication, and investing in experience and skill development, you enhance your ability to prevent knockdowns. Remember, preventing knockdowns is a continuous learning process, and the more you sail and gain experience, the more proficient you become in handling your boat and ensuring the safety of your crew

Learning from Knockdowns 

The valuable lessons and experiences gained from knockdowns.

Although knockdowns can be challenging and potentially dangerous, they also offer valuable opportunities for learning and growth. Some key lessons and experiences to highlight include:

  • Heightened awareness: Knockdowns serve as powerful reminders of the dynamic and sometimes unpredictable nature of sailing. They heighten your awareness of the forces at play, such as wind, waves, and boat dynamics, fostering a deeper understanding of the environment in which you sail.
  • Resilience and adaptability: Successfully recovering from a knockdown requires resilience and adaptability. You learn to stay calm, make quick decisions, and take appropriate actions to regain control of the boat. These skills can be applied to other challenging situations on the water and in life.
  • Teamwork and communication: The experience of a knockdown reinforces the importance of effective teamwork and communication among the crew. It highlights the need for clear roles, coordinated actions, and efficient communication to mitigate risks and ensure the safety of everyone on board.

How knockdowns can contribute to skill enhancement and seamanship?

Knockdowns, while intimidating, can contribute significantly to skill enhancement and seamanship. Here’s how:

  • Boat handling skills: Recovering from a knockdown requires mastering boat handling techniques. Through practice and experience, you develop the ability to react quickly, maintain control, and execute recovery maneuvers effectively. This enhances your overall boat handling skills.
  • Decision-making under pressure: Knockdowns demand swift decision-making under pressure. The experience teaches you to assess the situation, evaluate options, and choose the best course of action amidst challenging circumstances. This skill translates to improved decision-making abilities in various sailing scenarios.
  • Seamanship knowledge: Dealing with a knockdown exposes you to different aspects of seamanship, such as sail trim, weight distribution, and understanding the limits of your boat’s stability. It deepens your knowledge and appreciation for the principles of seamanship, making you a more well-rounded sailor.

Encourage sailors to debrief and analyze knockdown incidents for future improvement

After experiencing a knockdown, it is essential to debrief and analyze the incident to extract valuable insights for future improvement. Encourage the following:

  • Crew debrief: Gather the crew and discuss the knockdown incident openly and constructively. Encourage crew members to share their observations, concerns, and ideas for improvement. This debriefing process fosters a learning environment and encourages collaborative problem-solving.
  • Identify contributing factors : Analyze the factors that led to the knockdown, such as sail trim, weight distribution, or decision-making. Identify any mistakes or areas for improvement and discuss strategies to mitigate or prevent similar incidents in the future.
  • Adjust strategies and procedures: Based on the lessons learned, adjust your sailing strategies, procedures, and emergency protocols to enhance safety and reduce the risk of knockdowns. Implement changes in sail trim, crew positioning, or communication protocols as necessary.
  • Continuous learning: Emphasize the importance of continuous learning and skill development. Encourage sailors to seek further training, attend seminars or workshops, and learn from experienced sailors. This commitment to ongoing learning helps prevent future knockdowns and promotes overall seamanship.

By recognizing the value of learning from knockdown incidents, sailors can turn these challenging experiences into opportunities for growth and skill enhancement. Through debriefing, analyzing contributing factors, and implementing improvements, sailors can become more proficient, confident, and safety-conscious on the water.

Watch high wind sailing knockdown extreme squall intense heeling sailboat | Video

Conclusion 

Throughout this article, we have explored the concept of knockdowns in sailing, understanding how they occur, the differences between knockdowns and capsizes, and the potential dangers they pose. We have discussed factors contributing to knockdowns, including wind conditions, sail trim, balance, and boat design.

We have also provided insights into recognizing and responding to knockdowns, emphasizing safety precautions and maintaining control during these situations. Additionally, we have highlighted preventive measures, such as proper sail trim, weight distribution, and the significance of experience and skill development in preventing knockdowns. Lastly, we have discussed the valuable lessons learned from knockdowns and the importance of debriefing and continuous learning.

Understanding knockdowns is of utmost importance for the safety and skill development of sailors. By familiarizing ourselves with the causes, indicators, and proper responses to knockdowns, we can enhance our ability to navigate challenging situations and keep ourselves and our crew safe. It empowers us to make informed decisions, maintain control over the boat, and mitigate risks associated with knockdowns. Furthermore, by developing the necessary skills and knowledge, we can become more confident and proficient sailors, capable of preventing knockdowns and enjoying our time on the water to the fullest.

Sailing is a captivating and exhilarating sport that offers endless opportunities for growth, adventure, and connection with the natural world. As sailors, let us embrace the lessons and experiences gained from knockdowns, recognizing them as valuable stepping stones in our journey. Let us continue to learn, practice, and refine our skills, seeking further training and expanding our knowledge. By doing so, we can confidently navigate the waters, savoring the joys of sailing while prioritizing safety and seamanship.

So, hoist your sails, set your course, and embark on the voyage of a lifetime. Explore the wonders of the sea, build lasting memories, and revel in the beauty of sailing. May the wind be at your back, and may you always sail with skill, passion, and a spirit of adventure.

Share  What Is a Sailing Knockdown and Why Does It Happen? Guide  with your friends and Leave a comment below with your thoughts.

Read  Trim Gauge Not Working on Boat – Reasons with Guide to Fix  until we meet in the next article.

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02-09-2010, 07:16  
Boat: Cal 28 "Happy Days"
to in my , I got to experience my first knock down.

A buddy and myself were sailing more or less south with about 15kts steadily blowing from dead astern. Sailing on the backs of the swells, wing and wing with a 150 Genny, making 6kts over ground even while towing an 11' Whaler. We kept this course for almost 80 miles of the 150 mile crossing.

About 0200, we changed watch, with my buddy Bill going below for some rest. It was a dark, overcast no moon kind of night, but the and waves were about the same as we had all day. With no warning... I MEAN NO WARNING, no , no freshening , no slight chill in the air... NOTHING, we caught 60+kts slightly abaft of the port beam (genny was stb).

In an instant, the tip of the was under , every loose item was flying to the lee in the including Bill. The in wasn't righting as the genny was full of about 5000 gallons of water! The had swung to the lee and was in the drink as well. Unable to release the Genny sheet due to tension, I cut it about 6' from the clew. Well, lemme tell you, a line under that much tension explosively when just TOUCHED with a blade and a will right VERY fast once the sail full of is released!

Bill was just coming up the (well at least he was climbing over the cabinetry that was now the sole) when the righted.... he went flying below again. The pointed to the wind all by herself and as we stabilized we found a wildly whipping 150 can be a new hazard all of its own. There was so much tension just from the wind on the unrestrained sail that we parted the line trying to reef the sail. The stows in a boom... same problem!

Bill took the as I donned a harness and life jacket to go forward and pull down the Genny. THE HARNESS SAVED MY LIFE as the boat pitched in the now 6' seas on the beam and I got tossed THROUGH the . Bill was trying to start the , but (we found out later) the gunk of 25 years on the bottom of the tank was now in the lines. With just the flapping , Bill was able to get her pointed upwind, although making way BACKWARDS. I was able to pull myself over the rail back on when the bow dove into a wave. Bill was yelling to cut the sail, but it was too new, and I was too . I "climbed" the sail and pulled it down, but due to the bow so much water, I didn't dare to open the to stuff it below. I always tie off a few hanks of line on the foredeck when , and was able to use them to secure the sail on .

Unbeknownst to me, Bill was trying to sheet in the main a bit to get some (communication was impossible due to the wind and rain), as I was attempting to toss out a . The boat made way, and the fouled on the and prop.... not good! I then cut the small line holding the main letting it go as bill slacked the main sheet.. at least we were getting on the same page now.

300' of out, the grabbed and we cleated it off..... and it was holding! We climbed the mainsail and lashed it to the boom. The was flopping around because the hydraulic failed. I thought we were going to loose the rig it was so violent! I ran forward and grabbed the and brought it back to the stern cleat to make a temporary backstay.

It seemed like days, but only 30 minutes had elapsed, and we were about as tired as two old can be. With things static for now, we went below to rest and get out of the . Mind you, we were anchored in 60 feet of water with 300' of , in 6 foot seas.... it was not fun! As the adrenalin subsided, the sea-sickness and pain increased. I looked like I was in a fight with a cheese grater from the non-skid, I had a perfect black & blue line where my back broke the stainless pelican hook on the lifeline, both hands were missing skin from hauling lines and knuckling the non-skid. Bill was black & blue all over from his two flying lessons while below... but nothing was broken on either of us, so I guess all was good for now.

Neither of us were prone to motion sickness in the past, and we both have a LOT of time on the water. The first to go was the potato salad Bill ate when first off watch. I never hurled... but that was only due to an empty stomach!

