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ICC: What's the actual 24m limit?

  • Thread starter Balearick
  • Start date 13 Sep 2011
  • 13 Sep 2011

Balearick

I am looking to upgrade my boat soon(ish) and my choice is down to 2 boats, one just under the ICC 24m length limit at 22.5 (74ft) and one a tad over at 28.6m (94ft). I really like the 28.6m boat but I only hold an ICC "up to 24m" - so that means I'd have to get a Yachtmaster Coastal... or does it... What exactly is the length that is measured for the license purpose? Is it overall anchor to end-of-swim-platform, gun rail to transom, or the hull at waterline length? I'm rather hoping someone will say "hull at waterline" so I can get away with just my 24m ICC... I so hate courses and tests.  

Wiggo

YM Coastal and Offshore is the same 24m/200grt limit, I think...  

Imperial One

Imperial One

Active member.

Wiggo said: YM Coastal and Offshore is the same 24m/200grt limit, I think... Click to expand...

oceanfroggie

oceanfroggie

Well-known member.

Does the length limit not only apply to "commercial" vessels once under the weight?  

jfm

The 24m is complex. It is "load line length", which is neither LOA nor w/l length I have read the rules many times but do not fully understnad them, and i have never met a surveyor who does. Plenty claim to, but cannot fit their claims to the exact words of the rules. The rules say LLL is the greater of: (i) 96% of the total length on a waterline at 85% of the least moulded depth measured from the top of the keel, and (ii) the length from the foreside of the stem to the axis of the rudder stock on that waterline. As a matter of English language, I don't know what "least moulded depth" is. i can guess, but that isn't the same. The words do not convey a precise meaning that I can see. I therefore interpret (i), with caution, as 96% of w/l length. (ii) is similarly hard to be sure about, but I take it as 96% of w/line length measured only as far back as the rudder stock, and therefore not relevant to mobos usually becuase (i) will generally trump it So (i) is the test, 96% of w/l length BUT the word "length" also carries its own definition, and helpfully it is: "the overall length from the foreside of the foremost fixed permanent structure to the aftside of the aftermost fixed permanent structure of the vessel". So you exclude swim platform, pulpits, davits, rubbing strakes, etc. Several manufacturers make the front nosecone of a mobo removeable to take a metre off the "length". Ferretti 830 does this, for example. You need to examine the boat carefully. HOWEVER, if LLL is measured only on a waterline, why would they go to the trouble of making a removeable nosecone? And why do the rules specifically tell you not to count the pulpit? VERY hard to fathom... The text of the rules is at pp 22 and 23 of this doc but as i say be careful to distinguish between guesses and reasoned interpetation Anyway, 94 foot is borderline. It can be done, but not all builders will do it. Sunseeker are good at it, and iirc (I might be wrong) even got the 105 below 24m LLL. Tell us the model of boat for more info or at least some guesses, but if you are right on the borderline do not just beleive what anyone tells you becuase the rules are complex and many surveyors probably don't know either. Good luck!  

jfm said: The 24m is complex. It is "load line length", which is neither LOA nor w/l length I have read the rules many times but do not fully understnad them, and i have never met a surveyor who does. Plenty claim to, but cannot fit their claims to the exact words of the rules. The rules say LLL is the greater of: (i) 96% of the total length on a waterline at 85% of the least moulded depth measured from the top of the keel, and (ii) the length from the foreside of the stem to the axis of the rudder stock on that waterline. As a matter of English language, I don't know what "least moulded depth" is. i can guess, but that isn't the same. The words do not convey a precise meaning that I can see. I therefore interpret (i), with caution, as 96% of w/l length. (ii) is similarly hard to be sure about, but I take it as 96% of w/line length measured only as far back as the rudder stock, and therefore not relevant to mobos usually becuase (i) will generally trump it So (i) is the test, 96% of w/l length BUT the word "length" also carries its own definition, and helpfully it is: "the overall length from the foreside of the foremost fixed permanent structure to the aftside of the aftermost fixed permanent structure of the vessel". So you exclude swim platform, pulpits, davits, rubbing strakes, etc. Several manufacturers make the front nosecone of a mobo removeable to take a metre off the "length". Ferretti 830 does this, for example. You need to examine the boat carefully. HOWEVER, if LLL is measured only on a waterline, why would they go to the trouble of making a removeable nosecone? And why do the rules specifically tell you not to count the pulpit? VERY hard to fathom... The text of the rules is at pp 22 and 23 of this doc but as i say be careful to distinguish between guesses and reasoned interpetation Anyway, 94 foot is borderline. It can be done, but not all builders will do it. Sunseeker are good at it, and iirc (I might be wrong) even got the 105 below 24m LLL. Tell us the model of boat for more info or at least some guesses, but if you are right on the borderline do not just beleive what anyone tells you becuase the rules are complex and many surveyors probably don't know either. Good luck! Click to expand...
Balearick said: The boat is a Couach 2800 Open. LOA 28.60m. Couach says "Hull length: 26.60m" meaning (I guess) the swim platform is 2m. If I interpret your definition of LLL a bit loosely and hope the police in the Med would too I can possibly squeeze 28.60m LOA to fit 24m LLL... I'm reading that doc now. Click to expand...
  • 14 Sep 2011
smee said: Actually its 200grt with no length limit for YM Offshore (and probably the Coastal too!). Click to expand...
jfm said: Lovely boat! Yup, applying some sensible guesswork and scaling the website drawings the swim platform and pulpit together are 2m so the hull is 26.6 Then you have the "85%" rule. I think (not 1005 sure, and wording isn't clear) this means you look at the boat in profile, find the lowest point of the deep V keel (which you have to guess, becuase the u/w is not shown on the website) then from there you go upwards to 85% of the way to the lowest gunwhale (aka "least moulded depth"). Now, you want the gunwhale to be as low as poss for this test. You might get surveyor to accept it is where the scuppers are, where the top of the blue paint joins the white on the web picm mainly because if you have open transom gates (tube construction I mean) that must be the right answer. Let's suppose the gunwhale is indeed there. 85% then seems to me to remove another 1.5-1.8m of length based on the angle of the stem, but not 2.6m. Ergo the boat looks >24m LLL to me It therefore needs a removeable nosecone a la Ferretti to achieve <24m, but afaik Couach don't do that trick. Hence if you need it to be <24m I would check very carefully before contracting to buy it. Click to expand...
Balearick said: Great stuff, thanks! I have a lot of variables that need to fall into place before buying this particular Couach boat, the biggest one being that the vendor's agent just told me this morning there's another offer on it (didn't say whether it was acceptable though, he's trying to hurry me up but I can't hurry on this one). I'll try asking my insurance company (Seippel and Light) about it, make sure they'll insure me to skipper it with my ICC. If I lose this 2800 Open I'll be sad but it's not the end of the world as my other choice is a Squadron 74, which I'm sure you'll agree is a great choice and no ICC issues there... (I can't actually afford a new Squadron 74 so it's going to have to be a 2005/6/7-something) Click to expand...
Wiggo said: Jfm, if you do go over the limit, what certificates do you require, do you know? I'm guessing it depends on country of flagging, country of operation and nationality of skipper. For example, a British flagged 28m boat with a British skipper based in SoF... Click to expand...

MrB

I found this www.dft.gov.uk/mca/msn_1792_edition_2.pdf really informative when i was looking at how many crew were required and licencing requirements for yachts over 24m. I think it is mainly commercial stuff but does reference "Yachts for pleasure only".  

  • 15 Sep 2011
jfm said: But reference my post above, I think i forgot the 96% factor. If you apply the guesswork in my post, the hull is 26.6, then you knock off 1.5m-1.8m at the stem becuase you're measuring along a waterline that is 85% of the way up from the keel to the transom gate openings. That's say 25.0m. THEN you multiply by .96, which I forgot to do, and that gets you to 24. Hey presto. Now, when you're that close, you can be pretty sure the shipyard have made sure it is 23.99. No shipyard in its right mind would build a boat 24.1 or 24.2. So I'm feeling much more hopeful that Balearick's Couach is indeed <24m LLL. Seems to stand to reason to me So go for it Balearick! Click to expand...

Not wishing to rain on your parade, but that info is confusing. The Gross Tonnage is calculated on volume ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gross_tonnage ) If you use a really simple model of a 24m hull then it is made up of half a cylinder, 6m in diameter and 16m long (the bulk of the hull) with half an 8m cone on the front. Add to that a 1m thick triangular wedge at the front (above the half cone) and a rectangular slab 16m x 6m x 1m high to represent the rest of the superstructure. That comes out to a volume of 610 cubic metres. Applying the formula from Wikipedia, V=610 and K=0.255, so the Gross Tonnage for a rather crudely modelled 24 m boat is approximately 156 tonnes.  

  • 16 Sep 2011

Doug_Stormforce

Nick_H

Balearick None of my business, but your shortlist is unusual to say the least. There's a world of difference between a 28m hardtop with surface drives and a 22m flybridge with shafts, and they would normally be bought by different types of buyers wanting different things from their boating. If the Coauch is the type of boat you really want, but you miss out on the one you're looking at, then why not look for a similar boat like a Leopard, Mangusta, etc, or even a SS Predator?  

henryf

Aha! Found it at last. The following is from the RYA website: The standard commercial endorsement allows you work on board British flagged vessels subject to the MCA's codes of practice for small commercial vessels. The following wording would appear on your certificate: For Yachtmaster Offshore and Yachtmaster Ocean Certificates of Competence: This certificate is valid for use as a Master of yachts of up to 200gt on commercially and privately registered yachts until (date of expiry). For Powerboat Level 2, Powerboat Advanced, Day Skipper and Yachtmaster Coastal Certificates of Competence: Valid for vessels of up to 24 metres in length used for commercial purposes subject to the codes of practice issued by the MCA until (date of expiry). These only relate to the commercial endorsements, which implies that there is no limit for private pleasure use, but that's UK regulations only. The regular (non-commercial) YM Coastal and Offshore exams just get you an RYA certificate with no mention of restrictions. The ICC merely states that you have reached a minimum standard of competence as recognised by the RYA, but it is up to the other country as to whether they choose to recognise it. So if you are over 24m and British flagged, I guess to avoid the possibility of falling foul of local laws you would need a commercial endorsement on a YM Offshore. And that only covers you to 200gt - anything over 200gt and you are into MCA Officer of the Watch, Chief Mate or Master quals.  

tinkicker0

For Powerboat Level 2, Powerboat Advanced, Day Skipper and Yachtmaster Coastal Certificates of Competence: Valid for vessels of up to 24 metres in length used for commercial purposes subject to the codes of practice issued by the MCA until (date of expiry). Interesting thread. Smallish drift though : Thought RYA PB2 and the accompanying ICC obtained from it only covered up to 10m? I'm sure that's what it states on mine, although not had it out of the drawer for many a moon.  

