THE earliest model yachts had no steering gear whatsoever, and consequently were unable to sail a good course when the wind was anywhere abaft the beam. The first steering gears to come into use were weighted rudders, and though these were better than nothing at all, it was not until 1906 that the first efficient steering gear was invented. With its invention model yachting at one stride advanced from being a more or less childish pastime to a sport calling for great skill and accuracy.


Now, in theory the main function of the rudder is not to hold a yacht on her course, but to steer her back to her course when she is thrown off it by a puff of wind. Actually, in practice, the helm does hold the boat on her course, and with a good helmsman every variation in the wind is anticipated and met, so that the yacht keeps a dead-straight course. A straight line is the shortest distance between any two points, and, obviously, the helmsman who sails the straightest course is going to gain much ground on his rivals.


It would, therefore, seem to be an absolutely correct principle in models to make the very factor that tends to throw the yacht off her course actuate the rudder to keep her straight. Several attempts were made to do this, and in 1906 Mr. George Braine of Kensington evolved the steering gear for models which bears his name.

By this gear, the angle of the rudder can be made to vary in exact ratio to the pressure of the wind on the sail. During the years that have elapsed since its introduction, minor improvements have been made in the pattern of the quadrant and by the substitution of a slide for the pinrack with which early gears were fitted. The principle of the gear, however, remains absolutely unchanged.
The method of using this gear is not covered here, and we are here concerned mainly with the way to make it and fit it up. At the same time some little explanation at this point may be of assistance to the builder in making and fitting the gear correctly.

The principle is briefly that as the wind freshens the yacht tends to head up towards the wind. In a full-sized vessel the helmsman corrects this by giving the yacht weather helm. In the model the pressure of the wind on the sail causes it to pull on the sheet, which is attached to the helm and thus operates the rudder. There is an elastic centering line to bring the rudder back amidships. As the pull of the sail must operate through the weather sheet, the steering lines are accordingly crossed.

The gear itself consists of a quadrant attached to the rudder-head, a pair of pulleys, a tension slide, and an elastic centering line. The first essential of any steering gear is that the rudder shall move freely. To ensure this, the pintle must be properly made and fitted and the rudder-post must not bind in the rudder-tube. Care should be taken that no paint or varnish gets inside the rudder-tube, as nothing will cause a rudder to bind more. Another point of the utmost importance is that the pulley blocks must run very freely and that the steering lines must render easily through them.


The quadrant of an A-class boat will measure about 4 in. from back to front, and about 5 in. across. It will be smaller proportionately for the smaller classes. The radius of the curve of the forward part is approximately 4 1/2 in, and the holes for the hooks are spaced 3/16-in. centres. A wire loop is hard soldered on the underside of the tail to take the rubber centering line as shown in the end view given in the diagram. In order to take the rudder-post, the quadrant carries a sleeve 5/8 in. long. This is hard soldered to the quadrant, and has about half its length below it. The sleeve must be a close fit for the rudder-head. A set screw passes through sleeve and rudder-head, and prevents the quadrant from wringing round. It is essential that the rudder and quadrant be very carefully lined up when drilling the hole for the setscrew, as if the rudder is the least fraction out of central the boat will not sail properly.


A suitable length of rubber cord is now cut off to form the centering line. For an A-class model this will be 3/16-in. diameter. The rubber is used double. The ends are lashed together, and the cord middled and hooked on at the stern. It is then passed through the eye in the quadrant, and one part passed on each side of the rudder post under the quadrant. The quadrant will have to be taken off whilst this is being done. A cord with a bowser is fastened to the forward end of the centering line to allow for its adjustment. Carefully line up and put a screw-eye into the deck to take the forward end of the centering line. The slides have now to be put in place. In the case of a single slide, the rubber passes through the hole in the slider, but in the case of double slides it passes between them. In putting the slides into position, great care must be taken that they do not give the rudder bias either way. The slides should be so placed that when in the most forward position the slide is within 1/16 in. of the tail of the quadrant.
The steering pulleys have now to be fixed. These should be sufficiently far apart to ensure the leeward line remaining idle if the boom rises somewhat in a heavy wind.


Although the use of tension slides enables the pinrack to be dispensed with, many skippers still fit one in addition. Moreover, for certain purposes they are very convenient. In any case this is a very simple fitting to make.


The material required is two strips of brass 3 in. wide. Bend the first to form a bridge over the tail of the steering quadrant and just clearing it comfortably. Bend the second to form a corresponding bridge under the quadrant, about half way between the tail and the deck. The length of these bridges will vary between 2in, and 3 1/2 in, according to the size of the boat. Drill holes in the ends of the bridges to clear a 3/8-in. No. 1 screw. As the two bridges are screwed down to the deck together, the holes must register. Screw both parts down together on a spare piece of wood. Starting at the exact centre, drill pinholes right across at 3/16-in. intervals. Since the two bridges are screwed down to the deck together, it is unnecessary to sweat them together, but it makes a rather neater job to do so. To complete the fitting, two pins are required. These should be long enough to go through both bridges without touching the deck. To avoid loss, the pins should be secured by short lanyards.


This completes the gear required for Braine steering, unless it is wanted to make provision for jib steering as well as mainsail. In such case, an extra pair of pulleys and two quadrant hooks are needed.


When a model is fitted with Braine steering, the steering is out of action when she is close hauled, and she relies entirely on the trim of her sails. Although this will be discussed at length when we are dealing with the handling of a model yacht, it must briefly be referred to here.

Since a vessel cannot sail against the wind, she has to work to windward in a series of " tacks," pointing first to one side of her goal c and then to the other. To gain ground to windward, tacks must be sailed at an angle of less than 90 degrees to the wind, and a close-winded yacht will sail at about 4 degrees'. A boat's course is determined largely by her sail trim, and some boats " point " higher than others. If a boat is sailed too close, she will not " foot " (move smartly through the water), but lose speed. Sailing to windward becomes, therefore, a compromise between pointing and footing, so as to get the boat the greatest possible distance to windward in the shortest possible time.

 

 

 

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braine steering gear model yachts

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BRAINE AND VANE STEERING

Two sheets showing full working drawings for a variety of steering and sail control devices for vintage restored and replica yachts of all types.Most diagrams are fully dimensioned for reproduction by competent model makers.Designed by G W Clark.

Specification

Full description.

Featured in July 2001 Marine Modelling International

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Vintage Model pond yacht Braine steering quadrant gear by Grove Pond Yachts

Vintage Model pond yacht Braine steering quadrant gear by Grove Pond Yachts

  • Condition: New

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vane self-steering gear

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A method by which the wind, acting on a rotatable vane linked to a rudder, can be set to steer a sailing yacht on a given course. This principle of wind-vane-operated gear was introduced in the mid-1920s to control model racing yachts while sailing downwind. Known as the Braine gear, after the name of its inventor, it proved highly effective, and in the model-yacht-racing world quickly superseded the older hit-and-miss contrivances with weights and springs then in use.

It was first applied to full-sized yachts about 1948. The gear comprised an upright metal or hardboard vane, like a small sail, mounted on a freely turning swivel plate. With the vane adjusted like a weathercock to the wind relative to the desired course, and connected by means of rods and linkage to a servo-tab on the yacht's rudder, or to a separate small rudder mounted right aft, the yacht is made to keep her course whether close hauled, or with the wind abeam, or with a following wind.

These self-steering gears, which are manufactured in a variety of types and sizes, have been widely used by ocean-going yachtsmen, particularly when cruising short handed or solo. See also steering gear.

From:   vane self-steering gear   in  The Oxford Companion to Ships and the Sea »

Subjects: History

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22 Aug 2003, 15:00 BST

  • These yachts, built on a scale of 1 2/2" = 1' using the standard six meter mathematical formula, were famously known as 'Scottish Wee Sixes'. The Braine steering gear was devised by the late George Braine of the London Model Yacht Club in the early 1900's. This yacht is registered for International racing with the Scottish Model Yacht Association, the no K491 allows her to race competatively worldwide.

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Sheringham, Red sails in the Sunset (video)

Sailing in Sheringham video  Click to view video (6 minutes) of the yacht with Red sails sailing in a light breeze.  (Opens in new browser window)

RedSailsInTheSunset

Restored 3 foot free sailing yacht.  Was probably originally built in the late 1950s or 1960s.

The original sails were nylon painted with varnish.  They were very fragile breaking up with holes in the sails when I took the the model on, but there as enough of the sails to make a rough template. The new sails were made from red kite ripstop nylon, I did want white, but no other colour was available. Since the popularity of people building their own kites has dropped the availability of suitable sail material has become almost impossible.

The hull is balsa wood “bread and butter” construction.  The hull had many dings and dents.  The hull was stripped back to bare wood, filled and sanded smooth, given several coats of Epoxy P30 resin to give a tougher protective shell to the balsa. The hull was wet and dry sanded smooth and finally painted, and wet and dry rubbed down between coats.

The deck was stripped of all fittings and the raised deck parts at the bow and stern were removed because the original ply was delaminating.  Replacement pieces were cut and glued to the deck  with aerolite glue.  As were the reinforcement discs around the various eyes for the rigging.  Some of the eyes that were not original brass and were corroding were replaced with solid brass fittings. The deck was relined to give the effect of planking, then varnished and rubbed down with wet and dry repeatedly to give a reasonable finish. The hull is due for a rub down and perhaps an improved paint job with two contrasting colours.

It has Braine steering, but never successfully tuned it to work satisfactory.   More information about Braine steering on the VMYG site . The original rudder was missing, a small replacement rudder had been fitted that when I tried out sailing the yacht had no effect on steering the yacht. I made a new ‘spade’ rudder cut from some brass sheet, soldered to brass rod.

The rigging was all replaced, the original rigging had been knotted together due to the fact the rigging had rotted and snapped in many places.