About a day into the 24/7 roller coaster ride, we tried to call for help, only to discover the on the top of the mast, was shorted due to immersion, and (DUH) the in our were long dead. All of the mast mounted nav stuff was dead too. All that was left was the and app in my iPhone!

To shorten a long story, we were 2 days at anchor trying to effect enough to get back underway. It took an hour to do 5 minutes' under those conditions, and the exhaustion and dehydration was debilitating. We could not drink more than a few ounces at a time without it coming up.

We used a cable clamp and one of those nylon ratchet cargo straps to secure the backstay. Tied the that got trashed by the boom back out of the way, and worked to clear the line. About 2200 the second night we had enough repaired that we planned on getting under way at first light the next morning. Up about an hour before daylight, the had subsided to a tolerable level, and we actually were able to eat and drink for the first time in 48 hours.

Mother Nature had other plans.... as the sun was coming up, we see ANOTHER squall line! We went below and went back to sleep. We rocked and rolled for an hour, but after the squall, it was beautiful..... TOO beautiful, as in ZERO wind! We fired up the , and about halfway through anchor recovery, it quit, dead, nada, zippo. The Whaler has a 30 horse, so all's good to use it to get the anchor up. We lashed the dink to the side, kicked it in and got underway... 55 miles to the sea buoy in KW. The dingy flamed out after about 17 miles, and we had decided to keep the last 5 gallons of gas for the .

Now 4 days into a 30 hour crossing, we were becalmed, out of fuel, had a cobbled together rig, no , and were STILL 30 miles from the nearest land. The was pushing us backwards from our , so we dropped the hook.....again. About midnight, we felt the slightest rise and fall of the , and came topside to find 5kts of wind coming right from our heading. We pulled the anchor by hand, and got underway with a whopping 1kt SOG 45 degrees off our intended course. 24 hours later, we dropped anchor 2 miles off the NW bell..... WE HAD CELL SERVICE!

After waking up a few frantic friends who were about to report us overdue, we bedded down to wait for daylight. The next morning had light and variable winds of 10-15kts... again directly from our intended course! We threw in the towel and called TowBoat/US!

Lessons Learned: have dirty ... have them cleaned! and communication systems at hand even in calm weather... INCLUDING gloves, shoes, knee pads & ALWAYS WEAR a KNIFE! harness at all times on deck .... ESPECIALLY often overlooked things like a roller line! in your EPIRB/SPOT/Handhelds directly (Bypassing the ENTIRE normal fuel system)
02-09-2010, 07:51  
Boat: Stormwind 40 cutter rigged steel ketch
02-09-2010, 08:00  
to cut the new sail away :-)

Full agreement on lessons learned. Toss in a reef at night and get ready. 9/10 you can fly full no problem but man is that 1/10 time going to be bad. Even if it's not a pitchpole thing, the poor guy who went to has to get back up.
02-09-2010, 08:03  
Boat: cape dory 30 MKII
winds?? there's something about 150% genoas that worry me .. especially at night. rather be flying a working and going slow.
02-09-2010, 08:06  
Boat: Southern Cross 35' Cutter - FrPol & H-boat 26' - Sweden
for thought there.... how often haven't most of us broken a few of those prudent rules.

from my own experience I definetely agree on reefing down before nightfall in most cases. And I never tend to fly a chute at night. Or maybe I should say almost never
Do it today-tomorrow it could be too late!
02-09-2010, 08:11  
winds??
02-09-2010, 08:24  
Boat: Now boatless :-(
. Especially the zero wind post frontal experience.

I hate to ask but did you get a weather brief ahead of time? <--- Click

02-09-2010, 08:29  
Boat: Cal 20
for or main or did it just point up specific items?
A house is but a boat so poorly built and so firmly run aground no one would think to try and refloat it.
02-09-2010, 08:42  
Boat: Southern Cross 35' Cutter - FrPol & H-boat 26' - Sweden
items?
02-09-2010, 09:01  
02-09-2010, 09:14  
Boat: Beneteau First 42
several yachts ahead and behind us had major problems including a sizable out of YC that was knocked down a full 90º (she later pulled into Key West with seaweed stuck in her spreaders). During that passage we tracked no fewer than 5 squalls on the at one time and were able to avoid all but one that I swear moved to windward to catch us. We only got the edge, but had 40+ knots over the deck at one point.

While your experience was tramatic, you survived and got a heck of an education, eh? Moreover, you still have the boat (and the 28's a peach). Had your worked its likely you'd have been picked up but the yacht , given the CG will not tow a damaged yacht any longer.

Given our experience with that stretch of water, at this point, unless there is a very good moon, once the sun goes down we always tuck in the first reef and roll the genny up until it can't overlap the shrouds. We also adjust the course so that we don't need a pole to hold the genny in place, even if that means heading off the rhumb line somewhat. Although some might disagree with the practice, we also don't secure the to but keep them in the self tailers with an extra "safety wrap" so they can be spun off the winches in a heart-beat. Lastly, if we are hit, we run off, down wind, to take the load off the headsail so it can be furled entirely. Lastly, we always wear harnesses and keep clipped on to the yacht, even though they can be a pain in the neck and sometimes seem unnecessary.

FWIW I have found the first warning that bad stuff may be coming is the wind suddenly feeling cool. That seems to mean you've only got minutes to act.

N'any case, best wishes for less exciting trips in the future, eh?
02-09-2010, 09:52  
02-09-2010, 09:55  
Boat: Cal 28 "Happy Days"
to but keep them in the self tailers with an extra "safety wrap" so they can be spun off the winches in a heart-beat
02-09-2010, 11:12  
Boat: 1968 Alberg 30 #329

KK4GGF
02-09-2010, 11:17  
Boat: Leopard Catamaran
 
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sailboat knockdown

How Often Do Sailboats Capsize? (Explained For Beginners)

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When you go out sailing, your boat will heel to one side, or sometimes back and forth to both sides if you are running downwind.

The more wind, the more you will heel.

So how often does a sailboat actually capsize?

Here’s how often sailboats capsize:

In dinghy sailing, it is not uncommon to capsize. It is far less common for larger keelboats which can be very difficult or impossible to recover from. A capsize in a keelboat is almost always a serious issue and may require outside assistance.

Table of Contents

sailboat knockdown

Different Types of Capsizing:

For sailboats, there are two kinds of capsizes:

The Knockdown:

The first is a knockdown, often called a flip in dinghies.

A knockdown is when your boat is knocked over 90 degrees, to where the mast and sails are touching the water.

Dinghies can recover from a knockdown fairly easily. One (sometimes more) of the crew stands on the centerboard, and their weight levers the boat back into an upright position.

Recovering a small catamaran is done similarly, though it often requires a line from the upper hull to get proper leverage.

For keelboats, the situation is much different in a knockdown. Most will start to the right themselves when the crew gets to the high side, but if water gets into the interior and continues to pour in, the boat may not right by itself and require outside assistance.

The Turtle:

The other kind of capsize is called a turtle, where the boat is complete upside down.

A dinghy (and small catamaran) can still recover from this under most circumstances, again by leveraging against the centerboard until 90 degrees and then until upright.

A keelboat that turtles will require outside assistance to right itself.

You may need outside assistance with large multi-hulls as well.

Can All Sailboats Capsize in a Strong Wind?

The simple truth here is yes.

No matter its size and design, any sailboat is susceptible to capsizing if the wind gets strong enough.

Every boat that has ever been manufactured can capsize in certain conditions, such as hurricane-force winds. Still, sailboats are particularly susceptible to capsizing in strong winds by their very nature.

This is why sailors will reef their sails in higher winds. Reefing sails reduce the sail area to slow you down and prevent being pulled by the wind.

There are usually two places of reinforcement (sometimes three or even four on certain distance cruising boats) that may be lowered to create a smaller sail on the mainsails. This reduced sail area decreases the pressure on the sails and makes the boat easier to handle and more upright in higher winds.

In the worst weather, sailors will usually lower their sails completely and throw out a sea anchor. This device is deployed off the bow and keeps the boat pointing into the wind and waves to not get spun sideways to the waves and capsize.

What Types of Sailboats Capsize the Most?

Dinghies are the smallest sailboats and are more susceptible to capsizing than other kinds of sailboats, like yachts or catamarans.

It is almost expected that you will flip your dinghy at some point during a sail, and it is not particularly difficult to recover from. The main problems would be if the crew is exhausted, as climbing up on the centerboard requires some strength and damage to the sails or rigging.

For example, in collegiate sailing races can be run in high winds, and many races are packed into a single day. A crew that flips late in the day may be too exhausted to the right their boat, which is why many powerboats are usually on standby to help.

Damage to the rigging may prevent a boat from righting, for example, if the mast is bent or, in more extreme circumstances, the boat is dismasted.

A damaged sail may also wrap around the rigging and remain filled with water, making a recovery more difficult.

Are Sailboats More Likely to Capsize than other Boats?