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Which certificate to become a skipper? Capitaine 200, Yachtmaster or Master Commercial Yachting 200 GT

skipper professionnel a la barre d'un voilier captnboat

The profession of skipper is demanding and highly regulated. It must meet strict training requirements depending on the type of mission, the flag of the boat…

So which certificate should you choose to become a professional skipper and practice according to the rules? To give you an idea of the different possibilities, we present you with 3 major command titles that are widespread in Europe. These are the Capitaine 200 (French title), the Yachtmaster (English certificate limited to yachting) and the Master Commercial Yachting 200 GT (Belgian title). 

Advantages and disadvantages, price and training center, we explain everything!

1. Becoming a professional skipper: a regulated profession

A. skipper, a position of great responsibility.

The skipper (or captain) is in charge of driving the boat. He is the “chief on board”, and must ensure order and safety, while carrying out his mission: charter, coaching or boat delivery. 

As a ship’s captain, he has an important responsibility in the good realization of a navigation. He is the one who will decide on the maneuvers, itineraries and behaviors to adopt in order to guarantee the safety of the passengers and the boat. 

From this responsibility and from the skills required to drive a boat, the obligation to justify maritime professional training titles arises . This obligation is necessary to exercise the profession of skipper on a commercial basis, which means for remuneration. 

B. The training obligations of a professional skipper

In order to sell his services as a skipper, the latter must justify the qualifications and trainings required to carry out the mission.

The training requirements depend on several parameters, including the type of boat (motor or sail), the flag and tonnage of the boat , the type of mission (boat delivery, charter or coaching)…

We are going to present you the 3 most common certificates to be a professional skipper on pleasure boats.

2. Capitaine 200, Yachtmaster and Commercial Yachting Master 200 GT, 3 options to become a professional skipper

A. the capitaine 200.

The Capitaine 200 title, issued by the Merchant Navy, is the most common on France.

The Capitaine 200 is a professional navigation title that allows you to sail as a skipper on motorboats up to 200 gross tons , which means medium-sized boats (~24 meters). It is limited to 20 miles from the coast .

With its “Sailing” module , the Capitaine 200 also allows to drive sailing boats without any distance limitation from the coast . 

In addition to the Capitaine 200 , there are some mandatory complementary training courses :

  • A Basic Safety Training (BST)
  • At least a Restricted Operator Certificate (ROC)
  • A Medical Training Certificate (EM1, 2 ,3)
  • A Medical Checkup (ENG1)

➡️ Without these training courses, the Capitaine 200 , such as the Capitaine 200 “Sailing”, cannot be effective. 

- Advantages of the Capitaine 200

The Capitaine 200 allows to work commercially on boats waving the French flag. Its limitation of 200 UMS allows to cover the majority of the French fleet and offers to skippers many possibilities of navigation.

In addition, the Capitaine 200 is an STCW certificate , which means that a skipper holding a Capitaine 200 can easily work on foreign flags (especially under flags whose country is a signatory of the STCW Convention: Italy, Spain, Greece, Croatia…). Some countries that are signatories to this Convention can request a visa recognition . This is notably the case of the United Kingdom.

marins professionnels manoeuvrant sur un voilier captnboat

- Disadvantages of the Capitaine 200

The training to obtain this navigation title is quite expensive : between 6 000 to 10 000 €; and requires a significant investment in time (~12 weeks to follow the 5 training modules). Moreover, once the Capitaine 200 title is obtained, it is necessary to justify 12 months of effective navigation (as second in command, seaman or other) to “patent” the title and be able to exercise the function of Captain.

The prerogatives of the Capitaine 200 are limited to motorboats. The “Sailing” module is required to work on a sailboat.

⚠ Please note 1: The Capitaine 200 as well as the additionnal training courses must be renewed globally every 5 years. The revalidation/recycling of these titles has a significant cost: between 150 and 1 000 € depending on the title to renew.

⚠ Please note 2: Merchant Navy certificates do not allow you to work as a sailing instructor. For these types of missions, the French regulations require state diplomas: BPJEPS, BEE, DEJEPS…

- Where to take the training to obtain the Capitaine 200?

There are many schools and training centers approved to take the Capitaine 200 in France. For example, La Macif in Marseille, the Ecole de Formations Maritimes (EFM) in Les Sables d’Olonne, the Centre Européen de Formation Continue Maritime in Concarneau… Simply register for the proposed sessions.

The Capitaine 200 can be financed, in whole or in part, by the PTA (Personal Training Account, CPF in French). 

The Capitaine 200 is delivered by the French Maritime Affairs.

B. The Yachtmaster

The most common title for working internationally is the Yachtmaster. Indeed, the Yachtmaster is an English title of the Royal Yachting Association (RYA), recognized by the Maritime Coastguard Agency (MCA). It is valid for all the territories of the British crown, the Red Flag; and thus in many countries of the world . It allows skippers to command pleasure boats up to 24 meters long, without distance limitation with the Ocean extension. It has 3 levels, each with limitations: Coastal (60 Nm), Offshore (150 Nm), and Ocean .

The Yachtmaster must be completed with a “Commercially Endorsed” mention to be used on commercial services and to be professionally recognized internationally. To obtain this endorsement, the skipper must obtain the Professional Practices and Responsibilities (PPR) certificate, the Basic Safety Training (BST), and the MCA Medical Examination (ENG1) .

With a Yachtmaster, seamen can perform charter and boat delivery missions as well as training/coaching missions.

- Advantages of the Yachtmaster:

A large part of the pleasure boats in the world are under British flag or Red Flag (Bermuda, BVIs, Jersey…). Having an English certificate opens the doors to international yachting.

The cost of the training to obtain a Yachtmaster is less expensive than the Capitaine 200 “Sailing”: count between 2 200 and 2 500 €.

The title of Yachtmaster being acquired for life , it allows you to work for private shipowners under the Red Flag without any renewal. However, the additional training courses (BST, ENG1…) must be renewed respectively every 5 and 2 years to renew the Commercial Endorsement which allows international recognition . Overall, this is a big saving compared to the Capitaine 200 certificate.

The Yachtmaster is an exam without any previous training. Although weeks of training are highly recommended, it can be taken very quickly for experienced seamen who wish to become more professional.

The Yachtmaster takes into account the sailing experience gained prior to the exam to allow immediate access to the job of Captain without the need to validate sea time with a lower position (as for the Capitaine 200 ).

The training to obtain this title is 100% in English , which allows you to acquire and justify a sufficient level of English to maneuver a boat.

voilier-mer-skipper-professionnel

B. Disadvantages of the Yachtmaster

The Yachtmaster is not recognized by the French State and some other countries as a command title. It cannot be the subject of a visa recognition as it stands; and therefore cannot be used to work on the flags of these countries.

⚠ Please note 1: The Master 200 GT can easily be obtained for seamen who already hold a Yachtmaster. All that is required is to pass the Master 200 GT oral exam. This is a good way to be authorized to work on French flag with a Yachtmaster .

⚠ Please note 2: Visas recognition issued by France are only valid for 5 years , so they must be renewed.

The prerogatives of the Yachtmaster are specific for each title. The Yachtmaster Sailing is required to command a sailboat, while the Yachtmaster Engine is required for a motorboat. 

The Yachtmaster exam is taken completely in English.

- Where to take the training to obtain a Yachtmaster?

To obtain a Yachtmaster, you must pass an exam that includes an assessment of your navigation, maneuvering and safety at sea skills. You must also demonstrate a certain level of English.

The Royal Yachting Association (RYA) is based in the United Kingdom, but it has approved training centers around the world, including France. There are several sailing schools in France that offer Yachtmaster training courses. 

To find an RYA accredited sailing school, you can visit the RYA website which lists all the accredited schools.

C. The Master Commercial Yachting 200 GT

The Master Commercial Yachting 200 GT (C-Yachting 200 GT) is a specific Belgian certificate for vessels up to 200 gross tons. It is a certification title issued by the Belgian Maritime administration that attests to the holder’s ability to command as Captain, navigate safely and manage the crew and passengers of a commercial yacht.

To obtain a Master Commercial Yachting 200 GT, the seaman must first justify a significant navigation experience (or hold a Yachtman…), but also compulsory complementary trainings:

  • A Medical Training Certificate (EM1, 2, 3)

Without these trainings, the Master Commercial Yachting 200 GT cannot be effective.

The Master Commercial Yachting is an STCW qualification recognized by the signatory countries of the Convention to perform boat delivery, charter and coaching missions. 

It is delivered by the approved training institutes.

- Advantages of the Master Commercial Yachting 200 GT

Most European countries and signatories of the STCW Convention recognize Commercial Yachting as such, and do not require a visa recognition. When a visa is required (as is the case in France and the United Kingdom), it is generally very easy to obtain .

The Master Commercial Yachting 200 GT is also a training course delivered in English and can be obtained in 6 months for the most hurried. The exam takes place in Belgium or France.

The Master Commercial Yachting takes into account the sailing experience made before the training. Thus, following the success of the exam, the certificate allows you to immediately exercise the profession of Captain without the need to validate a sea time with a lower position (as for the Capitaine 200 ).

The prerogatives of the Master Commercial Yachting are valid for both sailing and motor vessels .

- Disadvantages of the Master Commercial Yachting 200 GT

If the Master Commercial Yachting 200 GT is a patent recognized by France (unlike the Yachtmaster) and the United Kingdom, it must however be the subject of an application for a visa recognition for these 2 countries. The holders of a Commercial Yachting can therefore work under the French and British flags, subject to applying for a visa recognition.

Part of the exam is in English, which can be both a disadvantage for people who are not comfortable in English and an advantage for a profession that is definitely internationally oriented.