Click to view short video (6 minutes) of the yacht with Red sails sailing in a light breeze.  (Opens in new browser window)

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US VMYG Newsletter / Journal Index

Prepared by Ken Young

The following is an index of the newsletter (through Volume 18, Number 2) and the journal (beginning with Volume 19, Number 1). The list indicates the major articles that appeared in the publications of the US VMYG when it began in the Spring of 1997. It does not include the editor’s comments, the president’s message, planned activities, and organizational items such as the leadership list.

~ JOURNAL  – The Model Yacht ~

Volume 25, number 1 – spring 202 ( boat identification ).

  • Overview of the US VMYG Website. by Jeffrey Beck.  Jeff provides a comprehensive description of all areas of the Group’s website, with details on the various areas and benefits the site provides members.
  • Fiona .   by Lisa Bauer, Ken Young, Chuck Lage, John Henderson, and Graham Reeves. Lisa needed help identifying a boat her dad built in the 1960s. The process involved a half dozen sleuths, including Graham Reeves in the UK. It turned out to be Fiona. Lisa decided to use her seamstress skills to make new sails for her now identified boat.
  • A Display Boat?   by Stephen Cross, Bruce Richter, and John Stoudt. Stephen contacted Bruce for some help with identifying he found that has been in storage for 40 years. Stephen, Bruce and John work through the various clues to determine what it might be,
  • A Skiff Sailed Boat.   by Bill Sash and Earl Boebert. Bill asked for assistance in identifying a boat. Earl lists three factors that helped determine the type of boat Bill has and described how it was raced in the 1920s.
  • Friendship-Rigged Nottingham : Below Deck. by Gudmund Thomson. Gudmund takes us through the process of designing the eight-servo system for sail control in his 60-in Nottingham, including running backstays. He uses CAD drawings and a 3D printer to create the parts for his system, and he describes the complex below-deck arrangement.
  • Yachting in London.    Written in 1899 and shared by John Smith, Sheldon, S.C. Original article written in 1899 describing a young boy’s introduction to model sailing. The article describes the model sailing scene in London and a description of a day of racing with the London Yacht Club in the late 1800’s.

Volume 24, Number 3 – Fall 2023 ( Building )

  • 2023 US VMYG National Championship Regatta Report. by John Stoudt. A complete summary and final scores of all classes, as well as special awards. John includes descriptions of rare vintage boats in attendance, especially A Boats celebrating their 100 th anniversary.
  • Modeling the Chesapeake Bugeye Brown Smith Jones . by John Henderson. John gives a history of Chesapeake workboats and their development focusing on Bugeyes, specifically the Brown Smith Jones . He then describes the construction process of the 49-in model, with excellent photographs and drawings.
  • A Chesapeake Skipjack Stole My Heart, But I Love Her Anyway. by Peter Simmons. Peter describes his early modeling experiences building Thames River Barges, which lead to his interest in scratch-built Skipjacks.
  • Modeling L Francis Hereshoff’s Design No. 53:  Ben My Chree ( the Stuart Knockabout). by John Henderson. John describes scaling down the original plans for a Hereshoff 28-ft knockabout to a 42-in model, and the calculations and construction techniques he used.
  • It’s a 10-Rater! by Jeff Beck. Jeff found an old hull that he thought was an A Boat, but turned out to be a 10 Rater. He describes the process of deconstructing the hull and frames, planking the deck, and designing the rig.
  • Remnant’s Restoration (It seemed like a good idea at the time…) by Chuck Lage. Chuck was given a Marblehead hull in horrible condition and explains his process of restoring a derelict yacht to a fully rigged racing sailboat.
  • Sailing a Malay Jong: Not as Simple As One Might Think. by John Stoudt. John takes his Indonesian Malay Jong for its maiden voyage and discovers the idiosyncrasies of an exotic, but fast, sailboat.

Volume 24, Number 2 – Summer 2023 ( Fittings )

  • 2023 Membership Survey Report. by John Stoudt. A summary of the survey sent to members in early 2023.
  • Tee-shaped Brass for Various Fittings. by TMY Staff. Making a brass “tee” out of flat brass stock. These can be used for mast cranes, mast steps, jib racks, shroud racks, and more. Read on usvmyg.org
  • Tools and Materials for Making Metal Fittings. by TMY Staff. Description of tools to help with fittings production. Read on usvmyg.org
  • Fairleads. by TMY Staff. Making fairleads out of brass or aluminum nuts and bolts. Read on usvmyg.org
  • Gooseneck Attachment Bracket. by TMY Staff. Making a gooseneck attachment bracket from brass strip and ball joint. Read on usvmyg.org
  • A Simple Mast Step On Deck. by TMY Staff. Using a flat brass or aluminum plate for multi-position mast step. Read on usvmyg.org
  • Turnbuckles. by TMY Staff. Making turnbuckles using a clevis and rigging screw. Read on usvmyg.org
  • Constructing a Sail Control Arm. by TMY Staff. Making a strong and light sail arm. Read on usvmyg.org
  • Addressing Sail Arm Friction. by Steve LeBrenz. Using Porcelane China Paint to reduce sheet friction in a sail arm. Read on usvmyg.org
  • Rudder Connecting Rod. by TMY Staff. Making a rudder connecting rod using threaded rod, clevis, and rigging coupler. Read on usvmyg.org

Volume 24, Number 1 – Winter/Spring 2023 ( Sailing & Tuning )

  • The Tuning Cycle. by Bob Sterne. This is a reprint of a tuning cycle design originally published in Model Yachting .
  • Bench Tuning Your Boat. by John Stoudt. John presents some techniques for adjusting sheet travel before your first on the water tuning. He also discusses acceptable and unacceptable metal O rings and hooks.
  • Sails: The Source of Power An Introduction to Model Yacht Sails, Part 1. by Rod Carr. Sailmaker Rod Carr gives an introduction and explanation of sail nomenclature, shape, construction, mast attachments, and settings.
  • It’s Not The Slot! How sails really work. by Bob Scepanski, Bob takes a new look at the jib/main “slot” and what really goes on with wind circulation as it goes around and through the sails in this reprint from Model Yachting . He explains common misconceptions about the “slot”.
  • Switching Gears and Sailing Fast. by Richard Kahle. Richard explains his process of setting up his boat, and adjusting sail twist on the water with sheet vanging and jib trim adjustments in this reprint from Model Yachting .
  • TECH TOPICS: Helm Balance, with simple calculations of Center of Lateral Resistance and Center of Effort. by John Henderson. John explains the concept of boat “tracking” and provides formulas for determining CLR of the hull and the CE of sails. He describes the relationship between the two forces and how to optimize that relationship. Read on usvmyg.org
  • Carr High Twist Sail Handling Instructions. by Rod Carr. Sailmaker and designer Rod Carr explains the development of Carr High Twist sails. He then gives a step by step description of tuning both main and jib to take advantage of the new design.
  • The Right Jibe (or Gybe?) by Lester Gilbert. Lester looks at downwind sailing from two perspectives. One is how to achieve the best boat speed out of the set of your sails at various angles off the wind. The other is which jibe to be on from tactical racing perspectives.
  • “My Boat is Sinking!” by Martin Blumenthal and John Stoudt. A sight that no skipper wants to see is the tip of his mast disappearing beneath the water in the middle of the pond. Sometimes you get lucky and your club has members involved with underwater ROV’s. This is a fascinating description of an incident at the Chester Springs Yacht Club in Pennsylvania and the process of retrieving a Vintage 36 from the bottom of the pond, including underwater video.
  • A Boat Dryer. by Martin Blumenthal. Martin describes how to use a computer fan to dry the inside of your hull.
  • Friendship-Rigged Nottingham 60. by Gudmund Thompson. Gudmund continues his description of the rigging and sail controls of his beautiful Nottingham 60. He provides a chart with the functions of all eight servos.

Volume 23, Number 3 – Fall 2022 ( Boat Identification)

  • How (Where) Did You Find That? Pond Bo a t Treasure Hunting in the 21 st Cen tury. by Mike Denest. Mike takes us through the process of finding and identifying vintage pond boats using modern technology. He shares his experience of finding and trying to identify a 6 Rater. He discusses using the internet as a source for both finding and identifying boats including eBay, craigslist, auction house sites, as well as just word of mouth.
  • A Dean ’ s Loft Discovery. by Mar ia Ferguson and Martin Bandy. In the process of clearing out their p arent ’ s home of more than fifty five years , the Deans find two vintage pond yachts. In trying to discover the lineage of the two boats, Maria was put in touch with Martin Bandy in the UK. She provides the email conversations they had and steps that were taken to determine the history of the two boats.
  • Flotation Chambers for Models of Open Cockpit Boats. by John Henderson . As a follow up to the articles John and Stanton Smith provided in the Spring 2022 issue of this journal, John provides a process of a dding flotation to an open cockpit boat including calculating the amount of flotation, placement, types of flotation, and appearance.
  • Two – Pond – Boat Inquiry. by Travis Butler, John Stoudt, and Earl Boebert . Travis has two vintage pond boats. One he has had for 40 y e ars and one is new to him. He provides a fascination discussion he had with John Stoud t and Earl Boebert trying to determine the history of the boats.
  • Museum Find. by John Hill . As a volunteer at t h e Santa Barbara Maritime Museum, John discovered a vintage pond yacht that he ’ s trying to identify. He provides a discussion with John Stoudt trying to determine the history of the boat. Thanks in part to o ne of John ’ s college student colleagues they were able to determine the boat ’ s origins.
  • U S Vintage Model Yacht Group 2022 Regatta Report. Result s , pictures and summary of the 2022 National Championship for all classes of the US VMYG .
  • My Grandfather ’ s Boat. by Greg Williams. Greg describes the process of finding the history o f a boat that was owned by his grandfather that originated in England and ended up in Detroit with the help of John Stoudt, Graham Reeves, and Martin Bandy.
  • A 1920 – 19 30 Wooden Model Cutter. by Kathryn T. and Bob Zeyher . The steps that were taken to try to identify a pond boat that belonged to Kathryn ’ s grandfather and had been sitting in her garage for 65 years.
  • Swiss Marblehead. by Lee Bryant . Lee has a Mar blehead that he was told originated in Switzerland. With some help from the UK Vintage Gro up, he was able to learn who had built it and who had registered it first.