Because sailboats heel to one side as the wind moves them, they are always closer to being capsized than any other kind of boat.

However, most sailboats are designed with ultimate stability in mind. The more they heel, the more stable they actually become because of the designed shape and displacement of the hull.

Catamarans are the opposite here.

They have great initial stability because they are on such a wide plain. Even when they fly a hull (one hull out of the water), they are still pretty stable.

Catamarans have poor ultimate stability. The angle of heel they cannot recover from is not as favorable as monohulls, even if it takes them longer to get there because of their initial stability.

Other boats do not heel as a normal part of their operation, so they are less likely in general to capsize than sailboats. That being said, some hull designs have been poor on larger merchant ships, and they lack ultimate stability.

The history of the sea has demonstrated that many vessels have had a point of no return that they could not recover from.

How Do you Prevent Your Boat from Capsizing?

There are several ways to prevent capsizing.

The first is to let out your sails, dumping all the power. Letting out your sails is a standard thing to do when sailing in heavy air.

The power generated by the trimmed-in sails causes the boat to heel, so dumping the power will almost always cause the boat to the right itself if you are heeling too far.

If you are sailing in heavy air, you may find yourself doing this over and over, but it is often a necessary and prudent thing to do.

You can also sail under a reduced sail area.

We already mentioned reefing your sails. When they see bad weather on the horizon, most sailors will reef their sails before the heavier winds reach them, as it is best to be prepared rather than acting when it is already upon you.

You can also put up a smaller headsail. Most boats carry a jib (a small area, usually less than the area of the boat’s foretriangle) or even a storm jib (a much smaller sail, usually with enough area for directional stability but not enough to generate power).

The final option, as mentioned earlier, is to take down all of your sails and throw out a sea anchor if you are offshore or a regular anchor with a lot of lines if you are along the coast or in a bay.

Taking down your sails keeps your bow pointed into the wind. Otherwise, your boat may be buffeted sideways to the large waves, and capsizing becomes a higher probability.

Should I be Worried About Capsizing With my Sailboat?

If you are inexperienced, it is absolutely an issue, especially in a dinghy, where capsizing is easy.

But capsizing in a dinghy is the best way to build experience and confidence to handle it when it occurs.

Capsizing a keelboat is far less common, but it is still something you should be concerned with for the beginner. The first time you have your keelboat out in heavy air, and she starts to heel over. This can induce a little panic.

Knowing how to deal with the rough weather will enable you to keep a cooler head and stay focused, and with experience, you will lose any unreasonable worries about capsizing.

Most experienced sailors will tell you that it is better to prepare as if you are worried. Overconfidence can lead to being unprepared when foul weather hits your boat.

Final Thoughts

Capsizing is a part of sailing in the smaller dinghies and an ever-present possibility in keelboats.

Preventing it is usually within most sailors’ ability, but when it happens, knowing how to deal with it is paramount.

Experience is the best teacher here, in dinghies and yachts, but educating yourself with articles and videos can prepare you to a large degree, as well.

Capsizing – Wikipedia

Heavy Weather Sailing – Yachting Monthly

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Definition of Knockdown?

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I've read/heard of knock downs but never experienced one...unless: I was sailing Lake Texoma on my Islander 30 this weekend (as usual) which had some quirky winds from the east/southeast. Heading north hugging the east shore where the channel is I was on a starboard fore-beam reach with winds about 15 (less than 20 as there were no whitecaps) a gust almost dipped the rail but not quite and I instictively headed up to take advantage of the blow with full main and genoa flying. The wind strengthened and dipped the rail to the enthusiasm of my First Mate Barbara (we had only buried the rail once before on this boat...unlike the regular routine on the J24 we used to sail). The boat then dipped further and white water on the rail turned to green water on the rail to white water over the coaming and into the cockpit dowsing my aft portside stern mounted speaker. Vanishing Point got a little squirrely feeling momentarily as though she was trying to spin on her side to starboard as everything starboard side in the cabin crashed accross the cabin sole. This lasted all of 5 seconds or less as I corrected to port and she stood back up and sailed on as if nothing had happened on a steady beam. As Barb and I continued to feel our quickened pulses and laugh in amazement listening to the garbled water soaked speaker we noted the bottom 12" of foresail was also wet and had obviously dipped. So, does this qualify as a knockdown? I've heard a knockdown is when the mast hits the water (though I'm not sure if this is meant literally) and I know the spreaders didn't touch. Also, was the side spin feeling the start of what I've heard as a broach? I want to put this one in the log book, especially if it qualifies as a knockdown (not something you're suppose to strive for I suppose...but worthy of documentation).  

to me a knock down is at least a spreader getting wet. a broach is rudder out of the water, and boat turning up real hard and fast, often getting the spreaders wet again  

sailboat knockdown

I always thought a broach is where the bow digs in and the stern passes the keel. I believe it includes a knockdown, but doesn't always start with one.  

sailboat knockdown

That is pitch poling. A broach is when you have boarding seas coming over your broadside. Have had a knockdown in a Catalina 25. The spreader was soaked royally in the water. But she came back up. One of the reasons I don't drink on a boat anymore.  

Thanks...I guess I'll have to settle for green water over the rail and white water over the coaming...neither of which that I care to experience again anytime soon. I can't imagine being over far enough the spreaders or mast touch the water. I could foresee people in the water with that experience. Looking forward to more input/definitions regarding a broach...  

sailboat knockdown

You're right, that's a green water thriller. Paloma has never been completely knocked down - the closest we've ever come was at the begining of a Force 10 storm in Gulf. When the storm hit us full abeam (according to the Coast Guard a cold from moving at 35mph, packing internal winds of 50-60), it knocked us from a 10-15 degree heel to port, through a huge arch all the way over to burying the starboard handrails in the water and filling the sails with water, filling the cockpit with water and drenching the interior. She quickly rounded up into the wind, shaking hundreds of gallons of water over the entire boat. But, even that wasn't a true knock down - just the begining of a 36 hour adventure.  

sailboat knockdown

I wonder if there's an official definition. My personal definition would require the top of the mast to get wet, but I guess I'd settle for the spreaders.  

sailboat knockdown

Santiago - I'd call that a sweet BFS. Stolen and catalogued.  

sailboat knockdown

I'd define a knockdown as any time the boat gets rolled to near 90deg heel - whether by a gust or wind or a large sea, or as the aftermath of a broach when sailing downwind. Generally by then your fins are nearly out or out of the water, no longer effective and, indeed, the spreaders may well be wet. I'd call a broach the result of a spinnaker overpowering the boat, causing the rudder to cavitate resulting in a severe round up, with a resulting knockdown if the wind is still in the kite. "Thumb's" definition of a broach sounds closer to a pitchpole to me.... Any of which ought to qualify for a BFS!!  

Faster said: Any of which ought to qualify for a BFS!! Click to expand...

sailboat knockdown

Knockdown = Mast parallel with the water; Also known as a Knockaroach (I make stuff up as I go)  

sailboat knockdown

I don't have a copy handy, but I want to say that in the post-race survey of the 1979 Fastnet Race, they defined a knock-down as "mast past 90 degrees." I've also done the microburst broach like the OP describes where a strong gust off a thunderstorm knocked us over to where the rudder was out of the water and we took water into the cockpit. It behaved pretty much like a spinnaker broach except that it seemed to go on longer since the jib didn't collapse as quickly. I think that wind-driven knock-downs are also not in a class with wave-driven knockdowns just due to the difference in force--the top of a wave weighs tens of thousands of pounds and transfers momentum much more effectively than air. Having grown up in Dallas and experienced the local weather, though, I can definitely believe that you'd get those sorts of gusts off a storm on Texhoma--I know that I've had my share of gust-induced (as opposed to young-and-stupid-induced) knockdowns and turtling with sunfish, dinghies and hobie cats on Texhoma, Possum Kingdom, and various other lakes in that part of the world.  

Thanks for the responses/input/stories. It was just this last Sunday so I'm still feeling the experience. OK, BFS I believe to be Big Frickin Sail...COOL...I had the racing pulse and the guffaw, but kept the Rebel Yell internal to myself (our wide eyed look at each other said it all though) we looked around and there was only one sailboat in proximity to us. We wondered if they saw it and what they were thinking/saying if they did. But SAR?  

Omatako - I have tee'd up BFS for you. That sounds like a great story that needs to be told!!! Santi - SAR is search and rescue. Never a good day.  

The closest I have come to knockdown is about 45 degrees. Plenty to upset everything in the cabin, but not enough to fill the cockpit with water. I have only sailed 1.5 seasons mind you. I find at 45 degrees, you are standing on the side of the lee side cockpit seating. I don't need to go past that, but I am sure I will. Eric  

sailboat knockdown

My definition is at or about 90 degrees. - CD  

sailboat knockdown

Yes, I would agree with that. Control surfaces like keel and rudder have to be clear of the water...you can't help yourself much until the righting kicks in. It needn't be 90 degrees, but it's a lot more than the 45 degrees you see in a broach. Broach=skid Knockdown=falling over Capsize=tumbling Pitchpole=tumbling end over end. It's the last one that really scares me. Reading what happened to the Smeatons on Tzu Hang in the '50s very nearly put me off ocean sailing.  