⚠ Please note: The Master Commercial Yachting 200 GT is an STCW certificate; as such, the mandatory additional training courses (GOC/ROC, BST…) must be renewed every 5 years. The holders must then apply for a renewal of the certificate to the competent authority: The Federal Public Service Mobility and Transport .

coucher-soleil-catamaran

- Where to follow the training to obtain a Master Commercial Yachting 200 GT?

In general, the training includes theoretical and practical courses, as well as a certain number of hours of navigation.

The cost of the training will depend on the training organization you choose and the duration of the training. List of Belgian approved training organizations.

Capt’n Boat recommendation: The Yachter

The Yachter is an approved training organization that offers E-learning courses (at home from your computer) that can be adapted to the candidates. Via this organization, you can obtain your Master Commercial Yachting 200 GT (Capitaine Master 200 GT in their website) in minimum 3 months or more depending on your schedule, your constraints… The courses are concrete and the instructors are demanding and caring.

Throughout the training, candidates are supervised by a professional STCW instructor. Private lessons can be arranged as an option as well as a face-to-face session with a mock exam. The Yachter also trains for the Master Commercial Yachting 500 GT (Capitaine Master 500 GT) and Master 500 GT Unlimited (Capitaine Master 500 GT Unlimited).

logo-the-yachter-centre-de-formation-maritime-e-learning

The theoretical exam allows you to obtain the title of Officer Of Watch (OOW200). It takes place over 4 days in France or in Belgium. The practical exam is done in one day on a sailing and/or motor vessel in the South of France.

⚠ Please note: This training is intended for sailors who already have a training title: offshore license, BACPN, Yachtmaster, Capitaine 200 . It is the ideal solution to obtain an additional navigation title and/or start a professional practice .

3. Conclusion

The profession of skipper requires certain skills and qualifications. The Capitaine 200 , the Yachtmaster or the Commercial Yachting Master 200 GT allow each to exercise the position of command on board within certain limitations.

If the Yachtmaster is the most internationally recognized certificate, it is not recognized in France and does not allow you to work on boats waving the French flag.

The Capitaine 200 , completed with its “Sailing” module, is THE French title, however it is long and expensive to obtain.

The Master Commercial Yachting 200 GT , on the other hand, is recognized in France as well as in the United Kingdom, but requires a visa recognition to be effective in these countries.

⛵ So which patent do you opt for?

No matter which patent you choose, on Capt’n Boat we offer missions on all flags (French, English, Italian, Croatian, Greek, Romanian, Polish, US …) and on all types of boats: you will certainly find your hapiness!

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  • Regulations
  • Pleasure craft regs

Pleasure Craft Regulations

The merchant shipping regulations apply to all vessels under the uk flag, in uk waters or operating from uk ports..

Exemptions to the regulations are granted within the legislation. This includes, the size of a vessel, the number of passengers it carries on board and how the vessel is used. These are all factors that determine which of the regulations a vessel must comply with (such as manning requirements or mandatory equipment ).

Definitions

There are many terms used within the merchant shipping regulations to classify vessels.  These are defined in full in the regulations. The following are a selection you may come across:

Pleasure vessels

used for the sport or pleasure of the owner or the immediate family or friends of the owner (read the legal definition of a pleasure vessel );

Class XII vessels

pleasure vessels of 13.7m in [registered*] length and over; (read about Mandatory equipment for Class XII vessels );

* if a boat is registered this will be the length as shown on the certificate of registry. If a boat is not registered, length is measured from the forepart of the stem to the aft side of the head of the stern post or, if no stern post is fitted the fore side of the rudder stock at the point where the rudder passes out of the hull.

Any type of craft which is: 

  • capable of moving under its own mechanical power,
  • used, navigated or situated wholly or partly in or on water, and     
  • capable of being used to carry one or more persons

Intended Pleasure Vessel

The Code of Practice for Intended Pleasure Vessels in Temporary Commercial Use at Sea  (IPV Code) was introduced on 1 January 2019. It allows vessels which are normally used within the definition of a pleasure vessel to be used commercially at sea temporarily, on a self-certification basis subject to certain conditions being met. The IPV Code disapplies the relevant Merchant Shipping Regulations in the circumstances specified in the Code.

Small Commercial Vessel

The Merchant Shipping Regulations generally consider a vessel to be “commercial” if it is used ‘not as a Pleasure Vessel’. If a vessel is operated outside the definition of a Pleasure Vessel and it is not an intended pleasure vessel it must comply with the requirements for commercial vessels. The RYA is a Certifying Authority for Small Commercial Vessels  (SCV).  

Passenger ship

carries more than 12 passengers regardless of its size and use.

The Merchant Shipping (Watercraft) Order 2023

The Merchant Shipping (Watercraft) Order 2023 extends the application of certain provisions of the Merchant Shipping Act 1995 and the Harbours Act 1964 to watercraft. The provision is applied to watercraft, as they apply to ships albeit with modifications in some cases.

If a boat is operated other than as a pleasure vessel it must comply with the relevant regulations For example, the Code of Practice for Intended Pleasure Vessels in Temporary Commercial Use at Sea  or the Codes of Practice for Small Commercial Vessels .

International Conventions

Many of the regulations that apply stem from international conventions.  They are brought into UK law through Merchant Shipping Regulations, such as:

  • International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea (IRPCS or COLREGs) implemented in the UK by the Merchant Shipping (Distress Signals & Prevention of Collisions) Regulations 1996 (SI 1996/75), as amended.
  • Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS) implemented in the UK by the Merchant Shipping (Safety of Navigation) Regulations 2002 (SI 2002/1473), as amended.
  • Marine Pollution (MARPOL)
  • United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS)

If you go boating on or near the coast the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea (IRPCS or COLREGs) will apply to you. The COLREGs, as defined in rule 1, apply to all vessels navigable on the high seas and waters connected to the high seas. 

It is essential you know these rules well enough to be clear when you are the stand on vessel or the give way vessel. You need to know the correct action to take when in close quarters with other vessels and to avoid a collision.

As well as steering and sailing rules, COLREGs dictate what day shapes and navigation lights a vessel must display to indicate the vessel's status to other vessels. COLREGS also determine when and what sound and light signals a vessel is to make.

A sailing vessel under 20m in length can combine the side and stern lights required under COLREGs in a single lantern at or near the top of the mast (a tri-colour). However, using deck level side and stern may help the officer of the watch on a larger vessel identify you against background lights and make it easier for them to establish the distance you are away from them, particularly in inshore waters.

Although it is sufficient for a sailing vessel to just display deck level side and stern lights, the COLREGs allow a sailing vessel to show an all-round red over green light at the top of the mast in conjunction with deck level port, starboard and stern lights. This is another way to remove the ambiguity a tricolour can cause.

Many nautical publications include core information from the COLREGs. The full text of the regulations should be available from any good nautical bookshop. The RYA’s International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea , is written with the pleasure craft skipper in mind with notes to help yachtsmen interpret and apply the rules.

Before you can apply the COLREGs you need to establish whether a potential collision situation exists, what action is expected of the vessels involved, when action should be taken and whether the action of the give-way vessel is sufficient to prevent the collision. A key element in this process is deciding whether the other vessel has seen you.

If the vessel in question is large commercial ship, consider the size of your vessel and the distance it is away from you. If you cannot see the bridge of the ship from your boat, the chances are that the Officer of the Watch on that ship cannot see you!

COLREGs do not give one vessel "right of way" over another. The stand on vessel must also take action if the action of the give way vessel alone is not sufficient to prevent a collision (or if the give way vessel takes no action). All the rules, relevant to a situation must be considered before decisions are made, as must the situation and the handling characteristics of the boats involved.

The MCA has provided guidance on COLREG in Chapter 8 of MGN 599.

There were many issues contributing to the significant loss of life that occurred when the Titanic sank. These were addressed by the Safety of Life at Sea Convention (SOLAS) which is intended to preserve life onboard any ship or craft at sea.

Originally the SOLAS Convention did not apply to vessels of less than 150GT. Such conventions are however periodically reviewed. Since 1 July 2002. SOLAS Chapter V, has applied to “all ships on all voyages” except warships, other government owned or contracted ships and ships navigating solely on the Great Lakes of North America. SOLAS V therefore applies to UK pleasure vessels, although there are many exemptions leaving the following applicable regulations:

  • Regulation 19 - RADAR REFLECTORS
  • Regulation 29 - LIFESAVING SIGNALS
  • Regulation 31 & 32 - DANGER MESSAGES
  • Regulation 33 - DISTRESS MESSAGES  - Distress Situations: Obligations and procedures
  • Regulation 34 - VOYAGE / PASSAGE PLANNING - Safe navigation and avoidance of dangerous situations
  • Regulation 35 - MISUSE OF DISTRESS SIGNALS

Find out more about SOLAS V Regulations .

Along with COLREGs and SOLAS, MARPOL the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships, stems from the United Nations (UN). Specifically for marine matters the International Maritime Organisation (IMO), the UN agency which looks after maritime safety and preventing pollution from ships. A pleasure craft’s obligations under MARPOL are detailed in the Environment area  and holding tanks are discussed within Boating Abroad . The MCA has also provided advice in Chapter 10 of MGN 599 . 

United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) provides a framework for the use of the oceans. It is this convention that defines the territorial waters of a country and whether a vessel is under flag state, coastal state, or port state law. For more information see the law of the sea and the coastal state .

The legislation governing the evidence of competence required for the operation of a pleasure vessel is the Merchant Shipping (Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping) Regulations 2015. The 2015 regulations do not apply to a pleasure vessel which is less than 80 GT or under 24 metres in load line length.

Therefore if your vessel is used within the legal definition of a pleasure vessel and is either less than 24m in load line length or less than 80GT, there is no requirement for you to have a certificate of competence to skipper the vessel in UK territorial waters or on the high seas.

For vessels of  or exceeding 24m in load line length and 80GT or more, MSN 1858 details the manning requirements for deck officers and MSN 1859 details the manning requirements for engineering officers.

If the use of the vessel is not within the scope of the definition of a pleasure vessel manning should be in accordance with the applicable regulations or code of practice.

The MCA provides guidance on additional legislation, which applies where crew are employed or engaged, in MGN 599 .