Volume 23, Number 2 – Summer 2022 ( Design Considerations)

  • Model Yacht Design in 1896. –  Excerpts from Model Yachts and Model Yacht Sailing – How to Build, Rig, and Sail a Self Acting Model Yacht   by Jams E Walton. Walton describes how he used the shapes of a mackerel and a duck as design parameters for faster sailboat hulls, as well as determining rig dimensions.
  • Modeling a Historic Chesapeake Bay Log Canoe. by John Henderson – a brief history and a detailed description of designing and building a classic Chesapeake Bay log canoe. Read on usvmyg.org
  • Modeling an Open Cockpit Boat Using a Raised Floor. by Stanton Smith – the process of designing and building a raised floor in the open cockpit of a Chesapeake Bay log canoe. His design is another take on John Henderson’s design in the previous article.
  • Modeling the J-Boat Rainbow for the Vintage 36/600 Class: A Challenge of Scale. by John Henderson – the challenges, calculations, and design process of downsizing a J-Class Rainbow to scale for a 36-in boat.
  • Running Backstays. by Gudmund Thompson – the calculations, design, and sailing a model yacht with functioning running backstays. Updated on usvmyg.org
  • TECH TOPICS: Speed. by John Henderson – formulas for calculating boat speed, as well as an explanation of all the factors that effect the speed of a hull going through the water.

Volume 23, Number 1 – Winter 2022 ( Ingenuity 2)

  • Tribute to Rick Hilsinger.  – on his retirement from The WoodenBoat School.
  • Tribute to Captain William D “Bill” Pinkney . – A summary of Bill’s sailing career beginning with his early membership in the Central Park Model Yacht Club to his 2021 induction into the National Sailing Hall of Fame.
  • Basic Model Yacht Finishing/Refinishing. by Walt Shuggs – Walt, a finishing expert at Ford Motor Company, gives tips on creating the hull finish we all want. Read on usvmyg.org
  • Making a Spreader. – The editorial staff explains how to make spreaders using stainless steel rods and brass tubes. Read on usvmyg.org
  • Sanding Fixtures.   by John Stoudt –  tips on sanding hard to reach places and surfaces with strange shapes.
  • Lift-N-Carry. by Richard Mikulec – Richard designed and built a free standing lifter for his Marblehead that allows him to leave it fully rigged, standing upright, launch, retrieve, and make adjustments easily.
  • A Deck Clamp. by  Jeff Beck – a method for gluing a deck to a hull by clamping it with pegs and bungee cords.
  • It Ain’t Pretty But It’s Effective.   The editorial staff explains how to create a paint booth using a drop cloth. Read on usvmyg.org
  • A Mobil Work Stand.   by John Stoudt –   how he developed a stand to support a hull being restored without causing additional problems. He has made it mobile to address a problem we all have – not enough room.
  • Shroud Savers. by  Chuck Lage – a way of using potato chip bag clips to organize the rat’s nest of shrouds and halyards that we all deal with into a manageable system.

Volume 22, Number 3 – Fall 2021 ( Ingenuity)

  • Before Remote Control. by Alan Suydam – This article was first published in Issue 197 of Model Yachting . Alan discusses the various ways that model yachts were controlled before remote control was available.
  • Tesla and the First Remote-Controlled Boat. by Ken Young – Ken discusses this very early R/C boat and when and where it was exhibited.
  • Tesla’s Remote-Controlled Boat. by John Henderson – John discusses technical aspects of the electronics used in Tesla’s boat.
  • British Boat Rigging. by John Stoudt – John discusses the ingenious way that this boat was rigged for sailing in various types of wind on Round Pond in London with unusual ways to adjust the rig size and fascinating deck fittings.
  • US VMYG 2021 National Regatta Report. – This article reports on the five events held in Honey Brook, PA (October 2021) which included 32 skippers sailing 66 boats in the regatta.
  • Wind Indicator. by TMY Editorial Staff – This article discusses the construction of a simple, effective mast top wind indicator.
  • TECH TOPICS: Positioning the Ballast. by John Henderson – John discusses the importance of the position of the ballast in a model yacht. He explains ballast placement and the success of the model yacht when completed. Read on usvmyg.org
  • Electronics Board Layout. by John Stoudt – John explains a simple layout that can be applied to many model yachts. This layout is simple and prevents the tangling of the sheets under the deck of a boat.
  • And a not so Simple Electronics Board. by Gudmund Thompson – Gudmund designed this complex electronics board that he installed in the Colin Archer. He provides an explanation of the board and its design.
  • Making a Deck Beam Pattern. by TMY Editorial Staff – This article explains how to make a deck beam pattern that can be used to layout all of the deck beams from this one pattern. Read on usvmyg.org

Volume 22, Number 2 – Summer 2021 ( Early Venues )

  • Insert – The Model Yachting Center Proposal brochure
  • A Tribute to Alan Suydam. by TMY Editorial Staff – An announcement of him winning the AMYA Hall of Fame Award and an overview of Alan Suydam’s background and his career as a model boatbuilder, sailor, mentor, and competitor, as well as his many contributions to the sport of RC sailing.
  • Washington Model Yacht Club (WMYC), Washington DC . by Peter Kelley – Peter tells how he acquired a group of vintage model boats that had been used by members of the WMYC which existed from 1922 into the 1950’s.
  • Pond Sailing in Seattle. by Scott Rohrer – A history of the development sailing on the various Seattle area ponds, along with drawings of several boats they sailed.
  • Robert Bennet Forbes and the Founding of the Bennet Yacht Club. by David Gregg – A story of the formation, history, and activities of a club that was founded in 1883 and still exists today.
  • By Their Marks Ye Shall Know Them. by Mike Denest – A discussion about the sail identification marks on model yacht sails over the years.
  • TECH TOPICS: The Effects of Being Overweight. by John Henderson – A discussion of the effects on boat speed with an increase in weight of five percent. From Lester Gilbert’s work. Read on usvmyg.org
  • Svea Project Follow Up. by TMY Editorial Staff – A discussion between John Henderson and Gene Novak on ballasting problems with Svea J Boat.
  • Svea Ballasting Issues. by Gene Novak – Gene explains the process and problems with ballast in Svea and his attempts to get the ballast weight and position correct.
  • How to Acquire a Model Sailboat Waterline Without Falling in the Pond. by Martin Blumenthal – A quick, easy, and dry way to determine the waterline of a boat using strips of a file folder.

Volume 22, Number 1 – Spring 2021 ( Construction Techniques )

  • Deriving a Vintage 36 Model from a Favorite Vintage Marblehead Design.   by John Henderson – How to change a design/plan to build an effective model yacht.
  • Building a Skeg and Rudder for a Fiberglas Hull. by Ivor Walton Read on usvmyg.org – Materials and process to install a wooden skeg and rudder in a Madcap hull.
  • Building Odyssey . by Michael Neben – Building a model sailboat from a 40-year-old kit.
  • Sanding and Finishing. by John Stoudt – Preparing a wood surface for finishing and the finishing process.
  • The Cutter in Deal. by John Kinghorn – The process of building a free sailed cutter rig model yacht.
  • Bending Wood: The Last Episode. by John Stoudt Read on usvmyg.org – Completion and installation of the hatch cover on a Classic Marblehead.
  • Setting Up Swing-Arm Controls. by John Henderson Read on usvmyg.org – A simple explanation to determine sail arm length.
  • Get Your Boy One (For Yourself). by Peter Kelley – A discussion about the vintage power model yachts sold by the Boucher, Inc.

Volume 21, Number 3 – Fall 2020 ( Boat Restoration )

  • Model Yacht Restoration Decision Making. by Rod Carr Read on usvmyg.org – Organizational plan for restoring model yacht
  • Restoration of An Early “A” Boat. by John Stoudt Read on usvmyg.org – Boat evaluation and restoration process with an investigation of origin and history of boat – could it be a Bill Bithell boat?
  • Restoration: A Boat Without a Keel. by Margaret Ann Rice – Vintage restoration with design of new rudder and keel
  • Busman’s Holiday.   by Tom Price – Complete restoration of 1930’s Marblehead hull, deck, keel, rudder, and rig.