Wow Val, I'd never read about the Smeetons and the Tzu Hang before. Holy crap!!! Gotta drop a brief write up I found into the BFS thread. Thanks for the heads-up.  

sailboat knockdown

The Smeatons, not once, but twice in nearly the same location. No EPIRB in those days, so a sailor patched their boat up, and sailed for port with what ever sail they could get up....... i2f  

And Beryl swam back to the boat (now without a coach house or, I believe, masts, with a broken arm! Basically, reading about these two is like reading that the two toughest people in the world met and fell in love.  

Absolutely... for anyone into "ocean survival" tales, their books are required reading. Of interest, too, is that John Guzzwell (of Trekka fame) was along for the ride on one of those trips.  

For me this is what is done when the sh&% hits the fan. You pick yourself up, and get to work. Isabelle Autissier rolled, and came up with a stump of a mast in the Southern Ocean. She rigged the boat, and sailed onto Australia turning down rescue. Intestinal fortitude against the odds that just has to be admired........ i2f  

sailboat knockdown

When sailing my SolCat 18, flying a hull and getting knocked down is part of the sport. I have avoided pitchpoleing which is not very fun.  

sailboat knockdown

The only boat out - AND flying your spin. Yeah baby!  

sold a day sailor about two weeks or so ago. The couple who bought it were very new to sailing and my wife and I took them for a test sail. We were in 18-20 mph winds sailing along with already a good heel all four of us sitting windward. My wife and I saw the gust coming and grabbed ahold of something. They did not and slid down both of them to the leeward side. He was rather a big chap so his extra weight and the fact we were in a gust dipped the rail and we started taking it water. I had dumped the main, but in his slide down to reach for something he had grabbed the main so it would not release. All the while I am hollering for him to let go of the main. He finally did and she righted herself with about 6 inches of water in the cockpit. This was right after he had asked me how many times had I turned it over and I had told him never. Well they laughed about it and bought the boat. Closest I want to come to it.  

sailboat knockdown

I've put Oh Joy's sticks in the water once, once was enough.  

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US4998498A - Knockdown sailboat - Google Patents

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sailboat knockdown

Classifications

  • B — PERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
  • B63 — SHIPS OR OTHER WATERBORNE VESSELS; RELATED EQUIPMENT
  • B63B — SHIPS OR OTHER WATERBORNE VESSELS; EQUIPMENT FOR SHIPPING 
  • B63B7/00 — Collapsible, foldable, inflatable or like vessels
  • B63B7/06 — Collapsible, foldable, inflatable or like vessels having parts of non-rigid material
  • B63B7/08 — Inflatable
  • B63B7/082 — Inflatable having parts of rigid material
  • B63H — MARINE PROPULSION OR STEERING
  • B63H9/00 — Marine propulsion provided directly by wind power
  • B63H9/04 — Marine propulsion provided directly by wind power using sails or like wind-catching surfaces