Class XII vessels (pleasure vessels of 13.7m in length and over) are required to comply with the Merchant Shipping (Fire Protection: Small Craft) Regulations 1998 and the Merchant Shipping (Life-Saving Appliances For Ships Other Than Ships Of Classes III To VI(A)) Regulations 1999.

However practical problems came to light and there is a possibility of conflict with the Recreational Craft Directive (RCD) which has resulted in three Exemptions to the Merchant Shipping Regulations. Owners of Class XII vessels have a choice ; if they opt to comply with one or more of these Exemptions, they do not need to comply with the underlying regulations to which they relate. The exemptions are published by the MCA in MGN 599 .

For pleasure vessels of less than 13.7 metres in length, there are no statutory requirements for safety equipment other than those required under SOLAS V. That said, although safety equipment may not be required by law, it is essential that you properly equip your boat prior to putting to sea.

If the use of the vessel is not within the scope of the definition of a pleasure vessel, the vessel should be equipped in accordance with the applicable regulations or code of practice.

Maritime Radio

The Merchant Shipping (Radio Installations) Regulations 1998 do not apply to Pleasure Vessels. It is therefore not mandatory under these regulations for a Pleasure Vessel to have a "radio installation" on board. It is however highly recommended that vessels are equipped with maritime radio equipment suitable for the area of operation.

  • See Calling for help  for further guidance on equipping your boat. 
  • See Mandatory equipment for Class XII Vessels  for information on other regulations which may mandate the carriage of maritime radio equipment. 

Where a VHF radio or other maritime radio equipment (such as an EPIRB, AIS, ATIS, Radar etc.) is carried, the equipment must be licensed.

A Ship Radio Licence (or Ship Portable Radio Licence) will be required for most boats together with a maritime radio operator certificate authorising the operation of maritime radio equipment if applicable. In the UK Ship Radio Licences and Ship Portable Radio Licences are issued by Ofcom .

For equipment capable of voice transmissions a maritime radio operator licence (such as the Short Range Certificate (SRC)) is usually also required for the operator. See Licensing Onboard Electronics  for further guidance.

If the use of the vessel is not within the scope of the definition of a pleasure vessel the vessel should be equipped in accordance with the applicable regulations or code of practice.

Other UK Regulations Relevant to Pleasure Vessels

MGN 599, in paragraphs 10.12 – 10.18, provides details of legislation concerning Air Pollution Prevention and Use of Antifouling Paints applicable to Pleasure Vessels.  Information regarding registration, survey and certification regulations is given in Chapter 11 of MGN 599 and Chapter 12 covers other Regulations Relevant to Pleasure Vessels. MGN 599 also includes best practice advice.

Byelaws and Local Regulations

Harbour Authorities may have local byelaws in force which apply to leisure boats such as speed limits within the harbour, restricted areas, and requirements to monitor specific VHF channels.  Establishing what these are should be part of your passage planning.

Some Harbour Authorities may have their own website and publish small boat guides e.g. the Port of London Authority website .  In addition, there are usually details of byelaws in Almanacs and pilot books and the more important rules, such as speed limits are posted up on notices within the harbour.

Local Notices to Mariners (LNTM) are often available online and many harbour authorities allow you to subscribe for email updates as and when a new notice is published. A list of sources for LNTM is published under Local Notices to Mariners .

yacht skipper over 24 meter

  • Information
  • Call Us: 0203 006 3717 (9:30am-4:30pm)

What is the Maximum Boat Size for Day Skipper?

First Class Sailing is one of the UK’s leading sailing schools, offering the full range of RYA courses including Day Skipper. We often get asked what the maximum boat size is for Day Skipper by prospective students, but it’s an answer that isn’t as straight forward as you might think.

Firstly, the RYA requirements for the Day Skipper are that the course be taken on a boat that is sized between 7 and 15 metres. So, the maximum boat size you will learn on with Day Skipper will be 23 up to 49 feet.

Once you have passed your RYA Day Skipper qualification , you can then get out on the water with increased confidence. But what is the maximum boat size you can skipper once you have made the grade?

This is where the answer isn’t as simple as you might hope.

In the UK you don’t need a license to skipper a boat under 24 meters (or 80 gross tons). In theory you could actually skipper a 78 foot yacht with a Day Skipper qualification or even no qualification at all.

But it’s very rare this would ever happen, as no company will let someone with just a Day Skipper qualification charter a 24 metre yacht.  Yacht charter companies are unlikely to charter you anything above 50 foot if you have only a Day Skipper qualification.

RYA qualifications are fairly widely recognised.  However, some charter companies prefer you have an ICC (International Certificate of Competence).  To get an ICC you need to send your Day Skipper qualification to the RYA with an admin fee and they will issue you with one.  Alternatively you can take an ICC test.  This is a practical test that usually lasts a few hours.

Like the Day Skipper certificate the ICC covers you for yachts up to 24m in length in coastal waters.

If you are wishing to work on boats using your Day Skipper or ICC qualification, then you will need to take the PPR Course to get your certificate commercially endorsed.

You might also like: Competent Crew .

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yacht skipper over 24 meter

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Maritime School

of the West Indies

yacht skipper over 24 meter

24M Bareboat Skipper

24m bareboat skipper course.

Become a confident and competent skipper of vessels up to 24 meters in length with our five-day International Bareboat Skipper Course. This course is specifically designed for experienced boaters who want to take command of powerboats in fair weather conditions and within sight of land. Whether you're looking to rent a boat in popular cruising destinations like the Mediterranean or the West Indies, or simply enhance your powerboat skills, this course will equip you with the necessary knowledge and certification.

Course Highlights:

Duration: 5 days

Prerequisites: Candidates must be 16 years of age or older and fulfill the following requirements:

Proof of logging 200 nautical miles and 10 days at sea by the end of the course

Completion of IYT's International Crew physical course with an IYT Partner School (possessing an IYT International Crew Certificate or a gold seal affixed to the IYT Boating & Sailing Passport) or equivalent qualification from another training organization

Possession of an IYT VHF Radio Operators Certificate or equivalent from another recognized training organization (ISSA VHF qualifications not accepted)

Comprehensive Modules: The International Bareboat Skipper Course covers Modules 13 to 25 in the IYT International Boating & Sailing Passport, providing you with a well-rounded understanding of skippering responsibilities and essential skills.

Course Syllabus:

During the International Bareboat Skipper Course, you will cover the following topics:

Responsibilities of a bareboat skipper

Crew safety checks

Hull and rig checks

Machinery and systems checks

Fuel and water capacity and range

Menus and quantities

Sources of meteorological information

Weather patterns

Sea and land breezes

Cloud types and formations

Pilotage and passage planning

Considerations when planning a passage

Routine for navigating a coastal passage

Passage strategy

Port regulations, customs, and immigration procedures

Pilotage plans

Vessel handling in confined quarters

Mooring, anchoring, and coming alongside

Ropes, knots, care, and use of lines

General deck work

Tides and currents theory

Tidal heights, springs, and neaps

Rule of "twelfths"

Position fixing and running fixes

Plotting the effect of tides and currents

Collision regulations

Lights, shapes, and sounds

Application of the regulations

Advanced dinghy handling

Certificate and Limitations: 

Upon successful completion of the International Bareboat Skipper Course, you will receive a Certificate of Competency allowing you to command vessels up to 24 meters in length. This certification is recognized by most charter agencies. However, please note the limitations of this certificate:

Command of a vessel up to a maximum length of 78 ft/24 meters

Navigation limited to coastal waters within 20 miles offshore

Suitable for fair conditions with moderate wind and sea conditions

Most charter agencies require daylight hours for chartering.

Power or Sail Endorsements:

 If you undertake this course on a sailboat and later wish to obtain the International Bareboat Skipper Power, you can attend any IYT Partner school approved to offer the International Bareboat Skipper Power course and undergo power training (Module 14 in the Passport Training Programme). Similarly, if you undertake this course on a power vessel and later desire the International Bareboat Skipper Sail qualification, you can attend any IYT Partner school approved to offer the International Bareboat Skipper Sail course and undergo sail training (Module 15 in the Passport Training Programme). The duration of these additional training modules will depend on your experience as a skipper in the respective vessel type.

Expand Your Opportunities: By obtaining the International Bareboat Skipper qualification, you are eligible to automatically obtain the "International Certificate of Competency" (ICC) if you meet the requirements set by the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (Resolution 40). This certification further enhances your sailing credentials and opens doors to various international boating opportunities.

Don't miss out on this opportunity to become a skilled and certified International Bareboat Skipper. Enroll now and take the first step toward a thrilling and rewarding powerboat journey.

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IYT 24M Powerboat course

  • Exploring the Role of a Skipper in Boating and Sailing

The term " skipper " holds a prominent place in the world of boating and sailing, representing the individual tasked with the operation, navigation, and overall management of a vessel. Whether it's a small boat, a luxurious yacht, or a sailing dinghy, the skipper plays a crucial role in ensuring the safety and smooth functioning of the maritime journey.

Boat Skipper and Yacht Skipper:

The title "boat skipper" is a broad term encompassing individuals in charge of various types of boats , while a "yacht skipper" specifically denotes someone overseeing the operations of a yacht. Both positions require a comprehensive understanding of navigation, safety protocols, and the ability to make informed decisions while at sea.

Charter Skipper:

In the realm of chartering, where individuals or groups rent boats for recreational purposes, a charter skipper may be hired. This professional takes the helm for those who may lack the necessary expertise, ensuring a safe and enjoyable experience for all on board.

Sailing Skipper and Skipper 12 Sailing Dinghy:

A "sailing skipper" is someone well-versed in the intricacies of sailing, adept at harnessing the power of the wind to navigate the waters effectively. Meanwhile, a "Skipper 12" refers to a specific type of sailing dinghy , a smaller boat designed for sailing enthusiasts.

Read our top notch articles on topics such as sailing, sailing tips and destinations in our  Magazine.

Caucasian male and two children driving a boat

Sailing a Yacht for the First Time:

For those embarking on their maiden voyage aboard a yacht, having an experienced skipper on board is often recommended. Navigating a yacht for the first time can be a complex endeavor, and the guidance of a seasoned skipper ensures a smoother introduction to this maritime adventure.