Volume 21, Number 2 – Summer 2020 ( Vintage Boats )

  • Early Pond Yacht Skippers: Bill Bithell. by Cliff Martin
  • A Little History & The Pond Boat Story. by Bob Jones – A history of pond boats starting with the Egyptians
  • Rating Rules for Vintage Boats. by John Henderson Read on usvmyg.org – A discussion of possible technical rating systems for pond yachts.
  • Pepper – A 1948 Chris-Craft Custom Runabout. by Richard Rogers – Completion of Ch ris Craft started by Pepper Langley and completed by Richard
  • Self-Righting Catamaran. by the US VMYG editorial staff with comments by TJ Perrotti
  • The Great Schooner Model Society. by George Surgent
  • Stay at Home Sailing. by Richard Mikulec – Tuning your boat from your couch with a fan
  • Gadgets and Gizmos. A Paint Stand. by Joe Paradine
  • Malay Jong. The Ultimate Free Sailing Model Yacht. by John Stoudt – Story of an Indonesian model yacht and its trip to the US

Volume 21, Number 1 – Spring 2020 ( Skiff Sailing )

  • Lilliputian Cup Defenders. by Harry Dillon Jones
  • Boat Identification. by TMY editorial staff
  • Earl Boebert Craftsmanship Award. by Rob Dutton
  • An Unusual Vintage Marblehead Design. by John Henderson
  • Gadget and Gizmos: Plywood Plank Embosser. by Ken Young
  • The Svea Project – Part 3. by Gene Novak
  • Hulls + from Blue Crab Model Yachts

Volume 20, Number 3 – Fall 2019

  • A Tribute to a Friend, David S. Brawner. by John Stoudt
  • 2019 National Championship Regatta Report (review, pictures, and results). by John Stoudt
  • The Marshall Croft Sportsmanship Award Winners (a history). by TMY editorial staff
  • Early Pond Yacht Skippers – Part 1. by Cliff Martin
  • What Boat Is This? by Nicholas
  • Introduction to Vane Design. by John Fisher
  • The Svea Project – Part 2. by Gene Novak
  • Construction Help. by Allan Thorsen

Volume 20, Number 2 – Summer 2019

  • 36R Class, Race 1. by Mike Stobbe
  • 2 018 Bill Bithell VM Cup Regatta Report. by John Snow
  • Spreckles Lake: Golden Gate Park, San Francisco (a history). by Carl Brosius, Mary Rose Casa, Craig Carter, and Mike Stobbe
  • Boat Repairs: Rub Rail. by John Stoudt Read on usvmyg.org
  • TECH TOPICS: Balance. by T.J. Perrotti  Read on usvmyg.org
  • Danger Lurking! LiPo batteries. by Bill Ewing
  • Planning and Building Scale Model Boats That Sail – Part 3 Building. by John Henderson Read on usvmyg.org

Volume 20, Number 1   Spring 2019

  • Woods Hole Model Boat Show Preview. by Jennifer Gaines
  • 2018 US VMYG V36 and VM National Championships. by John Snow
  • In Search of the “Classic” Marblehead. by Ken Young
  • How to Make a Boom Vang. by Ivor Walton Read on usvmyg.org
  • Bending Wood – Part 3. by John Stoudt Read on usvmyg.org
  • Planning and Building Scale Models That Sail – Part 2: Design Calculations. by John Henderson Read on usvmyg.org
  • US VMYG Clothing Available. by TMY editorial staff Store
  • Model Yacht Construction Classes. by Rich Hilsinger

Volume 19, Number 3 – Fall 2018

  • A Tribute: Earl Boebert. by TMY editorial staff
  • Lighter, Stronger, Faster: The Herreshoff Legacy. by TMY editorial staff
  • 100% Scale Schooner Models? by Charlie Blume
  • Planning and Building Scale Model Boats (Part I). by John Henderson Read on svmyg.org
  • What Class of Boat Is This? by Chuck Luscomb
  • Right Place, Right Time. by Rich Hilsinger
  • Draw an Ellipse. by John Stoudt
  • Make A Mold for Bending Wood. by John Stoudt Read on usvmyg.org
  • The Svea Project. by Gene Novak
  • Storrow Lagoon. by John Storrow
  • Mystic Seaport Museum – The American Model Yachting Collection. by Paul O’Pecko and John Stoudt
  • The Draketail. by Annie and Richard Rogers
  • Banner Unveiled at National Championship Regatta. by TMY editorial staff

Volume 19, Number 2 – Summer 2018

  • How Ya Gonna Keep Them Down on The Farm? by Bruce Richter
  • 3 rd Annual Bill Full Memorial Regatta Report. by John Snow
  • Can’t We All Just Get Along? Evidently, Yes (Central Park Model Yacht Club Vintage Invitational Report). by Bruce Richter
  • A Tribute: John Snow. by TMY editorial staff
  • Vintage Plans Available. by Ivor Walton Shop plans on usvmyg.org
  • Catamarans Big and Small: Part I – The Early Years. by T.J. Perrotti
  • Speaking of Batteries. by John Henderson Read on usvmyg.org
  • Everything Old Is New Again! Resurrecting Vintage Designs with Digital Age Tools. by Steve Deligan
  • Blue Crab Model Yachts. by Cissy Nickel
  • Bending Wood. by John Stoudt Read on usvmyg.org
  • Another Source for Building a Vintage Marblehead. by Steve Deligan

Volume 19, Number 1 – Winter 2018

  • Getting the word out. On-screen. In print. And with your help. by Bruce Richter
  • Maritime Model Expo at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum. by John Henderson
  • Mission Statement and Supporting Pillars. by TMY editorial staff
  • The New Logo. by Jim Flach
  • The Weigh Ahead Survey Report. by TMY editorial staff
  • 2017 US VMYG V36/VM Regatta . by John Snow
  • 2017 US VMYG Traditional Watercraft Regatta Report. by Harry Mote
  • Look What I found in the Dump! – A Bill Bithell Marblehead. by Nick Nobili
  • 2017 Bill Bithell Regatta Report. by John Snow
  • The Vintage Model Yacht Group is…People!! By Ken Young
  • Build Your Own Plank-Constructed Pond Yacht at WoodenBoat School (ME). by Rich Hilsinger
  • Build Your Own Vintage 36 Model Yacht at Hudson River Maritime Museum. by Sarah Wasberg-Johnson

~ NEWSLETTER – The Model Yacht ~

Volume 18, number 2 – winter 2016-2017.

  • The Weigh Ahead (membership survey report update). by John Stoudt
  • Carita – An Unexpected Find (Part III) – completion. by Tom Schreiber
  • Tritonia A 1934 Marblehead. by John Stoudt – restoration with drawings
  • Scat II – A Previously Unknown Design by John Black (Part II – taking lines). by Dave Crawford and Earl Boebert Read on usvmyg.org
  • 2016 US VMYG National Regatta. by Harry Mote
  • Skylark – 36-inch restricted class. by E.C. Tansley (1950) – drawings and instructions

Volume 18, Number 1 – Summer 2016

  • 2016 Traditional Watercraft Regatta. by John Stoudt
  • Carita – An Unexpected Find (Part II) – restoration. by Tom Schreiber
  • Scat II – A Previously Unknown Design by John Black. by Dave Crawford and Earl Boebert –  history and line drawings
  • US VMYG Class Coordinators. by John Stoudt

Special Issue – Special 20 th Anniversary Issue Announcement

  • Announcing the 20 th anniversary regatta and associated activities

Volume 17, Number 3 – Winter 2015-2016

  • Operation Layline. by John Snow
  • Sea Going Model Yachts. by H.M. Savage and J. Case (1906) Read on usvmyg.org – drawings and construction of large model yachts with steering
  • Thorobred . by Matt Walsh Design –  plans

Volume 17, Number 2 – Fall 2015

  • Self-Steering. by Earl Boebert
  •   Carita – An Unexpected Find. by Tom Schreiber
  • Sea Going Model Yachts (1903). by H. M. Savage (1903)
  • Steering Gears for Model Yachts. by W. H. Wilson-Theobold (1903)
  • Steering Gear for Model Yachts. by G. Rhodes (1903)

Volume 17, Number 1   Spring 2015

  • 2014 National Championship Regatta Report. by John Stoudt
  • History of The Craftsmanship Award, The Marshall Croft Sportsmanship Award, National Regatta Locations, Founding Members. by John Stoudt and Ivor Walton
  • Black Watch . by John B. Duncan (1938) – plans and drawings

Volume 16, Number 3 – Winter 2013-2014

  • Windling World. by Mark Steele – schooner and square riggers
  • International Five Point Five Meter Class Pond Model (1/6 Scale). by Jack Gregory
  • Building A Madcap Hull – A Build Log. by Ivor Walton
  • The US/UK Challenge Cup. by Mike Stobbe
  • 2013 US VMYG National Regatta Report. by Harry Mote
  • Harry W “Pete” Petersen, Jr: A Model Yachting Life. by Harry Mote
  • What A Difference A Year Makes. by Earl Boebert Read on usvmyg.org – Line drawings of Wampum, Wampum II

Volume 16, Number 2 – Summer 2013

  • Alternate Design for Self-Tacking Vane. by Ains Ballantyne (1945) – plan
  • Windling World. by Mark Steele
  • The First 36-in Restricted Class Championship. by Mike Stobbe
  • The Designs of Claudio Diolati. by Earl Boebert – drawings for Columbia, Endeavor II, Esterel.
  • Snipe Jr . by William F Crosby (1932) – plans and instructions for 20-in Snipe
  • A Note on Radio Control. by Earl Boebert

Volume 16, Number 1 – Winter 2012-2013

  • Paradoxy . by John Snow – line drawings for a Gus Lassel 40-in sharpie
  • Windling World. by Mark Steele – Of Pretty Boats, Elixirs Sought and Matters Mary!
  • 78 Years of Model Yachting – the 1930s. by Ryan Hunwicks
  • Blackchin II: A Sonder-Inspired V36. by Earl Boebert
  • 2012  National Regatta Report. by John Snow
  • 2012  Traditional Watercraft Regatta Report. by Al Suydam

Volume 15, Number 3 – Spring/Summer 2012

  • US VMYG Vintage 36 Class Rules
  • R/C Vintage Marblehead Rating Rules
  • Starlet . by John Black – drawings, plans, instructions – reprinted from Popular Mechanics , March 1942)

Volume 15, Number 2 – Winter 2011-2012

  • A. Potter’s Bunny I – plan
  • Westward Part XI (update). by Ken Hall
  • S. Wins the Challenge Cup (At Last). by Mark Stobbe
  • 2011 National Regatta Report. by Harry Mote
  • The MYRAA R Class. by Earl Boebert
  • Class Rules and Why We Have Them. by Harry Mote

Volume 15, Number 1 – Summer 2011

  • Windling World. by Mark Steele – Fife-ish Youpi Frencj Cutter for breakfast, fish for lunch, a Clipper for tea, plus schooners and a stunning racer!
  • The Model Sailing Yachts of Franklin Bassford. Revised and Updated by Earl Boebert (2010 and 2011)
  • The Compelling Nature of Experienced Marbleheads. by Thom McLaughlin
  • Bill Huizing’s Puritan photo