Definitions

  • the present invention relates to a knockdown sailboat, and more particularly, to a lightweight sailboat kit which can be readily assembled for use and disassembled for portability.
  • a typical solo sailboat such as "Laser”® (registered trade mark of Laser International Holdings (1983) Inc.) or a "Sunfish”® (registered trade mark of A.M.C. Incorporated) has a rigid hull of approximately 14-ft. length and 3.5-ft. beam, which defines the minimum size of the package to which the craft can be reduced even with the possibility of known sectional masts.
  • An aim of the present invention is to provide a knockdown sailboat which can be stowed in a carrying case for transport and could be adapted in two packages for shipping as parcel post under current Canadian Postal Regulations, yet can be assembled to provide a sailcraft of comparable size to a "Laser” or “Sunfish” and which can comfortably accommodate a crew of two.
  • a construction in accordance with the present invention comprises a knockdown sailboat assembly consisting of a package in which is provided at least an inflatable hull adapted to be inflated and provide a sailboat hull.
  • Elongated tubular frame members are adapted to be assembled and connected together and to provide at least a mast foot.
  • Anchoring means are provided for anchoring the tubular frame members to the inflatable hull.
  • Rigging, sectional spars, and sails are also provided in the package which is adapted to be assembled with the tubular frame members to form an operable sailboat.
  • a knockdown sailboat assembly including a container formed by two identical container members. Within the container are a pair of elongated inflatable hull members adapted to form the hulls of a catamaran when inflated. Also provided within the container are longitudinal and lateral, sectional, tubular frame members adapted to be assembled to form a frame. Anchor means are provided for mounting on each hull in order to receive and fix the frame. A telescopic sectional mast is provided in the container adapted to be stepped on the frame and a sectional boom to be connected to the mast.
  • a center board is provided which is adapted to be slidably mounted on the frame, and rudder means is adapted to be pivotally mounted at the stern of the inflatable hulls.
  • Rigging is also provided in the container.
  • the two container members are adapted to be mounted one on each hull and connected to the frame to provide a deck bench on each hull.
  • a sailboat comprising at least an inflated hull.
  • a rigid frame is mounted on the inflatable hull to provide at least a mast foot, and anchor means mounts the frame to the hull.
  • the sailboat is provided with a mast stepped on the frame. Rigging, spars, and sails are arranged to form an operable sailboat.
  • a catamaran having a pair of inflated hulls. At least a longitudinal rigid frame member extends along each hull, and lateral rigid frame members extend between and are connected to the longitudinal frame members to form a frame. Anchoring means are attached to the hulls and are connected to the frame to support the frame on the hulls. A mast is stepped to, and a center board is slidably mounted on, the frame between the hulls. A boom is pivotally connected to the mast and rigging extends between the frame and mast. Rudders are pivotally mounted to the stern ends of the hulls.
  • the present invention provides a novel lightweight sailboat using inflatable hulls and a rigid frame for mounting the spars and rigging to the inflatable hulls.
  • inflatable hulls and sectional spars By providing inflatable hulls and sectional spars, the sailboat can be knocked down into a relatively small package and, in a particular embodiment, can be stowed in a carrying case which can qualify as accompanying luggage on an aircraft, or can be transported in the trunk or at least on a carrying rack of most automobiles.
  • the sailboat can be assembled with relative ease from the kit provided in the carrying case, which would also include a portable air compressor of the type which can be run off an automobile or any 12 volt source.
  • FIG. 1 is a perspective exploded view of a carrying case containing the sailboat kit in accordance with the present invention
  • FIG. 2 is a perspective view of the sailboat in an assembled, ready-to-use, position
  • FIG. 3 is a top plan view of the sailboat shown in FIG. 2;
  • FIG. 4 is a vertical cross-section, taken along line 4--4 of FIG. 3;
  • FIG. 5 is a fragmentary vertical cross-section, taken along line 5--5 of FIG. 3;
  • FIG. 6 is a fragmentary vertical cross-section, taken along line 6--6 of FIG. 3;
  • FIG. 7 is a fragmentary vertical cross-section, taken along line 7--7 of FIG. 3;
  • FIG. 8 is an enlarged detailed cross-section, taken in the same plane as FIG. 7, and showing a specific detail thereof;
  • FIG. 9 is a fragmentary top plan view, partly in cross-section, of only the bottom tray of the carrying case shown in FIG. 1;
  • FIG. 10 is a fragmentary vertical cross-section of the complete carrying case, taken along line 10--10 of FIG. 9;
  • FIG. 11 is a vertical cross-section, taken along line 11--11 of FIG. 9;
  • FIG. 12 is a fragmentary enlarged exploded perspective view of a detail of the present invention.
  • FIG. 13 is an enlarged fragmentary side elevation, partly in cross-section, of a detail of the present invention.
  • FIG. 14 is a longitudinal cross-section of the mast and boom in a telescoped stowed condition
  • FIG. 15 is an end elevation of a lateral frame member in the telescoped spars of FIG. 14 have been stowed;
  • FIG. 16 is a radial cross-section of a telescoped shroud stowed within a telescoped longitudinal frame member which, in turn, is stowed within a lateral frame member;
  • FIG. 17, which is on the same sheet of drawings as FIG. 4, is a radial cross-section, taken along line 17--17 of FIG. 4.
  • FIG. 1 the knockdown sailboat stowed in a carrying case 32 made up of two identical halves 34 and 36 which serve as the tray and lid of the container or carrying case 32. Within the case, and barely perceptible, are stowed the various elements which make up the sailboat 10, as will be described.
  • the sailboat will be described in its fully assembled and rigged condition, after which the knockdown stowed-for-transport condition of the various elements will be described.
  • FIGS. 1 through 4 there is shown an embodiment of the sailboat in the form of a catamaran 10, including inflated hulls 12 and 14.
  • the inflated hulls 12 and 14 are made up of material commonly used in powered inflatable boats which have conventionally been used as life rafts on larger boats and have become a more popular form of motorized transportation.
  • the inflatable hulls 12 and 14 are cylindrical tubes made up of a woven fabric, such as polyester impregnated with a rubber-like material such as PVC. In the present case, the tubes are formed as elongated webs and then closed by electronic welding.
  • Each hull 12 and 14, in the present embodiment is 13 feet in length by 131/2 inches.
  • a further web 13 is welded on the webs before they are closed so as to form a second chamber within the hull for safety purposes.
  • the web 13 need not be an impregnated fabric material but could be a thin PVC membrane.
  • the sailboat includes a rigid frame 16 mounted on the relatively flexible inflatable hulls 12 and 14, and the frame 16 supports the various spars and rigging requirements of a typical catamaran sailboat.
  • a mast 18 is stepped on the frame 16, and a boom 20 is pivotally connected through a universal connection to the mast 18.
  • the boom 20 and mast 18 subtend a sail 22.
  • Rigid spars 28 and 30 extend between the frame 16 and the mast 18.
  • a rudder 24 pivotally mounted thereon and controlled by a common tiller 25 as will be described.
  • a deck 27 in he form of a net extends tautly between the various frame members, and the two carrying case halves 34 and 36 serve as deck benches, as shown in these drawings.
  • the deck benches or carrying case halves 34 and 36 are integrated to the frame 16.
  • a center board 26 is slidably mounted to the frame 16 between the hulls 12 and 14.
  • the bows of the hulls 12 and 14 are provided with bow caps 38a and 38b at the end of the upwardly tapered bows.
  • the bow caps 38a and 38b serve as bumpers in order to protect the material of the hulls.
  • Stern caps 40a and 40b are provided at the respective sterns of the hulls 12 and 14. As seen in FIG. 13 and as will be described later, the stern caps 40a and 40b are made of a relatively hard plastics material and are provided with sleeves 42 for receiving and mounting the respective rudders 24a and 24b.
  • a pair of longitudinal sectional frame members 60 and 62 extend axially of each hull 12 and 14. These frame members 60 and 62 are sectional and are made up of telescoped parts of square cross-section. Each part 60a and 60b and corresponding part 62a and 62b are shown in full extension in FIG. 3 and are locked by locking pins 65, as shown in FIGS. 9 and 11. End caps 61 and 63 are provided to the fore end of longitudinal frame members 60 and 62 respectively and are meant to protect the fabric of the hulls 12 and 14 as well as to press the bows downwardly as the hulls are pressed upwardly by waves against the ends of the frame members 60 and 62.
  • the longitudinal frame members 60 and 62 are connected to each of the hulls 12 and 14 by means of anchor saddles 48a and 48b.
  • anchor saddle 48a is shown, saddling the hull 12.
  • Each of the anchor saddles 48 are anchored to anchor seats 44 welded directly to the outer surface of the hulls at selected positions.
  • anchor saddle 48a there is provided an anchor seat 44 on either side of the hull 12 adapted to receive the ends of the anchor saddle 48a.
  • the connection of the end of the saddle 48 and the anchor seat 44 is a bayonet connection.
  • saddle 48 is provided with a cylindrical projection 50 having diametrically opposed lugs 54.
  • the anchor seat 44 is provided with a female bore 56 having bayonet grooves 52 at an angle to the plane of the lugs 54.
  • the anchor seat 44 must be turned so that the grooves 52 are in the plane of the lugs for engagement therewith and only when the lugs 54 are at the bottom end of the grooves 52 will the anchor seat 44 be allowed to rotate relative to the saddle.
  • the hulls 12 and 14 must be underpressured in order to allow the anchor seat 44 to be manipulated. Since a similar projection 50 is provided at the other end of the saddle adapted to engage a similar anchor plate 44, as shown in FIG.
  • the lateral frame member 58 which has a square tubular cross-section, is adapted to engage and nest in an elongated socket 59 and defined within the saddle 48.
  • a saddle 48b is provided on the hull 14 and is mounted in a similar manner to saddle 48a on hull 12.
  • the lateral frame member 58 will engage a similar socket in the saddle 48b. It is important that these frame connections be made so as to resist torsional forces.
  • the frame provides the stability to the sailboat and must not twist or at least reduce such twist to a minimum. Suffice it to say that the frame must provide the same degree of rigidity and flexibility as the frame of a typical rigid catamaran of similar size.
  • the saddle 48a is also provided with a central bore 67 of square cross-section adapted to receive the frame member 60 and, of course, saddle 48b has a similar bore to receive the frame member 62.
  • the shape of these openings or bores 67 allows the longitudinal frame members 60 and 62 to be rigidly secured relative to the lateral frame member 58 and to be prevented from rotation along its respective axis.
  • the ends of the lateral frame members 58 are tight fitted into the sockets 59 or can be provided with suitable locking devices.
  • a lateral frame member 64 is connected to deck bench members 34 and 36 in a manner similar to frame member 58 in saddles 48a, 48b, as will be described in more detail.
  • a pair of parallel plates 68 and 72 are bolted to the lateral frame members 64 and 58, as shown in FIGS. 3 and 6, for the purpose of slidably mounting the dagger board or center board 26.
  • Longitudinal slots 70 are defined in the plates 68 and 72 in a vertical alignment and serve as the center board well.
  • a lateral frame member 66 extends between the ends of the deck benches 34 and 36 and are connected therewith, as will be described later.
  • frame 16 is made up of lateral frame members 58, 64, and 66 rigidly connected to longitudinal frame members 60 and 62 which, in turn, are anchored to the hulls by anchor seats 44.
  • the deck benches 34 and 36 are, in fact, the carrying case halves and are provided with legs 78, 80, 82, and 84. These legs must be slightly staggered since the two halves 34 and 36 are identically constructed and must nest together.
  • the respective legs 78, 80, 82, and 84 have been provided with subscripts "a" and "b” in FIG. 10 in order to properly identify them. For instance, those legs having subscript "b” are fixed to the floor 74b of the carrying case half 34. Likewise, the legs having subscript "a” are fixed to the base 74a of the carrying case half 36.
  • FIGS. 9 and 11 show the carrying case half 36.
  • the carrying case half 36 has a base 74a and upstanding side walls 76 about the periphery thereof.
  • sockets 90 and 92 molded therein and adapted to receive the ends of the lateral frame members 64 and 66 as previously discussed.
  • the carrying case halves 34, 36 are recessed at 94 and 96 (again raised by subscripts "a" and "b") above each socket 90 and 92.
  • recess 96 there is an angled upward anchor projection 98 which is adapted to receive the ends of the tubular shrouds 28 and 30. Hooks 133 are also provided to anchor the traveller cable 130, as shown in FIG. 2.
  • Each of the legs 78 through 84 have bayonet-like projections at the ends thereof which are adapted to engage in individual anchor seats 44 provided on the hulls 12 and 14 in areas adapted to receive the deck benches 34 and 36.
  • the legs 78, 80, 82, and 84 are likewise mounted to these anchoring seats 44 by keeping the hulls 12 and 14 slightly deflated in order to allow the anchor seats to be slightly deflected to receive the bayonet connections.
  • a typical catamaran net forming the deck 27 is mounted to these frame members 66 and 64 as well as to the longitudinal frame members 60 and 62 which extend within the deck benches 34 and 36, as shown in FIGS. 9 and 11.
  • a sleeve 104 is formed at the edges of the net 27 in order to receive the frame member 60, for instance.
  • the longitudinal frame members 60 and 62 extend within the deck bench members 34 and 36.
  • a bore of square cross-section 86 is provided at the fore of each of the deck benches, and a socket 88 is provided in the aft portion thereof.
  • the deck bench member 36 in this case, provides a rigid structural connection between the longitudinal frame member 60 and the lateral frame members 64 and 66.
  • a plug 100 is provided to be inserted in both openings 86a and 86b when the halves 34 and 36 are together to form the carrying case 32.
  • the mast 18 is stepped in a mast foot 54 in the form of a bracket mounted on the lateral frame member 58.
  • Rigid tubular shrouds 28 and 30 extend from the fore portion of the deck benches 34 and 36 on projections 98a and 98b, shown in FIG. 10.
  • the shrouds 28 and 30 are connected by means of a bracket 33 to the mast 18.
  • Each of the rudders 24a and 24b include rudder blades 106 pivotally connected by means of a pivot bolt and nut 108 into the rudder holder 24 having a pivot pin 110 journalled in the sleeve 42 on the stern cap 40.
  • the rudder includes a board portion to receive the tiller 25.
  • the bore is shown in FIG. 13 and includes a spring locking pin 114 with a leaf spring 116 within the bore of the tiller 25.
  • the tiller 25 has flexible coupling members 134 which allows the tiller 25 to flex as it is being steered.
  • a suitable main sheet 128 passing through pulleys and connected to a flexible cable traveller 130 is also provided.
  • the sailboat is a knockdown sailboat and can be stowed in the carrying case 32.
  • the mast is made of a telescopic sectional tube.
  • the mast has four sections 18a, 18b, 18c, and 18d.
  • Each mast section has a C-clip adapted to engage respective openings in a successive section.
  • the mast is made to be telescoped, as shown in FIG. 14.
  • the mast 18 is of circular cross-section, and each section is prevented from telescoping to the end of the preceding section by dimples 126 provided near the ends of the walls thereof just preceding the C-clips 122.
  • Boom 20 has two telescoping cylindrical tube sections 20a and 20b adapted to be telescoped one within the other and then to be inserted in the telescoped mast sections 18. Thus, the boom and the mast form but one short section to be stowed in the carrying case 32. All of the telescoping sections are chosen to have suitable diameters and clearances. Boom sections 20a and 20b are likewise retained in their extended position by means of C-clips 122.
  • Each longitudinal frame member 60 and 62 is made up of two parts 60a and 60b and parts 62a and 62b, and as previously discussed, are held in an extended position by means of locking pins 65, as shown in FIG. 11. However, when the locking pins are removed, the longitudinal frame members 60 and 62 can be respectively telescoped. For instance, sections 62a and 62b can be telescoped within the lateral frame member 64, as shown in FIG. 16.
  • a spar 30 is made up of three telescoped sections 30a, 30b, and 30c, and these can be telescoped one into the other and then stowed within telescoped sections 64, 62a, and 62b.
  • the shroud sections 30a, 30b, and 30c are provided with C-clip locking devices are shown in the mast and boom.
  • the shroud 28 can be telescoped and fitted into the telescoped longitudinal frame member 60 which, in turn, can be inserted within the lateral frame member 66.
  • the hulls 12 and 14 can be deflated and folded neatly to be inserted into the carrying case 32 along the sail 22.
  • the rudders 24a and 24b as well as the tiller can be knocked down and stowed in the carrying case with the center board and the center board plates 68 and 72.
  • Engineering & Computer Science ( AREA )
  • Chemical & Material Sciences ( AREA )
  • Combustion & Propulsion ( AREA )
  • Mechanical Engineering ( AREA )
  • Ocean & Marine Engineering ( AREA )
  • Life Sciences & Earth Sciences ( AREA )
  • Sustainable Development ( AREA )
  • Sustainable Energy ( AREA )
  • Tents Or Canopies ( AREA )
  • Apparatus Associated With Microorganisms And Enzymes ( AREA )