Hiring a Skipper:

Individuals who own boats but lack the necessary skills or time to operate them may opt to hire a skipper. This allows them to enjoy the pleasures of boating without the responsibilities and challenges associated with captaining  the vessel

Read more useful sailing tips:

Skippered boats: how to choose a boat, skippered boats: how to pack for a yachting holiday, boat rental with skipper: everyone can go to sea, skippered boats: myths about sailing, sail from lefkada for 14 days. where to, what not to miss when visiting lefkada, skippered boats: step-by-step boat rental, where and why to sail from lefkas marina, don’t panic: handling maritime emergencies, how to become a yacht/boat skipper:.

Aspiring skippers often undergo training and certification processes to acquire the skills and knowledge needed for the role. This may involve learning about navigation, safety procedures, and gaining hands-on experience in boat handling.

Skippers Choice Marine Supply:

In the marine industry, businesses like "Skippers Choice Marine Supply" cater to the needs of skippers and boat enthusiasts, providing a range of products and services to enhance the boating experience.

In conclusion, the term "skipper" encompasses a diverse range of roles in the maritime world, from steering a small boat to captaining a luxurious yacht. Whether hired for a charter, sought for guidance in sailing, or responsible for the day-to-day operation of a vessel, the skipper is a central figure in the world of boating and sailing, ensuring safe  and enjoyable journeys on the water.

So what are you waiting for? Take a look at our  range of charter boats  and head to some of our favourite  sailing  destinations .

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RYA Yachtmaster Offshore / Yachtmaster Coastal / Master of Yachts 200 Course 300

MPT is the most complete full service private maritime school in the country and has been training mariners since 1983. Our Fort Lauderdale based campuses host over 45,000 square feet of classrooms, deck and engineering training labs, the Ship's Store, and student service facilities.

Preparing for RYA Yachtmaster Offshore / Yachtmaster Coastal / Master...

Course description.

  Yachtmaster Certificate of Competency

The Yachtmaster Qualification is the pinnacle of the RYA (Royal Yachting Association) Training and Certification System. It is widely recognized throughout the world as a prestigious accomplishment.

 Holding this credential can:

- Improve your resume for any deck department position on yachts - Serve as prerequisite training for an MCA OOW 3000 GT CoC - Professional Development in your yachting career  - Serve as your Certificate of Competence (CoC) for operators of yachts up to 200 tons

The Yachtmaster Course should be undertaken by crew aspiring to advance to the MCA OOW level up to 3000 tons and by those who are advancing to the command level for Master of Yachts up to 200 tons.

  2 Routes Available – Same Course:

Yachtmaster Coastal Yachtmaster Offshore

Yachting professional candidates are encouraged to start their training and professional development as early in their career as possible. Many will take their STCW Basic Safety Training Program (#140) and then when they qualify, it is recommended to obtain the Yachtmaster Coastal CoC. Candidates wishing to upgrade to the offshore route later can simply examine, without additional required training.

Whether you qualify for the Yachtmaster Coastal or Offshore, the training is the same. The only difference is your experience and practical skill level. You will be examined towards whichever level you qualify for.

The MPT Yachtmaster Coastal and Offshore Course (#300) is taught on a Motor Yacht and the practical training and examination are towards a Motor Certificate of Competence. (If you are applying for a Sail Endorsement, this course will not satisfy your practical training and exam requirements). All sea time must be on a power boat and not on a sail boat under power. The Theory, SRC, PPR, and Basic Training courses are the same for both schemes.

The MPT Yachtmaster advanced level certification is available in a 2 week + exam program combining shore-based theory and practical hands-on techniques for a Motor Vessel and the RYA Practical Examination. The first week of class is in the classroom (theory) and the second week is Practical, out on the boat. In addition, there will be class on Saturday of the first week so please plan accordingly.

YACHTMASTER COASTAL & OFFSHORE Subjects Include:

One week (40 hours) of comprehensive shore-based theory module with written assessment papers including navigation, tidal calculations, international and inland rules of the road, coastal pilotage, meteorology, anchoring and mooring, docking and undocking, buoyage systems, safety, voyage and passage planning, general ship knowledge and seamanship.  A theory examination will be conducted after the completion of the 40-hour theory portion of the program.

One week of Yachtmaster Offshore/Coastal practical training is conducted on board one of MPT’s Yachts. These yachts are up to 48’ and are twin screw motor yachts. This part of the instruction covers seamanship skills such as nautical terms, tides, marlinespike seamanship, anchor work, boat handling, docking, general yachting skills, basic weather, navigation and passage planning. This course will be a preparation course for your final Yachtmaster Coastal/Offshore Examination. The practical portion of the course will be conducted during daytime, evening and occasionally may include weekend hours.

The Yachtmaster Course #300 is an Advanced Review Course and it is assumed that candidates will have the prerequisite knowledge of the Basics of Navigation and recommended to the level of RYA Day Skipper, and the very least, the level of the Essential Navigation On-line course. To increase your likelihood of success, we recommend taking the online pre-course - ESSENTIAL NAVIGATION. Additionally, flash cards are available in the MPT Ship's Store for rules study in lights and shapes. Also, many Apps are available to assist in these subjects for pre-study. It is also strongly advised that you pick up your study material well in advance of the start of your course. Pre-study is essential for a successful outcome of this course. 

The RYA Yachtmaster course is accredited by the RYA and MCA and recognized for service as Captain or Mate (OOW) up to 200gt up to 150 miles from a safe haven, at the Offshore level or up to 60 miles from safe haven at the Coastal level. 

The Yachtmaster CoC meets the STCW A-V1/1 and section A V1/1-4 when combined with Basic Training Courses. Yachtmaster Offshore fulfills the prerequisite for MCA OOW 500 and 3000 GT and the MCA STCW A-II/2 Command Certificate for Master 200GT.

Sea Service Prerequisites (minimums): Note you must be able to provide proof of your sea service before undertaking the exam. This should be provided at least 2 weeks before the course when possible to allow our team to review it and ensure your eligibility for the course. Speak to your MPT Career Counselor or your instructor for assistance.

 Sea Service can be proven by submitting one or more of the following: 

  • Log book (RYA or other acceptable)
  • Sea Service Testimonial Letters from captains, owners or operators of vessels outlining vessel specifics, time underway, your capacity served onboard and the location of the service (tidal or non-tidal waters, etc).
  • Sea Service Forms (calendar style - provided you can supply all of the additional information such as number of miles, etc.) Method 2 is preferred.

Yachtmaster Coastal: Motor - Option 1

Without RYA Coastal Skipper Practical certificate:

  • 2 days as skipper on vessels of less than 24 meters

Note: No more than half of the required miles can be on vessels over 24 meters

Yachmaster Coastal: Motor – Option 2 A & B

  With RYA Coastal Skipper Practical Certificate:

Can be used to enter OOW 3000GT program and modules

A. Mariners with Coastal Skipper Practical Certificate and with more than half of required sea service on vessels less than 24 meters

  • 20 days on board
  • 2 days as skipper on vessel less than 24 meters

B. Mariners with Coastal Skipper Practical Certificate and with more than half of required sea service on vessels greater than 24 meters

  • 30 days on board

Yachtmaster Offshore: Motor  

  • 50 days sea time overall on motor vessels
  • 5 days in the command position on the vessel (as Master)
  • 2500 nautical miles logged with half transiting through tidal waters and half on a vessel of less than 24 meters that is not a tender.
  • 5 passages over 60 nautical miles, including 2 overnight and 2 in command (as Master) of vessel.        

Yachtmaster Ocean:

  • Obtain Yeachmaster Offshore
  • Complete the RYA astro/ocean shorebased theory #306
  • Ocean passage of 600 nautical miles or more as captain or mate
  • Complete oral exam with RYA examiner successfully

For Commercial Endorsement:

In addition to the SRC and First Aid (must have been taken within 5 years) you will need to obtain an MCA Certificate of Medical Fitness (ENG-1) as well as the Personal Survival Training (4 Modules of STCW 210) and the online Professional Practices & Responsibilities (PPR) Certificate. If you are planning to work commercially, you should simply add the STCW Basic Training Program, which will include the approved Personal Survival and First Aid automatically and will also allow your Yachtmaster CoC to have the STCW endorsement as well. Most boats internationally require this of all crew working commercially. We also recommend the Security Awareness or Designated Security (VPDSD) Course if you are working commercially as well. These are all separate fees from the Yachtmaster Course however MPT offers Package discounts, speak to an MPT RYA Specialist for more information and assistance. There is also a fee candidates will pay to the RYA for the commercial endorsement.

Written & Practical Exam Information:

The written exams are administered at MPT at the end of the shore-based theory segment of your program. They include all of the topics covered in the course. All of the shore-based courses and experience criteria must be fulfilled before the RYA Examiner will conduct the practical assessment. The final exam will be conducted by an independent and unbiased RYA Yachtmaster examiner and takes the form of an extensive oral and practical examination on a motor yacht. Candidates who have taken MPT's Yachtmaster course may use one of the MPT vessels for the exam at no additional fee. The practical exam will take an additional one-two day and is scheduled when the examiner is available and generally immediately after the course, weather permitting.  Once your eligibility has been reviewed (sea time and prerequisites met), the schedule for the practical examination is predicated on several things:

1)The weather as this is a practical underway examination 2)The availability of the RYA Examiner (this is not an MPT employee)

Examinations may need to be scheduled for additional days which may not be consecutive to the dates of the course.

Exam Subjects:

We will review with you the knowledge-based subjects during your shore-based theory week and also fine tune your boat handling skills during your practical course, but you should be familiar with the following areas when you join the class and proficient by the exam date. (Note if you are not already well versed in these subjects when you arrive, you are strongly encouraged to take the Essential Navigation (online course) as there is not sufficient time to cover the basics in the 2-week program. Ask about #333) 

  • Knowledge of the International and Inland Rules of the Road.
  • Safety. The candidate will be expected to know what safety equipment should be carried on board a yacht.
  • Boat Handling, Maneuvering, Docking: Yachtmaster Coastal students will be expected to answer questions & demonstrate ability in simple situations only. Yachtmaster Offshore candidates are expected to demonstrate ability in more complex situations and will also be expected to show a higher level of expertise.
  • General seamanship, including maintenance.
  • Responsibilities of the skipper
  • Navigation, Basic Weather 
  • Radio Communication & Signaling
  • Command presence, management and direction of crew.
  • Essential Navigation (online course)

Practical Exam Fees:

The RYA Examination Fee for the initial examination will be paid by MPT as part of your course tuition. Additional RYA fees are paid by candidate if a subsequent examination is needed.