Volume 14, Number 3 – Winter 2010-2011

  • Windling World. by Mark Steele – the smallest schooners and square riggers
  • An Appreciation of Priscilla . by Jeff Pierson – restoring A 19 th century pond yacht
  • The Saga of the Little Yankees. by Earl Boebert
  • Model Radio Installations. by Earl Boebert
  • A couple of early photos
  • How About a Square-Rigged Class. by George Steele
  • The Eileen O’Boyle Square Rigger. by Douglas J. Boyle (1932–1933)
  • Plover – M class plan

Volume 14, Number 2 – Fall 2010

  • Windling World. by Mark Steele – A Stunning Westward, A USN Somers , a Schooner out of Bark, Sindia Sails Downunder, and Flavio Footy!
  • Building A Large Model Yacht – Some Lessons Learned. by Ken Hall – 8 ½ foot complete schooner build, shipping container, and sea trials
  • 2010 National Regatta Report. by John Snow

Volume 14, Number 1 – Summer 2010

  • A Marblehead Model Sailing Yacht. by Claude Horst (1939) – plans, drawings, and instructions
  • The Mark Steele Challenge. by Mark Steele

Volume 13, Number 3 – Winter 2009/2010

  • Windling World. by Mark Steele – Give the Man a Sailboat
  • How to Build ‘The M. Y.’ Star Jr . by W.J. Daniels (1929) – 36-in plans and instructions
  • More on Prospero. by Earl Boebert, Russell Potts, and Art Holzman Read on usvmyg.org
  • Yet Another Starlet . by Earl Boebert – drawings
  • Spindrift. Marblehead drawings. A reprint from Model Craftsman , July, and August 1939

Volume 13, Number 2 – Fall 2009

  • Windling World. by Mark Steele -schooners and square rigs
  • Prospero . by W. J. Daniels (1912) Read on usvmyg.org – discussion of balancing hulls
  • A Speedy Racing Schooner. by E. Armitage McCann (~1930)
  • 2009 US Vintage Model Yacht Regatta. by Al Suydam
  • Mystery Marblehead. by John Stoudt
  • A Nifty Little Boat. by W. W. Littlejohn (1928)
  • Onward 18-ft Model. by W. J. Daniels

Volume 13, Number 1 – Summer 2009

  • Daisy . by Jeff Conklin -24-in sloop
  • Big Little Ship or Little Big Ship? by Earl Boebert – square riggers
  • An Attractive Schooner. by Earl Boebert
  • Another Kethman Vane. by Earl Boebert
  • A 25-in Sailing Sloop. by Claude Horst (1933) and Earl Boebert – plans and instructions
  • A Fine Ranger Jr. by Earl Boebert
  • New England VM Regatta. by John Snow

Volume 12, Number 3 – Winter 2008-2009

  • Windling World. by Mark Steele – Of Skunners n “Uvvers, a Vijfmaster, Solo and Three Brfithers
  • A Husky Schooner Designed for Ocean Racing. by Earl Boebert
  • The Fisher Drawings. by Earl Boebert – multiple plans for building and fitting boats
  • Miniature Yacht Clubs. by Earl Boebert and an unknown author (1872) – reprint from Hearth and Home magazine
  • Midget – An Alpha Class Racing Model. by Earl Boebert and unknown author (1921)
  • The Lassel Vane – Theme and Variations. by Earl Boebert
  • The “EZ-Build” Vane. by Graham Reeves
  • Harold Kethman (vane). by Stephen Crewes
  • Bill Bithell Cup VM Regatta. by John Snow
  • Scotland Centenary. by Chris MacKenzie
  • A Whirlwind, Jr. by Steve Kling

Volume 12, Number 2 – Fall 2008

  • Windling World. by Mark Steele – Sindia, Inkerman Smallbones, Lurking Croc, Lady Love and Running Tide!
  • A “Pole Mast” Schooner. by Earl Boebert
  • The Delta Class – Design. by Harold Kethman
  • A Marblehead 450 (vane sailor). by Dave Thibodeau and Earl Boebert
  • An Interesting Tensioner. by Earl Boebert
  • 2008 National Vintage Regatta. by Harry Mote
  • Hartman Model Boats. by Richard Long
  • Another Yankee III. by David Tanski
  • Plans for Broomex and Exsquire (X class boats). by J. Selmer-Larsen

Volume 12, Number 1- Summer 2008

  • Windling World . by Mark Steele – Sharpies for Whatever, The Tour Fassa in the Netherlands, Sailing dem Bottles, and a Magnificent Golden Hind
  • The Restoration of a Sea Scout Racing Model. by Andy Abrahamson
  • Yankee Down Under. by Bob Jones
  • Spindrif (a vane Marblehead). by Charles Meister
  • A replica of a 1920s Boat. by Michael Duddy
  • Chico II. by Steve Mash
  • Black Watch . by John B. Duncan (1938) – 60-in vane boat drawings

Volume 11, Number 3 – Winter 2007-2008

  • Windling World. by Mark Steele– Of Webfooters, Direction-Changers, Favorite Boats, Not-Quite-Footy- Footies, and Purpose-Built Boatyard
  • How to Build A “Straddle Bug”. by William Atkins (1925) – an iceboat on floats
  • Racing Model Yachts. by William Henry (1921) – early racing in New York
  • R/C Vintage Marblehead Rating Rules Update 2007. by John Henson
  • Schooner of 104 tons. by G. W. Monroe (1937)
  • Festive. by Earl Boebert
  • What a Difference a Year Makes Wampum I and Wampum II. by Earl Boebert Read on usvmyg.org
  • Etching “The Trail Trip” (1889)

Volume 11, Number 2 – Fall 2007

  • 2007 National Regatta Report. by John Snow – Celebrating the 75 th Anniversary of the Marblehead Class
  • Windling World. by Mark Steele – Of Square Riggers, Ketches, Sloops and Yawls; Boats for Pleasurable Windling
  • Model Yachting Notes.  by Earl Boebert – VMYG Vane Updated, Traditional Watercraft Survey, Thorobred, Toy Yachting in Central Park
  • Tuning and Trimming a Model Racing Yacht. by Walter K Moss (1937) – vane boats
  • Kittiwake . by Earl Boebert – plan

Volume 11, Number 1 – Summer 2007

  • Adventures in Cold Molding. by Earl Boebert – Part the Second, In Which We Find a Technique That Works Read on usvmyg.org
  • Building 50-in North Carolina Sharpie. by Thomas Pratt
  • Building a Miniature Yacht by the Plank Method. by J. L. Wilson (1924)
  • How About a Dhow? By George Steele
  • Mentoring Project Model Sailboats Launched. by Charles Roden
  • The 2007 US-UK Challenge Cup – San Francisco. by Mike Stobbe and Ernie Mortensen
  • Hayseed VI. by Earl Boebert

Volume 10, Number 3 – Winter 2006-2007

  • 2006 National Vintage Regatta Report. by Harry Mote
  • Traditional Watercraft Regatta. by Buck McClellan, Alan Suydam, and George Sergent
  • Young America Goes Yachting. by Earl Boebert
  • Dreams of the Old Marbleheaders Live on. by Stephen Crewes
  • Adventures in Cold Molding. by Earl Boebert Read on usvmyg.org
  • Kiltie . by Earl Boebert – 6-meter drawings
  • Dodge and Dodge Again. by Earl Boebert
  • Highgate Park. by Earl Boebert – illustration of early sailing
  • A Major New Publication by Curved Air Press. by Earl Boebert

Volume 10, Number 2 – Fall 2006

  • V36 Class Notes (rule proposal). by Alan Suydam
  • Vintage Down Under. by Stephen Crewes (Australia, 2006)
  • Getting Our Feet Wet for the 2007 US–UK Free Sail Regatta. by Ernie Mortensen
  • Sea Gull launched. by Kenneth Hall
  • How to Repair a Split Plank. by Mike Stobbe Read on usvmyg.org
  • Luthier’s and Instrument Maker’s Planes. by Kenneth Hall
  • Building A Model Yacht Hull. by Anonymous (1953)

Volume 10, Number 1 – Summer 2006

  • Self-Tacking Vane Gear for Model Sailing Yachts. Introduction by Earl Boebert and text by John Black (1941)
  • Windling World. Mark Steele
  • Plank on frame construction of a traditional fin keel boat. by Thomas Darling with an introduction by Earl Boebert
  • Afterward: Miserable Rabbett. by Earl Boebert

Volume 9, Number 3 – Winter 2005-2006

  • Onward, Big and Little (10-Raters). by Earl Boebert
  • The US VMYG Vane. by Earl Boebert
  • Yankee III Update. by Earl Boebert
  • Multiconic Design of Hull Surfaces. by S.S. Rabl (1958)
  • Model Sailboats: The Technical Side of a Fascinating Hobby. by Samuel S. Sanford (1930)

Volume 9, Number 2 – Fall 2005

  • 2005 National Regatta Report. by Earl Boebert
  • Workshop Hints and Tips. by Fred Abbe, Earl Boebert, Charlie Roden, Mike Stobbe, and Alan Suydam.
  • An Auxiliary Cruising Schooner. by Earl Boebert
  • 2005 Traditional Watercraft Regatta Report. Buck McLellan
  • Bob Irwin and the A. J. Fisher Co. by Dick Hein
  • DN 36 : A Model Racing Sailboat. by Anonymous (probably Archie Arroll ~1935) – drawings and instructions

Volume 9, Number 1 – Summer 2005

  • US-UK Challenge Regatta 2005. by Graham Reeves and Martin Bandey – review and pictures of 36-inch vane boats
  • Model Sailboat Building in Portland, Oregon, Grade Schools Circa 1950: The Sandra Lee & Sun Kiss . by Paul Stager
  • Faith – A Bristol Channel Pilot Cutter. by Douglas Phillips-Birt (1962)
  • Square Rigged Notes. by George Steele
  • Lilliputian Cup Defenders. by Harry Dillon Jones (1900)
  • Sail Making for Model Yachts. by Thomas Darling (1925)