Description

Claims ( 14 ), priority applications (2).

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US07/376,675 (en) 1989-07-07 1989-07-07 Knockdown sailboat
CA000608283A (en) 1989-07-07 1989-08-14 Knockdown sailboat

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US07/376,675 (en) 1989-07-07 1989-07-07 Knockdown sailboat

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US4998498A true ) 1991-03-12

ID=23485991

Family applications (1).

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US07/376,675 Expired - Fee Related (en) 1989-07-07 1989-07-07 Knockdown sailboat

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US (1) (en)
CA (1) (en)

Cited By (22)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
(en) * 1992-03-19 1993-04-20 Methven Robert W Suitcase boat
(en) * 1992-03-19 1993-11-02 Methven Robert W Suitcase boat
(en) * 1990-10-05 1994-05-24 Kunz Daniel W Car topable catamaran with collapsible frame and universal tiller/rudder-mast daggerboard mounting constructions
(en) * 1993-08-17 1996-01-16 Wonka; Justine Longitudinally extended floats
(en) * 1995-10-06 1997-05-20 R.R. Sail Catamaran
(en) * 1996-01-11 1997-06-24 Brown James W Cross beams for interconnecting boat hulls
(en) * 1995-10-23 1997-07-29 Kasper; Gary A. Collapsible pontoon pedal boat
(en) * 1996-12-10 1998-06-12 Zodiac Int PNEUMATIC BOAT
(en) * 1996-05-17 1998-08-25 Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. System for receiving peripheral device capability information and selectively disabling corresponding processing unit function when the device failing to support such function
(en) * 2001-10-30 2003-05-01 Davis Trent W. End portion for a flexible fluid containment vessel and a method of making the same
(en) * 2001-10-05 2003-06-24 Aqua Sports Technology, Inc. Portable, multi-use water device
(en) 2001-04-11 2004-01-13 Albany International Corp. Spiral formed flexible fluid containment vessel
(en) 2002-08-20 2004-02-17 The Coleman Company, Inc. Pontoon paddle boat
(en) 2001-10-30 2004-04-13 Albany International Corp. Fabric structure for a flexible fluid containment vessel
(en) 2001-04-11 2004-05-25 Albany International Corp. End portions for a flexible fluid containment vessel and a method of making the same
(en) 2001-10-30 2004-12-21 Albany International Corp. Segment formed flexible fluid containment vessel
(en) * 2008-06-30 2009-12-31 Shivkumar Mahadevan Methods and ophthalmic devices used in the treatment of ocular allergies
(en) * 2008-12-23 2010-06-24 Bachmann Helmuth G Universally attachable forward tacking sail rig with canting integrated mast and water foil for all boats
(en) 2003-01-21 2010-08-17 Albany International Corp. Flexible fluid containment vessel featuring a keel-like seam
(en) * 2008-04-17 2013-07-24 Jochum Bierma Dismountable catamaran
(en) * 2012-08-27 2014-02-27 Jun-Jie Hu Fast assembly mechanism and infant seat with the same
(en) 2019-07-05 2019-07-31 Gunter Tannhäuser Telescopic mast for sailboats and ships

Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
(en) * 1968-06-18 1969-10-21 Joel M Wittkamp Sailboat
(en) * 1972-02-18 1974-11-12 H Syfritt Assembly for use in recreational activities
(en) * 1977-07-11 1979-01-30 Popkin John R Knockdown boat with inflatable hull
(en) * 1979-06-07 1981-02-10 Fredric Snyderman Inflatable sailboat
(en) * 1986-08-15 1988-08-30 Daniel Kunz Boat, especially a catamaran, with large deck space and collapsible frame
  • 1989-07-07 US US07/376,675 patent/US4998498A/en not_active Expired - Fee Related
  • 1989-08-14 CA CA000608283A patent/CA1329060C/en not_active Expired - Fee Related

Patent Citations (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
(en) * 1968-06-18 1969-10-21 Joel M Wittkamp Sailboat
(en) * 1972-02-18 1974-11-12 H Syfritt Assembly for use in recreational activities
(en) * 1977-07-11 1979-01-30 Popkin John R Knockdown boat with inflatable hull
(en) * 1979-06-07 1981-02-10 Fredric Snyderman Inflatable sailboat
(en) * 1986-08-15 1988-08-30 Daniel Kunz Boat, especially a catamaran, with large deck space and collapsible frame

Cited By (29)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
(en) * 1990-10-05 1994-05-24 Kunz Daniel W Car topable catamaran with collapsible frame and universal tiller/rudder-mast daggerboard mounting constructions
(en) * 1992-03-19 1993-04-20 Methven Robert W Suitcase boat
(en) * 1992-03-19 1993-11-02 Methven Robert W Suitcase boat
(en) * 1993-08-17 1996-01-16 Wonka; Justine Longitudinally extended floats
(en) * 1995-10-06 1997-05-20 R.R. Sail Catamaran
(en) * 1995-10-23 1997-07-29 Kasper; Gary A. Collapsible pontoon pedal boat
(en) * 1996-01-11 1997-06-24 Brown James W Cross beams for interconnecting boat hulls
(en) * 1996-05-17 1998-08-25 Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. System for receiving peripheral device capability information and selectively disabling corresponding processing unit function when the device failing to support such function
(en) * 1996-12-10 1998-06-12 Zodiac Int PNEUMATIC BOAT
(en) * 1996-12-10 2001-08-16 Zodiac Internat S A Inflatable boat
(en) 2001-04-11 2004-05-25 Albany International Corp. End portions for a flexible fluid containment vessel and a method of making the same
(en) 2001-04-11 2007-12-18 Albany International Corp. Coating for a flexible fluid containment vessel and a method of making the same
(en) 2001-04-11 2004-01-13 Albany International Corp. Spiral formed flexible fluid containment vessel
(en) 2001-04-11 2005-03-01 Albany International Corp. Flexible fluid containment vessel
(en) * 2001-10-05 2003-06-24 Aqua Sports Technology, Inc. Portable, multi-use water device
(en) 2001-10-30 2004-04-13 Albany International Corp. Fabric structure for a flexible fluid containment vessel
(en) 2001-10-30 2006-04-11 Albany International Corp. Segment formed flexible fluid containment vessel
(en) 2001-10-30 2006-09-19 Albany International Corp. End portion for a flexible fluid containment vessel and a method of making the same
(en) * 2001-10-30 2003-05-01 Davis Trent W. End portion for a flexible fluid containment vessel and a method of making the same
(en) 2001-10-30 2004-12-21 Albany International Corp. Segment formed flexible fluid containment vessel
(en) 2002-08-20 2004-02-17 The Coleman Company, Inc. Pontoon paddle boat
(en) 2003-01-21 2010-08-17 Albany International Corp. Flexible fluid containment vessel featuring a keel-like seam
(en) * 2008-04-17 2013-07-24 Jochum Bierma Dismountable catamaran
(en) * 2008-06-30 2009-12-31 Shivkumar Mahadevan Methods and ophthalmic devices used in the treatment of ocular allergies
(en) * 2008-12-23 2010-06-24 Bachmann Helmuth G Universally attachable forward tacking sail rig with canting integrated mast and water foil for all boats
(en) 2008-12-23 2011-11-29 Bachmann Helmuth G Universally attachable forward tacking sail rig with canting integrated mast and water foil for all boats
(en) * 2012-08-27 2014-02-27 Jun-Jie Hu Fast assembly mechanism and infant seat with the same
(en) 2019-07-05 2019-07-31 Gunter Tannhäuser Telescopic mast for sailboats and ships
(en) 2019-07-05 2021-01-14 Tannhaeuser Gunter Telescopic square sail device