 If at the end of your course you wish to postpone the practical exam date, you are permitted to return for exam and RYA exam fee paid by MPT, within one calendar year, space permitting.

Additional Recommended or Required Courses:

  • Essentials of Navigation (Online Pre-Course) #333
  • First Aid & CPR #143 or Take STCW Basic Safety Training #141, 142, 143, 144
  • SRC VHF Radio License #303 Required (offered Online) or GMDSS GOC #404
  • RYA PPR (Professional Practices & Responsibility) #335 ONLINE COURSE
  • MCA Approved Engine Course #440
  • USCG Radar Course #148 & ARPA Course #150 or MCA Nav/Radar/ARPA Course #402

If you have three years of yacht service, speak to a career counselor about continuing straight through your OOW or Chief Mate 3000 GT program.

Required Materials

RECOMMEND PRE-STUDY: Essential Navigation online, course #333, COLREGS Study Apps or flashcard, and course notes. AVAILABLE IN MPT SHIPS STORE or bring with you the following: Pencil (mechanical or #2) Paper Chart Eraser (We recommend white- like magic rub or Staedtler), Navigation Tools (parallel rules/Portland plotter/triangles – your choice), Dividers (we recommend two- one as divider and one as compass), Calculator (we recommend the TI-30x), Hand Bearing Compass - optional though recommended (We recommend Weems & Plath #2004). Pick up at MPT when you register or when you check-in: Yachtmaster Shore based Training Manuals & Charts (provided by MPT).

11 day class in Fort Lauderdale

RECOMMENDED PRE-STUDY: Available at MPT Ships Store Complete Course Training DVD Flashcards AVAILABLE IN MPT SHIPS STORE OR BRING WITH YOU: Pencil (mechanical or #2) Paper Chart Eraser (We recommend white - like magic rub or staedtler) Navigation Tools (parallel rules/Portland plotter/triangles - your choice) Dividers (we recommend two - one as divider and one as compass) Calculator (we recommend the TI-30x) Hand Bearing Compass (We recommend Weems & Plath #2004) PICK UP AT SCHOOL WHEN YOU REGISTER OR WHEN YOU CHECK-IN: Yachtmaster Shorebased Training Manuals & Charts (provided by MPT)

Course Photos

yacht skipper over 24 meter

Testimonials

Not suggestions. Thanks for letting me be your student! Alejandro, Friday August 2015 RYA Yachtmaster Offshore / Yachtmaster Coastal / Master of Yachts 200
A bit more time would be nice! But Steve was an awesome instructor.Very easy to follow and very thorough. Arthur, Wednesday November 2013 RYA Yachtmaster Offshore / Yachtmaster Coastal / Master of Yachts 200

1915 South Andrews Avenue, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33316, +1-954-525-1014 | +1-888-839-5025 (Toll Free)

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Yacht Skipper (PY)

Yacht skipper course (py).

This title allows you to navigate boats up to 24 meters length and up to a maximum distance from the coast of 150 miles. To obtain this degree, you must first be in possession of the title of Skipper of Recreational Boats and pass the appropriate exam of this degree. There are two modules that need to be approved: navigation module (navigation theory and nautical chart) and the generic module (safety at sea and meteorology). This qualification would allow you, for example, to sail the entire Mediterranean.

Requirements

  • Be in possession of the TITLE PER
  • Pass the appropriate theoretical exam
  • Perform 48 hours of basic safety and navigation practices
  • Pass a psychotechnical examination

PNB Patron de Navegacion Basica

Up to 24 meters length

yacht skipper over 24 meter

Up to 150 miles from the coast

yacht skipper over 24 meter

Day and night navigation

yacht skipper over 24 meter

Provision of certain professional services

yacht skipper over 24 meter

Allows tourist excursions and recreational fishing

  • Navigation practices for yacht skippers. Mandatory 48 hours. Current regulations stipulate that to obtain the title of yacht skipper, you must present a certificate from an approved school where you have performed the established navigation practices.
  • Sailing Habilitation Practice Optional 16 hours. The habilitation practice consists of 4 descents of 4 hours each. This allows you to steer sailboats. It serves for the titles PNB, PER, Yacht Skipper and Yacht Captain, if you complete it for one title, it will be worth it for the others.

Are you interested in our courses and practical training?

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Fill out the following form with your contact details and message. Our team will contact you shortly to help you.

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Skipper on a Yacht – The Ultimate Guide

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When it comes to sailing trips and holidays, a lot of people appear misinformed that it requires extensive knowledge of oceanic navigation as well as operating a boat.

The comforting truth, on the contrary, is that a sailing trip can be enjoyed by complete novices as much as any sailing pro.

Almost all yacht charter companies these days provide a skippered boat with a crew in addition to regular bareboat charters.

In other words, you can enjoy the freedom of being all by yourself in the serene blue ocean without any stress and responsibility.

In fact, in my early experiences on charter boats, I almost always had professional and experienced skippers in charge of navigation and operation. Even now, I often go on sailing holidays with a skipper on a yacht.

In this article, you can learn all about the benefits of hiring a skippered boat, tips to hire a professional and experienced captain, what you can legitimately expect from the skipper during your sailing trip as well as other relevant information.

Table of Contents

Responsibilities of the Skipper

The primary reason for chartering a skippered boat is to hand over the navigation and operation of the yacht to someone who has the necessary experience and knowledge.

In the case of your skipper, you can expect him to ensure the safe passage of the boat through responsible boat handling and safe seamanship.

In the case of a fully crewed yacht, the responsibilities of the skipper include making sure the crew understand and carry out their roles and duties.

The skipper is expected to maintain proper coordination among the crew.

To sum up, the tasks and responsibilities of a skipper are both technical and interpersonal. Apart from operating the boat and navigating it expertly, he should also ensure that the crew is obeying his command dutifully.

People on a boat

Who Should Choose the Option of a Skippered Yacht?

People with no or little sailing experience would have to choose the services of a professional and experienced skipper to make their trip a success.

Skippered yachts are perfect for those who do not possess a sailor’s license but want to partake in the fun of a sailing holiday.

Also, if you are part of a large group of friends and family, and want to leave the responsibility of sailing to the skipper to enjoy the trip in a stress-free manner, then you should certainly consider a skippered boat.

A skippered boat is also ideal for people who want to sharpen their sailing skill under the watchful eye of an experienced and professional sailor.

Even experienced sailors can benefit from professionally skippered boats if you want to partake in regattas and require that extra bit of help and professional knowledge.

Planning Your Itinerary With the Skipper

One of the best advantages of having a skippered boat comes from the help you would get in planning your sailing itinerary.

The skippers on particular routes have extensive knowledge of the best locations, coves, inlets, and beaches that you and your friends would enjoy during the trip.

They can help you plan the sailing trip in a way that makes it possible for you to see and experience the most during your trip.

Also, skippers are intimately aware of the prevailing weather conditions and may help you tweak your itinerary in such a way that adverse weather does not mar your holiday.

Last, but not the least, skippers know the best and cheapest places to moor the boat so that you do not spend extra at expensive marinas.

Boats on the water

Does the Yacht Charter Price Include in Skipper’s Fees?

Yacht charter companies do not include the fees payable to a skipper when you lease their boats.

The fees commanded by the skipper is typically done at the base office, while the invoice for the same is generated and handed over to you after the completion of the trip.

The yacht charter companies only advertise the cost of hiring their boat, without the crew, complements, and skipper, on their brochures and websites.

  Accommodation for Skipper Aboard the Boat

It is required that you reserve one of the cabins for skipper and his crew to rest and sleep in during your sailing trip.

Typically, a lot of boats have a special version for charter companies featuring extra cabins so that more people can be accommodated on the boat.

It is not required that you reserve the stateroom or other luxurious cabins for the crew. Typically, yachts come with a dedicated cabin for crew and feature bunk beds.

Who is Responsible for Skipper’s Meals?

It is customary that skippers be provided meals along with the crew by the chartering party. There is no requirement that the food should be fancy or gourmet quality, and the crew and skipper would typically eat whatever you serve.

During your trip ashore in the middle of your sailing holiday, it is considered nice to take the skipper to restaurants along with you.

However, there is no such requirement or custom, and you may just hand him enough cash for a meal at the local fast food joint.

Do’s and Don’ts for Skipper on Board the Yacht

As mentioned above, the primary role of the skipper on board the boat is to ensure a safe and enjoyable trip for everyone.

This means taking care of the technical aspects of sailing, including the correct deployment of mast and sails, safe moorings, checking the weather conditions, guiding the crew, and advise on the route.

The skipper, however, is not obligated to take the route preferred by you if they deem it dangerous due to any reason, including weather.

Similarly, you should not expect the skipper to perform menial tasks such as cleaning.

Skipper on a boat

Cost of Hiring a Skipper

The cost of hiring a skipper dependent on some factors including his professional experience, the region you are sailing in, and the sailing season.

On an average, you should expect to pay between Euro 90 to 150 for each day of your sailing trip.

How to Tip the Skipper?

It is customary to tip the skipper at the end of the sailing trip. Typically, the tip works out to 10 percent of his total sailing fee.

However, if you liked his services and recommendations, then you may tip generously. The skipper will certainly appreciate it.

Advantages of Hiring a Skipper

Probably the best part of having a skippered boat is that it allows you to get the most out of your sailing holiday.

  • In my personal experience, I have noticed that the presence of a professional and experienced skipper enabled us to plan our itinerary better.
  • Many times, the skipper’s intimate knowledge of the local coastline and weather helped us see places that we did not expect and avoid rough weather.
  • Skippers know the best places to eat during your trips ashore and have their own local sources to recommend the best places to see and visit.
  • Also, you can truly enjoy a stress-free and blissful holiday with your friends and family safe in the knowledge that your boat is in capable hands.

In Conclusion

Skippered boats are probably a perfect way to introduce the joy of sailing holidays to those who have not experienced it before.

Even among those with sufficient sailing experience, there are a lot of benefits to having an experienced skipper in charge of the yacht.