Volume 8, Number 3 – Winter 2004-2005

  • Porty . by C. G. Butler and Earl Boebert – line drawings for simple sloop
  • A Model of Dodge. by Earl Boebert
  • Ben Bow. by William Atkin (1929)
  • Yacht Sails. by Terrance North (1939) – names and drawings of different types of sails
  • The Vintage 36-in Class. by Alan Suydam
  • Whirlwind Jr. by Earl Boebert – drawings and instructions

Volume 8, Number 2 – Fall 2004

  • 2004 National Regatta Report. by John Atwood
  • Satanita . by Earl Boebert (1893) – largest and fastest cutter ever built
  • Donald Duck . by Earl Boebert – Henry Tucker M class design plan
  • An Inexpensive Bench Block. by Dave Querin
  • Thermopylae : A Sailing Model Clipper Ship. by Graham Henley (1950) – plans and instructions

Volume 8, Number 1 – Summer 2004

  • The Keel Catboat Dodge. by Earl Boebert
  • Model Yachts: How to Design and Build Them. by Arthur C Hyde (1885) Read on usvmyg.org

Volume 7, Number 3 – Winter 2003-2004

  • 2004 Museum of Model Yachting Activities. by John Snow
  • R/C Vintage Marblehead (VM) Ratings Rules. by Charlie Roden
  • Simple Model Yacht Theory. by A.M. Colbridge (1952)
  • Snipe Junior . by W. M. F. Crosby (1932) – 20-in racing model plans and instructions
  • Modified “R” Class plan that meets VM class rule

Volume 7, Number 2 – Fall 2003

  • Twenty Vintage Marbleheads Launched. by Charlie Roden – model sailboat mentoring project
  • Early DX Class History and Sailboat Innovations. by Francis Reynolds
  • 2003 Vintage Marblehead Regatta Report. by Alan Suydam
  • The New Vintage 36 Class. by Alan Suydam
  • Another Small Class: The MM 25-inch vane sailor. by Earl Boebert – plans and instructions

Volume 7, Number 1 – Summer 2003

  • 2003 US-UK Challenge Cup. by Earl Boebert and Jeff Stobbe
  • The Davison Trip Tracking Gear. by A.C. Davidson (1942)
  • Skylark . by F.C. Tansley (1950) – 36-in restricted class – drawings and instructions
  • Line Drawings for 24-in Sharpie. by John Cavileer (1923)
  • 2003 National Regatta Report. by Alan Suydam
  • Steve Crewes Does It Again. by Earl Boebert
  • A Developed – Surface Sailing Model. by William F. Crosby (1944) – plans and instructions for 24-inch sloop

Volume 6, Number 3 – Winter 2002-2003

  • The American Model Yachting Collection (Mystic Seaport). by John Snow
  • 2002 Vintage Traditional Watercraft Regatta Report. by Annie Michnowicz and Richard Rogers
  • The Pirate Model Yacht and the Little Pirates program. by Scott Rohrer
  • R/C for little P irate. by Rod Carr
  • The R Class. by Earl Boebert
  • Bill Bithell Inducted into the AMYA Hall of Fame
  • The Most Beautiful Model Yachting Book – – Ever. by Earl Boebert
  • Afterward: Modern Materials supplement. by Earl Boebert.

Volume 6, Number 2 – Fall 2002

  • The American Model Yachting Collection. by Earl Boebert
  • Modeling Black Hawk. by Earl Boebert and Harry Mote
  • Region One Vintage Marblehead Invitational Regatta. by Bill Hagerup
  • The San Francisco Marblehead Invitational. by Jeff Stobbe
  • 2002 VM National Regatta. by Earl Boebert
  • Traditional Sailing Craft Regatta. by Parker McClellan
  • Fittings and Rigs. by Earl Boebert – description and history of numerous commercial and self-made parts, including various rigging diagrams
  • Shroud adjuster MK 3. by Joe Frasier
  • Yankee III Fittings. by Earl Boebert

Volume 6, Number 1 – Spring/Summer 2002

  • Vamarie.  by Harry Mote – Line drawings and history.
  • The Gypsy Sloops. by Earl Boebert – plans for small boats
  • The in the Water Model Boat Show and Vintage Regatta. by Charlie Roden
  • A Modified Horizontal Lift Method and Two Model Offers You Can’t Refuse. by Harry Mote
  • Book Review – Sydney’s Model Racing Skiffs – A History (Stephen Crewes). by Earl Boebert
  • A Yacht Model for Racing. by Captain E. Armitage McCann (Reprinted from Popular Science July and August 1926) – 20-inch boat plans and instructions

Volume 5, Number 3 – Winter 2001/2002

  • Schooners and Scale News. by Harry Mote
  • 2001 VM National Regatta and Museum Exhibit. by Thom McLaughlin
  • The Y ankee Jr. Project. by Earl Boebert
  • Overlapping Jibs on Small Scale Model Yachts. by Earl Boebert
  • Model Yacht Construction Over a Solid Form. by Ted Houk (1941) and Rod Carr (2001)

Volume 5, Number 2 – Fall 2007

  • The Third Annual San Francisco Model Yacht Club Marblehead Invitational. by Jeff Stobbe
  • Mystic Seaport Model Yacht Regatta. by John Snow
  • UK Report – San Francisco Model Yacht Club racing in the UK. by Jeff Stobbe
  • Traditional Sailing Craft Scale Models Regatta at Mystic Seaport. by Harry Mote
  • Andrew Charters’s Method of Tacking Overlapping Jibs. by Harry Mote
  • US VMYG at The Wooden Boat Show. by Al Suydam
  • Nina and Her “Radical Rig”. by Harry Mote
  • Model Yacht Building at the WoodenBoat School. by Thom McLaughlin
  • Turnbuckles and Bottle Screws. by Jack McKie and Vic Smeed Read on usvmyg.org
  • A Miniature Model Yacht. by Earl Boebert – Wilson Theobald plan

Volume 5, Number 1 Spring/Summer 2001

  • More Six-Foot Schooners. by Tom Pratt
  • Atlantic – The Schooner yacht as a Model. by Harry Mote
  • The Search for the Sydney Model Yacht Continues. by Steve Crewes
  • Make Shavings, Not Sawdust . by Earl Boebert Read on usvmyg.org – about hand planes and chisels
  • Yankee Jr. John Black’s Lost Design. by Earl Boebert

Volume 4, Number 3 – Winter 2000-2001

  • Dorade – The Sailing Yawl. by Earl Boebert and Harry Mote
  • Vintage Marblehead Coordinator Report. by Charlie Bloom
  • The International A Class in the United States. by Rod Carr
  • The Braine Steering Gear. by Charles Farley (1946)
  • Gyeing The Model Yacht. by Walter K. Moss (1940)
  • Free Sailing in the Radio Age. by Earl Boebert with thoughts by Thom McLaughlin

Volume 4, Number 2 – Fall 2000

  • The Second Annual San Francisco Marblehead Invitational Regatta . by Jeff Stobbe
  • Vintage Marblehead Coordinator’s Report. by Charlie Roden
  • 2000 Vintage M Regatta Report. by John Snow
  • Traditional Sailing Craft Scale Model Regatta Report. by Harry Mote
  • Spring Lake Open Attracts 11 Marbleheads. by Harry Mote
  • Scaling Laws. by George Steel
  • The Masthead Fly. by Charles Roden
  • In Search of the Sydney Model Yacht. by Steve Crewes
  • Sailing Spreckles Lake. by Earl Boebert
  • The Lateral Plane of Model Yachts. by Paul Fiske (1946)

Volume 4, Number 1 – Spring 2000

  • Six Foot Schooners. by Andrew Charter with introduction by Harry Mote
  • Old Lithograph. Oldest known picture of model yachting (June 1880)
  • Model Yacht Outreach. by Harry Mote
  • Never Trust a Blueprint. by Reginald Wood Butcher (1946)
  • The Ancient Mariner Speaks. – Questions and Answers
  • The Model Sailing Yachts of Franklin Bassford. by Earl Boebert

Volume 3, Number 3 – Winter 1999/2000

  • Thoughts on Guidelines for Schooner Static Judging. by Harry Mote
  • Book Review – An Introduction to Radio Controlled Scale Sailing Model (Phillip Vaughn Williams). by Harry Mote
  • Vintage Marblehead (VM) Coordinator’s Report. Proposed rule changes. by Charles Roden
  • Book Review – A Bibliography of Model Yachting (Russell Potts). by Earl Boebert
  • A Marblehead Model Sailing Yacht. by Claude Horst – update of Horst’s pamphlet with plans and instructions

Volume 3, Number 2 – Fall 1999

  • Nathanael Herreshoff ‘s Vane Gears. by Nathanael Herreshoff with comments by Earl Boebert
  • San Francisco Invitational Regatta Results. by Jeff Stobbe
  • US VMYG National Regatta Report. by Alan Suydam
  • Pond Yacht Building Course. by Thom McLaughlin
  • Technical Supplement – Excerpts from Thomas Moore’s Build a Winning Model Yacht. (1928) Read on usvmyg.org
  • Curved Areas, Versed Sines, Trochoids, and the Wave Theory. by Earl Boebert Read on usvmyg.org

Volume 3, Number 1 – Spring 1999

  • Vintage M Coordinator Report. by Charles Roden – proposed rule changes
  • Vintage Northwest. by Rod Carr
  • Daisy: History and development of vane steered cutter. by Jonathon Klinghorn
  • Old A Boat to Be Sailing Soon . by Stan E. Delo
  • Sailing Spreckels Lake. by Jeff Stobbe
  • Camelot East Regatta a Great Success. by Milt Thrasher
  • Book Review. Sunday Sailors. A Beginners Guide to Pond Boats and Model Yachting Until the 1950’s (Don Kihlstrom). by John Snow
  • A Few Comments on Jibs. by Charlie Roden
  • The Ancient Mariner Answers Your Questions
  • Speed Rigging (Braine steering) by George Baron (1937)
  • Vane steered free sail boats by Charles Farley (1945)