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Publication number Publication date
(en) 1994-05-03

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Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

: PLACEMENTS MARENA INC., 355 CORMIER, DRUMMONDVILLE

: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:GALLICHAN, REJEAN;REEL/FRAME:005103/0265

: 19890504

AS Assignment

: GALLICHAN R. & ASS. INC., 745 BOULEVARD ST-JOSEPH,

: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST.;ASSIGNOR:PLACEMENTS MAREMA INC.;REEL/FRAME:005554/0495

: 19901210

FPAY Fee payment

: 4

FPAY Fee payment

: 8

REMI Maintenance fee reminder mailed
LAPS Lapse for failure to pay maintenance fees
STCH Information on status: patent discontinuation

: PATENT EXPIRED DUE TO NONPAYMENT OF MAINTENANCE FEES UNDER 37 CFR 1.362

FP Lapsed due to failure to pay maintenance fee

: 20030312

Smoke billows from fire on Ross Island

  • Updated: Jul. 22, 2024, 10:30 a.m.
  • | Published: Jul. 20, 2024, 5:41 p.m.

sailboat knockdown

  • Maxine Bernstein | The Oregonian/OregonLive

Dark smoke billowed over parts of Portland Saturday afternoon as firefighters worked to attack a fire on Ross Island.

The fire was reported at 4:43 p.m.

Portland firefighters were about to call a second-alarm about 5:30 p.m., as crews sprayed water from fire boats and called in additional crews. By 8:10 p.m., the fire bureau called for a third alarm.

Portland fire shuttled firefighters by fire boat to the island to help knock down the blaze.

Crews on the island found abandoned equipment from Ross Island Sand & Gravel and tractor tires on fire but no structures involved, according to the Portland Fire & Rescue Bureau.

“The heavy black smoke was not because it’s a lot of fire but because of the rubber,” said Katia Minor, a firefighter and bureau spokesperson. “The tires kept reigniting.”

Access to the island was challenging for firefighters. The bureau’s Station 21 fire boat, typically docked near the east end of the Hawthorne Bridge, was by the St. Johns Bridge at the time the fire was reported and not as close, leading to a somewhat delayed response, Minor said.

Battalion Chief Jason Kelly spotted the fire from the Ross Island bridge and served as incident commander, according to Minor.

Firefighters sprayed water on the blaze from turrets on two boats and stretched hard lines from the boat pumps to battle the flames, she said.

The bureau switched out crews as the afternoon wore on, with about 40 firefighters involved.

Crews brought flashlights and food to support the firefighters as they got word the fire was spreading to the west side of the island about 7:30 p.m., according to the bureau. The fire also spread to tree branches and cottonwood on the island, raising some concern about firefighters’ safety, Minor said.

Some videos of crews being shuttled to the island by our marine vessels along with crews working. This Marine Based Land Fire on Ross Island took creative efforts by all crews involved. pic.twitter.com/ulWkbua6fi — Portland Fire & Rescue (@PDXFire) July 21, 2024

A man who lives on a boat on the east side of the island and only gave his name as Bird said the smoke was “so black it blocked the sun out.” He said there are no trespass signs all around the island.

Portland General Electric cut electrical power to the island as firefighters worked to contain the blaze.

As firefighters worked on Ross Island, other city firefighters assisted other agencies working to put out a wild fire on Sauvie Island, according to Minor.

-- Maxine Bernstein covers federal court and criminal justice. Reach her at 503-221-8212, [email protected] , follow her on X @maxoregonian , or on LinkedIn .

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Sailboat Owners Forums

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  • Thread starter fred1diver
  • Start date Sep 5, 2016
  • Forums for All Owners
  • Ask All Sailors

fred1diver

hey everyone, I was wondering what does it take to knock down a sailboat? I'm being overly cautious this year (not sure why) so I'm wondering what it takes to knock a 23 footer trailer sailer down thanks in advance  

Fred, when I had my Catalina 22 I could easily sail on a single reef up to about 27 knots with no big puffs, if we got big puffs it could lay me over if I wasn't really paying attention. My Hunter 23.5 has a lot more sail area and with the water ballast anything above 15-18 knots is starts to feel a bit like it would go in an instant so I usually drop the jib and just use the main. Hope this helps in what you're looking for.  

Head Sail

There was a 22 ft sailboat in a race out here a few years ago. Squall came up with winds in the 20's. Boat was knocked down as I recall and one sailor lost.  

jssailem

SBO Weather and Forecasting Forum Jim & John

Fred. Wave and or wind that over powers the capacity of you boat sit up right on the water.  

Anonymous 121765

Anonymous 121765

Head, That sucks pal. No one should die while enjoying their sport. Fred, Knockdowns happen from a myriad of reasons and/or conditions. The good news, they are few & far-in-between. I got somewhat knocked down twice but, the difference was not from wind/waves but from two Microbursts. These were discovered in the early Seventies with the advent of Doppler Radar. They then were able to determine why planes taking off & landing suddenly crashed. Now, airports check Doppler radar first. Once while under sail & once while motor-sailing & a lone sailor, it happened to me but, there are no witnesses or documented proof that they ever happened but...............they did. Both times, my boat was happy & moving forward albeit at an extreme angle. It was only when the rub rail & cockpit started flooding that really got my attention. When water rushes into your cockpit yea, it WILL get your attention. As for knockdowns, stay away from them. When conditions get spirited & you first question your stability, first of all, shorten sail, maybe motor, maybe change course or, all of the above. Never get caught by surprise man. Remember the adage of the prudent navigator............ Boating is dynamic & in this sense, conditions forever change. Just make sure you also change in time. CR  

LeslieTroyer

LeslieTroyer

When I had my Catalina 22 on the Columbia river - I've sailed reefed main and storm jib in 45+ the windows were under water, spreaders occasionally were dragging in the water, but didn't "knock down". Had to grind winches from the off side as the winches were usually underwater.  

Charlie Jones s/v Tehani

Charlie Jones s/v Tehani

Only been knocked down once. In the 70's I had a San Juan 21, which had one of those dangerous pigtails clips mounted on the back stay to hold the boom up (instead of a proper topping lift) I left the slip, hoisted sail and a gust caught me from abeam. Laid the boat over to where water was pouring over the coamings, until finally the boat laid over far enough to lift the rudder out of the water, when the boat rounded up. You cannot pay out a mainsheet if the boom is held to the back stay!!! I removed the stupid thing that day,, and rigged lift. When I was a sailboat dealer, on used boats we we selling, we'd cut them off matter of course, and put on a topping lift  

Joe

TSBB 2 said: Only been knocked down once. In the 70's I had a San Juan 21, which had one of those dangerous pigtails clips mounted on the back stay to hold the boom up (instead of a proper topping lift) I left the slip, hoisted sail and a gust caught me from abeam. Laid the boat over to where water was pouring over the coamings, until finally the boat laid over far enough to lift the rudder out of the water, when the boat rounded up. You cannot pay out a mainsheet if the boom is held to the back stay!!! I removed the stupid thing that day,, and rigged lift. When I was a sailboat dealer, on used boats we we selling, we'd cut them off matter of course, and put on a topping lift Click to expand
Joe said: The pig tail was never intended to be used with the mainsail up. Too bad you learned the hard way. It's just a convenient way of storing the boom when the sail isn't up. Click to expand

capta

My first thought was, "an inattentive crew". If you are in conditions where you fear a knockdown, someone should have the sheet in hand, not secured to a cleat. Also, local knowledge is very helpful in avoiding situations like this. Anytime you have a valley coming out of mountains you have a potential for a downdraft which can easily knockdown a sailing vessel. We had one where I grew up. As you sailed from Sausalito towards the Golden Gate, there was a valley that was called 'Hurricane Gulch' by sailors. When the wind was 15 or less everywhere else, one would be rail well underwater as you sailed through the gulch. But you knew it was there and you were therefore prepared for it, so it wasn't a big deal. Anyway, the spreader tips need a good washing every now and then.  