There is no doubt that an experienced sailor would help you get more out of your holiday in every sense of the term. While it may be slightly costlier than bareboat charters, a skippered boat is certainly worth its price.

Need a skipper on your boat? Send your inquiry now, and you’ll receive a free skippered yacht charter quote!

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Have you already hired a skipper? If so, what was your experience? Please feel free to share it by leaving a comment just below, I’ll be glad to hear your feedback:)

Picture of Daniella

Daniella has been passionate about travel, the sea, and nature for many years. As a child, she frequently traveled throughout the Mediterranean and continued with her journeys throughout her adult life.

Her experiences have created the desire within her to share her love for traveling with other passionate and adventurers who want to discover beautiful horizons and new cultures.

7 thoughts on “Skipper on a Yacht – The Ultimate Guide”

Hi Daniella,

I just found out that I can charter a yacht with a skipper commandeering it. I was reluctant to go to the sea because I thought I have to go to a “sea” school first.

Especially, when you watch all the Hollywood movies that portray you can go on a cruise without a skipper. And then comes the storm. YUCK!

Now I can safely plan my trip with the skipper’s help. Thank you for bringing this to my attention and corrected my misinformation.

No problem. it’s a pleasure for me to inform the readers, this is the purpose of the website:)

I am happy that the misinformation has been cleared up! And, indeed, you can plan in complete tranquility your next trip with the help of a skipper, believe me, it is worth it:)

Thank you for the comment and wish you a nice day!

Thanks for the information on skippers on a yacht. I have never been on a yacht before and know very little about them except what they look like and are used for! So i enjoyed learning about the skipper as never actually heard that term before. It’s something that i would love to do one day, And the pictures make it seem like it is an amazing experience to have. Maybe one day!

Having a skipper on board is something fabulous:) You don’t need to worry about the navigation at all. They also know the environment well so you can count on him to bring you to best places as well:) Isn’t great?

Thank you for the comment and wish you a wonderful day!

Thank you for visiting my website and for the comment:) To answer your question, most charter companies offer to the client the option to hire a skipper for their sailing holiday. Skippers are not included in the price as they work independently and the cost per day will vary between 120 to 150 Euro, some, even more, depending on the skipper skill. If you own a yacht and you wish to hire a skipper, you can find one at “ Delivery Captain ” I hope it helped and if you need more information, feel free to contact me at any time, I’ll be more than happy to assist!

Have a wonderful day!

I really like your comment about how an experienced sailor would help you get more out of a holiday than sailing on your own. I imagine it would also be a good idea to work with a skipper if you plan to buy your own yacht as well, even if you plan on learning to sail (someone has to teach you, after all). I imagine that a skipper would have a lot of good information about different services as well, like yacht delivery if you plan to move for example.

I am glad you like the comment, thank you for the kind feedback:) Oh, yes, definitely, a skipper will not just navigate the boat, but he will also teach you a lot of things and will bring you to places you don’t know. A skipper is someone you can rely on!

Thank you again for the comment and wish you a wonderful day!

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yacht skipper over 24 meter

A comprehensive guide to hiring the perfect yacht skipper

Essential skills, platforms to look at, and expert hiring advice. Dive into our comprehensive guide with a vetting checklist for your yacht's skipper.

Yachting evokes images of boundless freedom, where azure waters meet endless horizons, and luxury joins the primal allure of the sea. But beneath this dance of opulence and open waters, there's an art and science that ensures every voyage is seamless. The maestro? The yacht skipper. Sometimes, the boat owner assumes this pivotal role, while others may opt for hiring a professional crew.

In this article, we'll journey through the multifaceted role of a skipper, exploring the breadth of their responsibilities from navigation to guest relations. We'll guide you through the avenues available to find the right candidate, the crucial skills to look for, the intricacies of the hiring process, and a comprehensive checklist to assist you every step of the way.

Yacht crew recruitment: what is the skipper’s role?

On a motor yacht , crew configurations often reflect the owner's specific needs and desires. Some opt for a comprehensive setup, bringing roles such as the Chief Steward or Stewardess for tailored guest experiences, a dedicated Chef for gourmet dining, and, on larger yachts, a Purser for administrative oversight aboard. Conversely, others might prefer a streamlined team, focusing on only the essentials like a Chief Engineer for technical needs and a Deckhand for general upkeep. Yet, regardless of how expansive or minimalistic the crew setup is, central to all these configurations is the Skipper.

yacht skipper over 24 meter

Countries like Malta, Bermuda, and the Bahamas allow skippers to officiate weddings on board, turning maritime journeys into romantic celebrations.

Where to find a yacht skipper?

The good news is you're never short of options. Whether guided by trusted endorsements, budget constraints, or a thirst for discovery, the horizon is dotted with promising leads. Here's where you might strike gold on your quest:

Source

Description

Pros

Cons

Yacht Crew Agencies

Professional crew recruitment agencies are well-versed in the maritime industry and have a roster of qualified skippers.

Vetted candidates. Industry expertise.

Agency fees. Limited pool.

Online Platforms

Dedicated websites and apps for yacht owners to post vacancies or browse skipper profiles. Often have reviews and ratings.

User reviews. Wide reach.

Varying reliability. Information overload.

Maritime Schools & Training Institutes

Liaise with schools for graduates who are well-trained in modern navigational methods.

Fresh talent. Modern training.

Less experience. Narrow specializations.

Word of Mouth

Personal recommendations from other boat owners, crew members, or maritime professionals.

Direct referrals. Trusted sources.

Biased views. Limited range.

Yacht Clubs and Marinas

Hubs of networking within the yachting community. Members might know skippers familiar with local waters and regulations.

Local expertise. Networking opportunities.

Limited to region. May lack specialization

Key skills to look for in a powerboat skipper

When evaluating potential skippers, it's easy to hone in on obvious attributes: vast sea hours, proficiency in navigation, and a commanding presence. While these traits are undoubtedly crucial, delving deeper might reveal other essential yet overlooked competencies. How often do we consider a skipper's adaptability in unforeseen scenarios? Or their capacity to foster crew cohesion? What about their finesse in guest relations?

To simplify this, we've categorized the critical skills into six distinct areas, providing a more transparent lens through which to assess potential candidates.

a couple on the deck of a sailing yacht with a view of the sea

Skippering a boat for the first time: steps to success

  • Katy Stickland
  • September 18, 2020

Skippering a boat for the first time needn't be daunting, as long as you prepare. Matthew Diggle reveals how to make a success of taking charge

Skippering for the first time doesn't mean you are on the helm

New skippers don't need to be at the helm, and giving crew tasks will keep them happy and motivated. Credit: Matthew Diggle

It’s a pity that skippering a boat for the first time can seem so intimidating.

Not much beats the feeling of being in charge of a yacht, deciding where to go, and taking the crew on an adventure.

And there’s a real sense of accomplishment at the end when you bring the crew and boat home safely.

For anyone who is new to sailing or who crews for someone else, following the RYA training path and becoming a Day Skipper is an excellent way of taking your sailing to the next level.

A moored yacht

As you gain confidence you can start to charter and explore new cruising grounds. Credit: Matthew Diggle

It shows that you understand the fundamentals and can take on more responsibility when other people feel daunted by the thought of being responsible for a boat and its crew.

With a bit of preparation and planning, skippering is well within most people’s capabilities, especially if you don’t bite off more than you can chew for the first few trips.

Preparation is the key. Simply put, you have to decide where to go, who to go with, and how to get there.

I thought it would be useful to share the lessons I’ve learned when I first started skippering for those considering taking their first steps.

Skippering a crew

Sailing boats are not particularly spacious down below so I generally don’t try to fill every berth onboard.

Even so, it is vital that the crew can get along together and this means that you have to choose who to invite carefully.

This is often a bit of a juggling act, trying to coordinate different people and boat availability, so in the end you’re unlikely to be able to please everyone.

Just offer some reasonable options and hope for the best.

A crew standing on a pontoon by a white yacht

Careful crew selection will contribute to a happy trip for all. Credit: Matthew Diggle

It is also important that people know what to expect, so they don’t sign up thinking that they’ll have a spacious cabin with en-suite facilities when they’ll actually get a space in the shared forepeak in a boat with a single heads.

Similarly, being clear about the nature of the trip – that this is your first time skippering –  will avoid adrenaline-junkies being frustrated by a gentle coastal cruise, or nervous novices being scared rigid during an offshore passage.

When skippering the first few times, it is well worth inviting an experienced and knowledgeable sailor to act as first mate.

But you should choose them wisely as you don’t want anyone who will take over or boss you about if you’re a bit slow working something out, or don’t do things in exactly the way they would.

What you really need is a calm and supportive person who will give you the space to experiment, have a quiet word in your ear if they are concerned that something is wrong, but who is capable of taking over if you are incapacitated in any way.

After all, you have to trust them to come back to pick you up if you have the misfortune to fall in, and you must be confident that they could get the boat and crew to somewhere safe if needed.

A man helming, while the skipper looks out to sea

A competent first mate will make your life as skipper much less stressful. Credit: Matthew Diggle

In return for the safety and security they provide, you should listen carefully to what they say and pay attention to their skippering advice.

You should also make it clear to the rest of the crew who the first mate is and that they may have to assume command.

It is also sensible to ensure that not all the crew are novices.

Coaching new crew is time-consuming, and sometimes time is in short supply.

It also takes up mental space while your head needs to be concentrating on skippering the boat.

This is especially true when coming into a berth.

Having one or two people capable of handling the fenders and warps will avoid the sort of situation I got into on one of my trips where I didn’t notice the crew were busy trying to remember how to tie the fenders so that when I got the mooring slightly wrong, they didn’t see we were drifting towards another boat and I ended up shouting.

In the end, someone from the other boat pushed us clear, but it definitely wasn’t my finest hour as skipper.

A crew of a yacht standing on the deck

With the crew briefed and kitted up, you’re ready to sail. Credit: Matthew Diggle

I usually send round practical information about arrangements, including advice about what to pack (and what to pack it in), about sharing cabins, what we will do about food, and also some reassuring words about the safety equipment on board.

More experienced crew members will probably already be aware of some or all of these things, but it is a good idea for everyone to have the same information so that there is a common starting point.

But I usually throw an extra sleeping bag in the car and make sure I check everyone’s equipped before setting off, just in case.