Volume 2, Number 3 – Winter 1998/99

  • We Attend Christchurch’s 100 th . by Earl Boebert
  • Features of an “ideal” Pond Boat. by George Steele
  • Magic – Dedicated to All Model Yacht Wives. by Jeanne Stout Burke
  • This Old Pilot Schooner. by Harry Mote
  • Vintage Marblehead Coordinators Report. by Charlie Roden
  • How Smooth Does Your Bottom Have to Be? by Charlie Roden
  • The Ancient Mariner Answers Design Questions
  • Sailboat Lifter/Launcher. by Jim Gray
  • Book Review. Pond Models – Some Simple Thoughts on Building and Sailing Them (M. de Lesseps). by Thom McLaughlin
  • A Simple Self Tacking Vane. by Earl Boebert

Volume 2, Number 2 – Summer 1998

  • A Birthday Bash: The San Francisco Model Yacht Club Turns 100. by Dominic Meo, III
  • Mill Pond Centennial 1998, Port Washington, Long Island, New York. by Jim Dolan and John Snow
  • Free Sailing. by George Steele
  • A Proposal for a New Event. by Earl Boebert
  • What Should We Call That? by Rod Carr
  • More on Rudders and Flaps. by Russell Potts
  • Foam Board as an Aid to Construction. by Jim Gray
  • An Old Pilot Schooner. by Helvig Dronquist

Volume 2, Number 1 – Spring 1998

  • Book Review – Model Sailing Yachts by W. J. Daniels and H. B.  Tucker (1951). by Chris Cafiero
  • Traditional Sailing Craft/Scale Model Regatta. by Harry Mote
  • More on Rudders and Flaps. by Earl Boebert, Harry Mote, and Grant Slinn
  • The San Francisco Model Yacht Club – Model Yachting in California. by Chester Chapman (1903)
  • History of San Francisco Model Yacht Club. by Don Lyon (1945)
  • A Profile of Don R. Lyon. by C. G. Gallagher (1948)
  • Stop Burning Your Fingers. by Ian Scott
  • Silver Soldering. by Earl Boebert
  • Swaged Fittings for Model Yachts. by Jim Gray
  • A Twenty-Five-inch Sailing Sloop (building plans) designed and described. by Claude Horst

Volume 1, Number 3 – Winter 1997-1998

  • American Model Yachting Publishing (1971–1997). by Rod Carr
  • 1997 Vintage Activities Summary. by John Snow
  • Southeast Area Vintage Comments. by Thom McLaughlin
  • Martha’s Vineyard Free-Sailed Model Yacht Regatta. by Jim Dolan and John Snow
  • Vintage “M” (VM) Class design rules. by John Snow
  • Starlet . by John Black (1942) – detailed construction plans and instructions for “a 36/600 vintage sharpie

Volume 1, Number 2 – Summer 1997

  • R/C Vintage “M” Class Racing Rules Format for Redd’s Pond. by Earl Boebert
  • R/C for Vintage Yachts. by Joe Frasier – basic guidelines, prior planning, components, construction, rigging, antenna
  • Woods Hole Model Boat Show. by Jim Dolan and John Snow – a description of experiences and exhibits at this bi- annual model yacht exposition
  • Redd’s Pond. by Jim Dolan and John Snow – a history of Redd’s Pond starting in the 1600s
  • The Myth of the Bounteous Board. by Charlie Roden – incidents at the WoodenBoat Show

Volume 1, Number 1 – Spring 1997

  • Building and Sailing the Cheerio. by Alan Suydam
  • Toy Yachts and Yachty Characters. by Charley Williamson
  • What Do You Want? Information… by Earl Boebert – Gus Lassel, Ted Houk, Mill Pond MYC
  • New US VMYG Division: Traditional Sailing Craft. by Harry Mote –  R/C Schooner Racing and Display Rules; Traditional Sailing Craft Scale Models; Schooners; Argonauts R/C  Schooner Fleet; R/C Scratch-built, Plank on Frame Schooners with Bulbs and Large Rudders Permitted; R/C Fiberglass Schooner Hulls Scratch Completed with Bulbs and Large Rudders Permitted
  • Zip A Marblehead Class Model Racing Yacht. by George Baron.

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  • Restoration of an old yacht, possibly 36R of pond yacht pedigree..?

Author Topic: Restoration of an old yacht, possibly 36R of pond yacht pedigree..?  (Read 28641 times)

  • Full Mayhemer
  • Posts: 1,016
  • North Devon
  • Location: North Devon
  • Location: Bury, Lancashire.

Re: Restoration of an old yacht, possibly 36R of pond yacht pedigree..?

The Vintage Model Yacht Group may be a source of information. http://www.vmyg.org.uk/
Seeing the quadrant in the photographs, was a braine steering system used? Are your restoration plans for braine, vane or r/c. Tony.
  • Location: Geldern, Germany, previously Xanten.
What a lovely Project! I think these old hulls were so graceful, my new Club is purely Racing, IOM and Marbleheads and is speed at any price! Still they have a nice water only 10 minutes away and they are friendly enough, when not racing that is!!
  • Location: Tasmania, Australia
@ArtistMike: Thinking that it would pay to check that the rudder tube through the hull is intact and waterproof as well while in that area. You mention that the rudder can lift off the pintle, presumably meaning there is a bit of slap in the rudder shaft - should not be a problem if the rudder tube is continuous through the hull. However does this mean that the rudder could lift off while sailing? There may be times during sailing when the rudder experiences some upward thrust.... if it came out of the pintle while at sea things could get ugly...
  • Posts: 3,417
  • Location: S.W. Herts
As far as RC operation of the rudder goes, with the various lines and elastic going to the Braine quadrant a couple more lines to the quadrant won't notice going to a servo.  The lines can be taken in through tubes into a deck hatch or via tubes mounted on deck.  I used curved tubes instead of pulleys, cheaper too!  Never had any wear on the tubes either even with monofilament line. The rudder servo lines can be hooked into the holes in the quadrant at the working end easily disconnected when not needed. very interesting look forward to the continuing saga. regards Roy
I am guessing the foredeck holes in pairs (circled in green) may be for a bowsprit. The hole circled in red is more likely location for jib attachment point I would think. Hole at bow tip (yellow circle) may be for a forestay?
Hi don't mean to be pushy but does this picture of the Braine diagram help? regards Roy
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Braine steering gear A J Fisher pond yacht

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Braine steering gear A J Fisher pond yacht

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YACHT TERMINOLOGY

Do you find understanding the names for parts of a yacht confusing? At Britannia Pond Yachts we have tried to help you understand using diagrams that detail the terms used for the anatomy of a yacht.

Britannia Pond Yachts Anatomy of a yacht

View Port Side

View at Stern

Sails are the engine of the yacht they are in effect like an aircraft wing, airflow creates positive and negative pressure on different sides of the sail thus providing forward momentum. The size and shape of the sails fitted to your model have been carefully considered to achieve the best performance. The sails have been tested under light air conditions as well as strong winds. The

leading edge of both mainsail and Jib is termed the Luff whilst the trailing edge is termed the Leech. The top of both types of sail is known as the Head whilst the bottom corner at the leading edge is termed the Tack and the bottom corner of the sail at the trailing edge is termed the Clew. ​

Sails.png

Diagram to show sail terminology

On every sailing yacht, (no matter how large or how small) the forces generated by wind on the sails are imparted through the mast and mast foot which is then carried through the deck to the hull thus providing forward motion. It is fair to say that the hull of every yacht has been carefully shaped to cut through the water with ease. All hulls consist of a shaped vessel on to which the deck is fixed, the deck supports the mast, steering gear, and fittings to control the sails. The sides of the hull are referred to as the bilge these were curved in traditional wooden boats . 

The intersection of the bilge with the deck is referred to as the Gunwale above this a toe board is sometimes fitted. Some hulls are constructed using sheets of ply fixed to formers which provide flat surfaces this hull type is known as a hard chine hull The underside of a hull is termed the keel, all keels are fitted with a fin to help balance the yacht under sail, the hull also houses the skeg, rudder, and tiller which are fitted to the stern end of the yacht.

Victorian Beam Trawler.jpeg

A Victorian Felixstowe Beam Trawler pond yacht, B ilge,Gunwale and

Toe Rails can be clearly seen.

Mast, Boom and Deck Fittings.

The terminology of these fittings will vary over time and even geographically so some of the names and spellings used for fittings may vary from country to country. You may note that item 21 listed below we would now term as a Bowsie and not as a Bowser. Item 11 we would now spell as Gunwale. Also spars fitted at the foot of the sail are now referred to as booms. Some older yacht designs were fitted with bowsprits these helped  to increase the boats sail ar ea but bowsprits have now been superseded by the use of much taller masts and high aspect sails on racing yachts. Shown below is a diagram by AJ Fisher from 1950 labeling the fittings found on the spars and the deck of a sailing yacht. A J Fisher was a supplier of quality brass model yacht fittings. Item 3 termed quadrant is part of a self-steering mechanism termed Braine Gear and is named after its inventor George Braine in the late 19th Century.

Arrangement of Spar and Deck Fittings.pn

About Braine Gear.

Before self steering, the process of steering a model yacht was a very haphazard affair, ideas included using a weighted rudder fitted with interchangeable lead weights, but this offered very limited success . In 1904 Mr George Braine of Kensington Gardens Model Yacht Sailing Association first had the idea of implementing an automatic tiller hence the term Braine gear. Braine gear takes various forms but simply it consists of a quadrant fitted to the rudder post. The quadrant pulls steering lines (sheets) that are carefully arranged so that they will cross over each other through eyelets, these are then connected to the mainsail boom using running lines off the jack line and beating sheet which is hooked over the traveller. 

How Braine Gear works.