Gunni

...and not having that centerboard down and locked.  

druid

In a small, light boat, things happen FAST. I heard the definition of "knockdown" was having the boom in the water, and if that's the case, I was knocked down a few times in my Venture 22 (similar to Catalina 22). Boom in the water, water coming in the cockpit... but I released the mainsheet and rounded up and popped back up (ALWAYS had the keel bolted down!). Getting knocked down while flying a chute is a different matter: trip the spin halyard, but you'll have a sail in the water being a sea anchor while you're main's flying around... Bad News. In a boat with little ballast (I include water ballast in here: I just don't LIKE it...), you can be knocked down with as little as 15 knots wind, especially a gust. druid  

RussC

fred1diver said: hey everyone, I was wondering what does it take to knock down a sailboat? I'm being overly cautious this year (not sure why) so I'm wondering what it takes to knock a 23 footer trailer sailer down thanks in advance Click to expand
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IMAGES

  1. What Is A Sailing Knockdown & Why Does It Happen?

    sailboat knockdown

  2. What is a Knockdown in Sailing?

    sailboat knockdown

  3. What Is a Sailboat Knockdown? (An In-Depth Guide)

    sailboat knockdown

  4. What Is a Sailboat Knockdown? (An In-Depth Guide)

    sailboat knockdown

  5. J 70 Knockdown, up close, windy conditions ... St.F.Y.C

    sailboat knockdown

  6. VIDEO: Dramatic knock-down in hurricane force winds >> Scuttlebutt

    sailboat knockdown

VIDEO

  1. Event 34 Sailboat Croatia

  2. Ungrounding a Sailboat Stuck In It's Slip at Hight Tide. Got It, But Couldn't Fully Resecure It

  3. Knockdown! Solo Sailor Simon Curwen: Onboard footage from Hobart to Chile

  4. Knockdown while sailing solo around Antarctica

  5. SINGLE-HANDED DOCKING IN 20 KNOT CROSSWIND

  6. In-Tuition sails to Waterside

COMMENTS

  1. How to survive a knock down and how to recover quickly

    Sometimes a boat running before a sea can be given a shove by a wave - and the wind does the rest. A knock down here will be to 90° or less. Knock downs caused by waves occur when the boat goes beam on to a big sea because a rogue wave catches the helm out and here the knock down will vary and is likely to be greater than 90°.

  2. knockdown vs. capsize vs. broach

    Broach - boat is pushed to an extreme angle of heel (40º+) - usually by wind. Kockdown - boat is pushed to an very extreme angle of heel (50º+) - usually wind or wave. Boat may right itself. (boat was knocked down, but popped right back up) Capsize - boat is turned upside down (90º+) Others will weigh in, and tell you something different.

  3. What is a Knockdown in Sailing? Causes and how to avoid it

    A knockdown in sailing is a situation where a sailboat is knocked over to its side, causing the mast to nearly parallel or even touch the water. This event is a form of capsizing, albeit less severe, where the boat is knocked over 90 degrees or even completely upside down. Knockdowns typically occur in adverse weather conditions when the ...

  4. What Is A Sailing Knockdown & Why Does It Happen?

    Here's What a Knockdown is: A knockdown happens when the sailboat is knocked over on its side to roughly 90 degrees. The mast will touch the water in a knockdown. In dinghies, the term is called flipping. Knockdowns are when waves overpower the boat. Often, a keelboat will begin to right itself almost immediately.

  5. What Is a Sailboat Knockdown? (An In-Depth Guide)

    A sailboat knockdown is an extreme and potentially dangerous tilt of a sailboat caused by a powerful gust of wind. It can range from partially to completely capsizing the boat, and the severity depends on many factors. Knowing how to prevent and survive a knockdown is key to staying safe and avoiding damage to the boat.

  6. What Is a Sailing Knockdown and Why Does It Happen? Guide

    What is a knockdown in sailing? Definition of a knockdown in sailing A knockdown in sailing refers to a sudden and extreme heeling of a sailboat caused by external forces such as strong winds or waves. It is a situation where the boat is tilted at a severe angle, often to the point where the mast may touch or almost touch the water.

  7. What is the definition of a knockdown

    a knockdown occurs when a sail boat lays over far enough to put the mast in or beneath the water. This usually happens when the boat is caught abeam by a large wave, which is a condition to avoid if at all possible. Most sailboats will quickly recover from a knockdown once the wave has passed.u000bu000bTerry. D.

  8. Knockdown recovery

    The boat did heal over to a point where the mast was parallel to the water. Scared me to death, but I instinctively released the mainsheet as the boat was going over. ... Don't be fooled into believing that a C-22 can not be sunk in a knock down. Two summers ago on a lake near Austin Texas, group of experienced sailors on a C-22 were competing ...

  9. Lessons Learned from a Knockdown

    Images: 12. Lessons Learned from a Knockdown. Last October, when on a rhumb line from Venice Inlet to Key West in my Cal 28, I got to experience my first knock down. A buddy and myself were sailing more or less south with about 15kts steadily blowing from dead astern. Sailing on the backs of the swells, wing and wing with a 150 Genny, making ...

  10. How Often Do Sailboats Capsize? (Explained For Beginners)

    The first is a knockdown, often called a flip in dinghies. A knockdown is when your boat is knocked over 90 degrees, to where the mast and sails are touching the water. Dinghies can recover from a knockdown fairly easily. One (sometimes more) of the crew stands on the centerboard, and their weight levers the boat back into an upright position.

  11. Knockdown in a C22

    The crew was all on the high side and the boat laid completely over. According to the committee boat at the mark the entire wing keel and rudder were out of the water. The Genoa was in the water, and there was water coming over the coming into the seating area. The boat stayed on its side until the main was released and immediately stood back up.

  12. Definition of Knockdown?

    Faster. I'd define a knockdown as any time the boat gets rolled to near 90deg heel - whether by a gust or wind or a large sea, or as the aftermath of a broach when sailing downwind. Generally by then your fins are nearly out or out of the water, no longer effective and, indeed, the spreaders may well be wet.

  13. Sailling boat knockdown caught on Video

    Watch how a sailboat nearly capsizes in a shallow bar in Mexico. The video shows the waves, the boat's reaction and the narration of the sailors, who are cancer survivors and sailing advocates.

  14. Question that only sailors could answer : r/sailing

    r/sailing. • 1 yr. ago. ADMIN MOD. Question that only sailors could answer. Tonight, my mum and I sat down and watched "True Spirit", the film about Jessica Watson on Netflix. When we saw the scene where her boat capsized and went 15 feet underwater before righting itself and coming back up, I wanted to know if that was an actual possibility.

  15. MacGregor KNOCKDOWN

    Better boat than I am a sailor I have a V-21 that I bought new in 1970. There have been only a few times that some may consider a knockdown. As the title says she is a better boat than I was as sailor. Even when I was literally walking on the side of the cockpit, the boat knew she was suppose to come back up.

  16. Knockdown and Rescue

    Re: Knockdown and Rescue La côte basque espagnole est réputée dangereuse, notamment pour les entrées et sorties de port. Ce jour de février 2014, un Bavaria 38, avec sept personnes à bord (certaines très mal placées) et un tangon toujours à poste, se présente devant l'étroit chenal menant au port de Zumaia.

  17. US4998498A

    A knockdown sailboat adapted to be stowed in a carrying case which includes inflatable hulls, a frame made up of longitudinal sectional tubular members connected securely to spaced-apart lateral tubular frame members, and a telescopic sectional mast stepped to the frame so formed. A carrying case is provided which is made up of two identical halves which serve as deck benches on each ...

  18. Boat knockdown

    Boat knockdown. Thread starter JR13103; Start date May 28, 2005; Forums. Catalina Owner Forums. Smaller Boats. Status Not open for further replies. J. JR13103. May 8, 2004 2 - - ... Most of the knock-down power comes from the main. If you are out and the wind picks up and the boat gets tippy (wont's to round up), drop the traveler and ease the ...

  19. Smoke billows from fire on Ross Island

    Dark smoke billowed over parts of Portland Saturday afternoon as firefighters worked to attack a fire on Ross Island. The fire was reported at 4:43 p.m. Portland firefighters were about to call a ...

  20. Knock down

    fred1diver. Aug 17, 2013 852 Pearson P30 202 Ottawa/Gatineau P30 202 Ottawa/Gatineau