The principle of the gear is based on the notion that wind will exert pressure on the mainsail and hence the mainsail boom, as the boom swings over the windward line attached to the quadrant will then pull the the leeward side of the quadrant and hence turn the rudder, this  prevents the yacht from running into the wind. When the boat puts about on the opposite tack the slack leeward line becomes taut and pulls the rudder in the opposite direction and so on.  

The steering quadrant will have been made with a series of holes drilled in each arm, these holes allows the steering lines to be connected using quadrant hooks which enable leverage to be imparted on the quadrant and hence the rudder angle, this is altered by moving the hooks in the holes to suit the prevailing wind conditions. To self centre the rudder a flexible cord (damper) is fitted this is usually a piece of elasticated cord or flight rubber. The elastic is fixed to an eyelet at the stern and then passes through the eye under the quadrant which is then tied to a line fixed to an eyelet behind the mast, the tension is controlled using a bowsie. This then ensures that the rudder always returns to the centre. If the rudder post offers any resista nce in the  housing then the efficiency of the device will be impaired and may not self centre.

Using Braine Gear.

If the air is light and the yacht keeps off wind then it is likely that the elastic  will need tightening, but under the same conditions the boat turns into the wind then the elastic is set too tight. However if the wind freshens and the boat keeps off wind, then less leverage on the quadrant is required, adjust this by moving the hooks inboard. Under the same conditions the yacht turns into the wind then more leverage is required to do this move the hooks out to the ends of the quadrant arms. Once the correct settings have been found they will remain for all time, it is therefore suggested that notes are taken of the various settings under the different conditions so that the settings can be replicated as needed. Adjustments should only be made in small steps, do not be discouraged at first as only practise will make your steering performance improve. Braine gear is not required when beating or sailing into the wind, in these conditions a well made yacht should steer using sail trim alone. So when beating into the wind, slacken off the steering lines and attach the beating sheet to the main traveller. It is rare to find model sailing yachts fitted with a steering mechanism under 20 inches long, however it is known that at least one Edwardian yacht fitted has been fitted with steering gear that was only 12 inches long!

Braine gear Britannia Pond Yachts.png

A version of Braine self steering gear fitted to a racing yacht, a quadrant arm limiter has also been fitted to this yacht.

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braine steering gear model yachts

Braine and Vane Steering Drawings Model Boat Plan

Braine and Vane Steering Drawings Model Boat Plan

  • Description

Two sheets showing full working drawings for a variety of steering and sail control devices for vintage, restored and replica yachts of all types. Most diagrams fully dimensioned for reproduction by competent model makers. Designed by G W Clark. Featured in: Free Plans MMI July 2001 3 Star Difficulty Rating

Braine and Vane Steering Drawings Model Boat Plan

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COMMENTS

  1. Braine Gear

    How to sail using Brain automatic steering gear.

  2. Braine gear

    Braine gear. THE earliest model yachts had no steering gear whatsoever, and consequently were unable to sail a good course when the wind was anywhere abaft the beam. The first steering gears to come into use were weighted rudders, and though these were better than nothing at all, it was not until 1906 that the first efficient steering gear was ...

  3. Free Sailing

    If you wonder how model yachts sailed before the days of radio control, the answer was: quite nicely, thank you. ... The Braine Gear. Fig. 2. Diagram of a Braine Gear. ... The vane gear for self-steering was invented by Nathanael Herreshoff in 1875. The idea laid more or less dormant in both model and full-scale practice

  4. BRAINE AND VANE STEERING

    BRAINE AND VANE STEERING. SKU: MAR2863 Categories: Engineering, Marine, Sailing Boats & Yachts. Two sheets showing full working drawings for a variety of steering and sail control devices for vintage restored and replica yachts of all types.Most diagrams are fully dimensioned for reproduction by competent model makers.Designed by G W Clark.

  5. B 30

    B 30. Price from: £800 + PP. The B30 is a very pretty free sailing yacht fitted with Braine steering gear that will allow you to sail on all courses of sail. It is a classic 1930s design with small over-hangings and a large flat fin for straight line stability. Her hollow hull is hand carved using the traditional bread and butter method of ...

  6. Self-steering gear

    Before the advent of radio control, model yacht racing (started before WW1) was typically contested on long narrow ponds, and the number of stops along the banks was counted as a penalty in the final result. ... George Braine. The Braine steering gear was a fine-tuned system of quadrant on the rudder stock driven by the tension of the mainsail ...

  7. Braine Gear suitable for 22 in- 30in yachts

    Braine Gear for 22in - 30in in free sailing Yachts. Engineered from solid brass with sheet hooks, 50cm rubber cord, 1 x Bowsie, 2 X small screw-eyes for rubber adjuster and 2 X large screw-eyes for sheet fairleaders.

  8. Vintage Model pond yacht Braine steering quadrant gear by Grove Pond

    Braine Steering Gear Kit suitable for yachts up to 40in long. Ideal for vintage free sailing 36R class yachts. Supplied with 2 quick change sheeting hooks, 50cm of rubber centering cord, 2 small screw eyes for centering rubber, 2 large screw eyes for the main sail sheets. Engineered from Solid Brass to a well proven design the Braine Steering ...

  9. Vane self-steering gear

    This principle of wind-vane-operated gear was introduced in the mid-1920s to control model racing yachts while sailing downwind. Known as the Braine gear, after the name of its inventor, it proved highly effective, and in the model-yacht-racing world quickly superseded the older hit-and-miss contrivances with weights and springs then in use.

  10. Bonhams : A six meter Pond Yacht, 'Isabella' Inverleith Model Yacht

    These yachts, built on a scale of 1 2/2" = 1' using the standard six meter mathematical formula, were famously known as 'Scottish Wee Sixes'. The Braine steering gear was devised by the late George Braine of the London Model Yacht Club in the early 1900's.

  11. CSYSFormatted

    Earl Boebert, U.S. Vintage Model Yacht Group, Albuquerque New Mexico USA Ted Houk's Rip Tide ... Two forms of self-steering mechanisms were used. Prior to World War II, the dominant mechanism was a ... Boats equipped with Braine gear sail to windward on rig balance alone. Boats equipped with self-tacking vane gear have a

  12. Braine Gear

    Restored 3 foot free sailing yacht. Was probably originally built in the late 1950s or 1960s. The original sails were nylon painted with varnish. They were very fragile breaking up with holes in the sails when I took the the model on, but there as enough of the sails to make a rough template. The new sails were made from red kite ripstop nylon ...

  13. TMY Index

    Steering Gear for Model Yachts. by G. Rhodes (1903) Volume 17, Number 1 Spring 2015. ... Speed Rigging (Braine steering) by George Baron (1937) Vane steered free sail boats by Charles Farley (1945) Volume 2, Number 3 - Winter 1998/99. We Attend Christchurch's 100 th. by Earl Boebert;

  14. Restoration of an old yacht, possibly 36R of pond yacht pedigree..?

    Model Boat Mayhem > The Shipyard ( Dry ... was a braine steering system used? Are your restoration plans for braine, vane or r/c. ... This design definitely harks back to earlier pond yacht designs, but with Braine gear , yet it conforms to the 36R rule as far as size of hull is concerned although the hull again has the lovely overhangs fore ...

  15. Braine Gear sutable for 30in-50In yachts

    Braine Gear sutable for 30in-50In yachts. £31.00. Braine Gear for 30in -50in free sailing Yachts. Engineered from solid brass with sheet hooks, 50cm rubber cord, 1 x Bowsie, 2 X small screw-eyes for rubber adjuster and 2 X large screw-eyes for sheet fairleaders. Purchase. Share. Braine Gear for 30in -50in free sailing Yachts. Engineered from ...

  16. Braine steering gear A J Fisher pond yacht

    Tags: Braine steering gear more » A J Fisher pond yacht model sailboat boat children boy girl beach waves sunshine playing fun water summer time sun sea toy wooden ship miniature antique old vintage lake pool regatta adolescence fashioned park people spectators watercraft youth group sailing race mast boom keel hull child « less

  17. Braine Steering Quadrant for Vintage Model Yacht

    Braine steering gear was invented in 1904 by George Braine, a revered member of London âe(tm)s Kensington Gardens Model Yacht Sailing Association. This simple but effective self-steering system was used very extensively on both competition and recreational boats. ... Key Words: Model Yacht, Pond Boat, Jacrim, Seaworthy, Model Sailboat ...

  18. YACHT TERMINOLOGY

    Item 3 termed quadrant is part of a self-steering mechanism termed Braine Gear and is named after its inventor George Braine in the late 19th Century. About Braine Gear. Before self steering, the process of steering a model yacht was a very haphazard affair, ideas included using a weighted rudder fitted with interchangeable lead weights, but ...

  19. Braine and Vane Steering Drawings Model Boat Plan

    Braine and Vane Steering Drawings Model Boat Plan. £17.00 each. Approx: €16.44 / US$18.00 Tax Free. In stock. Marine Modelling International. Part No: MAR2863. Ask a question. Email a friend ... Address Cornwall Model Boats Ltd Unit 3B, Highfield Rd Ind Est Camelford Cornwall PL32 9RA United Kingdom. phone 01840 211009.

  20. Braine Steering Quadrant for Vintage Model Yacht

    We are pleased to offer several model yacht fittings thatare suitable for the restoration of vintage boats (please see our other items). This auction is for a Braine type self steering quadrant that i

  21. 1930 Marblehead Pond Yacht

    Explore this beautiful classic wooden model boat with brass hardware and a green body. Perfect for sailing enthusiasts and collectors.

  22. Braine Steering Gear A J Fisher Pond Yacht

    Miniature Model. www.vmyg.org.uk pages resources plans braine.htm. /. Вадим. Explore a stunning model sailboat, inspired by the elegance of sailing ships. Check out this wooden model boat built with craftsmanship and precision. Get inspired by the beauty of model sailing ships and embark on your own DIY boat building adventure.