Organising a planning meeting, arranging to share lifts to the boat, or making some other excuse to get people together beforehand is a good idea.

The better people know each other, the more smoothly the trip is likely to run.

Encourage people to use email or social media to communicate, but make sure you ask for permission before sharing email addresses or phone numbers.

Keep your first skippering trip in familiar waters

Although it might be tempting to go exploring, you will probably have enough to think about without having to navigate around somewhere entirely new.

Indeed, the Day Skipper qualification says that you are only competent in ‘familiar areas’, but even here you might find yourself sailing from a marina or harbour you’ve not visited before.

If this is the case then do some research to get an idea of what to expect.

A skipper wearing a red lifejacket looking towards land from the cockpit of a yacht

Sailing in familiar waters will let you focus on skippering rather than navigating new hazards. Credit: Matthew Diggle

When you pick the boat up, take the opportunity to chat with the charterer and people on other boats nearby to get some local knowledge.

They’re likely to regale you with anecdotes about other visitors who have come to grief in one way or another.

Don’t let these tales put you off, just listen carefully and then you won’t feature in their next story.

Unless you have a particularly trusting boat-owning friend you will probably also need to use your Day Skipper qualification to charter a yacht.

Again, you are better settling for something which is not too adventurous or enormous.

This is not the time to have to deal with something much bigger than you’re used to or with extra sails, rigging, or masts that you’re not accustomed to.

The cost of the trip

One of the first practical aspects of arranging a trip is to sort out the finance.

You will need to cover the cost of the boat, together with mooring and fuel, and then decide whether to include food, meals out, and drinks.

I find that the simplest option is to share all the costs equally, and the first step is to prepare a rough budget so people have an idea of how much the trip is going to cost.

It’s generally better to over-estimate and then give people a small refund, rather than to try to collect an extra few quid from everyone at the end of the trip if, for example, there was a lack of wind and so the fuel costs more than you expected.

You also need to consider what to do about the cost of any damage.

Continues below…

A happy Pete Goss and his wife Tracey aboard a Garcia Exploration 45

Masterclass: How to lead a happy crew

Toby Heppell gets advice on skippering with friends and family from Pete Goss, Dee Caffari and Conrad Humphreys

Crew sailing a Dufour 365

Competent Crew: On course for cruising harmony

Katy Stickland joined an RYA Competent Crew course to find out why instruction can make life as a sailing couple…

Sailing at night

Night sailing tips for first timers

Cruising after dark doesn't need to be stressful. Toby Heppell shares his tops tips for night sailing

Yachts rafted up against a tidal wall

How to raft up safely and securely

James Stevens looks at the seamanship and etiquette needed to raft up and identifies the benefits and pitfalls of coming…

Do you trust everyone to stump up or would it be easier to include insurance in the basic cost of the trip?

You may find that potential crew are rather more enthusiastic about coming on a sailing trip in theory than they are in practice.

Asking them to pay a deposit when booking and the rest closer to departure is a good way of gaining commitment and preventing them from cancelling at the last minute.

Finally, record all expenses and payments so that everyone can check the figures and see that things have been divided up fairly.

This should help prevent disagreements.

There are a number of apps to make both the sums and payment straightforward.

Safety procedures

You are responsible for everyone’s safety and you should take this seriously, but in fact this usually isn’t too onerous if you are sensible and careful.

If you charter a coded vessel in the UK then it will come with a full set of safety equipment appropriate for its cruising limits.

All you will need to do is find where everything is stowed and familiarise yourself with specific details of the lifejackets, jackstays, and so on when you pick the boat up.

Then make sure the crew know how to use it, and do so at the appropriate time.

A fire extinguisher onboard a yacht

Brief the crew about safety equipment on board. Credit: Graham Snook/Yachting Monthly

I ask for an emergency contact number for each crew member, and in return let them have details of a shore contact.

I also ask crew members, in confidence, about any medical conditions that might affect them on the trip.

If someone falls ill you don’t want to be scrabbling about trying to find out if they have an inhaler or medication that could help.

Similarly, if you have to hand them over to an ambulance, the medics are likely to ask if they are allergic to common medicines.

There’s no need to share this with anyone beforehand, but I like to leave a copy with the shore contact and let the first mate know where the info is on the boat, just in case it were to be needed.

Catering for your crew

The first step when planning what to eat onboard is to check everyone’s allergies, likes, and dislikes.

With a modicum of thought it is quite feasible to cater for vegetarian, gluten-free, and other diets without making things too complicated.

There’s certainly no excuse for only offering a vegetarian crew member cheese sandwiches for every meal.

A crew eating dinner on a yacht

Good food on board boosts morale and can be a highlight of the trip. Credit: Matthew Diggle

On short, coastal trips I usually just cater for breakfast and lunch, and aim to eat ashore most evenings.

However, I like to have a simple ‘emergency meal’ on board, such as pasta and a jar of sauce, to make sure we can have a hot meal even if we end up at anchor rather than in a marina as planned.

I find that snacks, fruit, and biscuits are always welcome, and distributing a few chocolate bars can really lift the spirits during a hard slog or a long beat to windward.

Navigating your first trip

Once you’ve selected your crew, booked a boat, and decided on a cruising-ground, it’s time to start on the detailed preparations.

It is worth putting some effort into making the actual trip as straightforward and stress-free as possible.

Skippering means you’ll have lots to think about, so take any opportunity to ‘cheat’ by preparing things beforehand.

Your RYA training will have taught you how to work out tidal depths from the tables in an almanac, but why not print out some tidal curves for the time you’re away, in particular for any marinas you’re thinking of visiting?

Planning and navigation software packages can do this well in advance, and you can find information for the next few days online.

After all, you can still do things the traditional way if you want to impress your crew (or just to prove to yourself that you remember how) but if things are going wrong or time is short then having ‘one you prepared earlier’ can be a literal life-saver.

Weather forecasts

Similarly, you can download weather maps and forecasts for the next few days before setting off.

Obviously, things will change so you will have to re-check the forecast every day, but having a feel for the general weather pattern should help you decide whether to turn left or right when you leave the marina on the first day.

Unless you’re feeling particularly masochistic or determined to experience ‘life at an angle’, it’s not very clever to spend the first half of a trip on a hard beat only to find the weather system passes and you spend the second half on a hard beat back again, when setting off in the other direction initially would have resulted in a pleasant cruise, both ways.

A yacht sailing through waves

Plan a couple of route options in case the weather changes. Credit: Matthew Diggle

Finally, get hold of any information you can about places you might visit or that you might want to have in reserve as bolt-holes.

Printing out some sketch-maps and pilotage notes can help you stay up on deck rather than spending time below checking the charts.

Share your plan with the crew, but make sure everyone knows that you might have to revise it due to things like a change in the weather.

Picking up the boat

Try to pick up the boat before the crew arrives.

Taking the inventory and doing the handover is much easier if the boat is not full of people and all their kit.

Then put the kettle on ready to give the crew a warm welcome.

If you’re parking a car at the marina then it is sensible to leave as much stuff in it as possible, particularly bulky bags and rucksacks.

A set of dry going-home clothes (and shoes) together with a dry towel and a bag for damp kit is a good idea if you think you might arrive back cold and wet on the last day – and if you’re sailing in the UK that is pretty likely!

Briefing your crew

Brief the crew before setting off.

Keep this simple and to the point; you don’t want to worry people, but it is important to point out the key things.

I usually include:

  • Lifejackets and tethers
  • Fire prevention and extinguishers
  • Galley and gas safety
  • First-aid kit
  • How to turn off autopilot
  • Using winches safely
  • Starting the engine
  • VHF radio and sending a DSC mayday
  • Using the heads

Give a briefing that is appropriate for the crew, so you might have to have a couple of different briefings or even give one to the experienced people and get them to brief it on.

It’s a good idea to show people how to use pontoon cleats before setting off, rather than trying to explain this at the end of the day.

Other things about sailing the boat can be introduced gradually over the course of the day.

Consider having simple standing orders to make it clear what’s expected of the crew.

These should include rules about wearing lifejackets and tethers, such as ‘whenever you want to and whenever I tell you to’.

Remember to let your shore contact know when you set off, and also when (and where) you arrive.

Using the RYA SafeTRX app is a great way of ensuring that they are alerted if you’re overdue and it can also produce records of the trip that the crew may find interesting, but do keep your mobile charged during the trip or you might not be able to close the trip when you arrive, leading to possible confusion or concern.

When skippering, try to keep everyone involved in running the boat.

In challenging conditions it may be prudent to limit some tasks to more confident and experienced crew, but don’t let them dominate and hog the helm or other exciting jobs the rest of the time; make sure that everyone gets a turn.

Remember to be positive about everyone’s efforts, patient if you have to explain things, and gentle if you have to correct someone.

After all, they’re here to enjoy themselves and a harsh word may put someone off ever sailing with you again.

A crew member in wet weather gear

If you can, go with the wind when it blows up. Your crew will thank you. Credit: Matthew Diggle

Keep an eye on the crew so you’re aware if anyone is starting to suffer from seasickness or is getting cold, and deal with it before it gets too bad.

I find that putting seasick crew on the helm or persuading them to lie on a bunk with their eyes closed usually helps.

Hot drinks and an offer to pass up warmer clothes will help a cold crew member who is, perhaps, avoiding going below decks.

You are in charge of the boat and part of skippering is to ensure the crew have confidence in you.

So, remain calm at all times, or at least appear calm while you work out what to do next.

Don’t dither, it’s your responsibility when skippering to make decisions and when faced with a choice almost the worst thing you can do is nothing.

On the other hand, don’t be afraid of changing your plans if conditions change.

Don’t sail on regardless, hoping that things will turn out alright; shorten the trip if the crew are struggling, change the destination if the wind shifts.

Final words on first time skippering

Matthew Diggle, skippering for the first time

Matthew Diggle started sailing after signing up for the 2011-12 Clipper Race. Since then he’s cruised in UK waters and off the Italian and Croatian coast. Credit: Matthew Diggle

It’s always worth having a debrief at the end of the day and of the trip to reflect on what people enjoyed, learned or didn’t understand, and hopefully this will help ensure everyone leaves happy.

As a skipper you are allowed to have fun too, but it is different to going on a trip that someone else has organised.

It may seem hard work and a little daunting to start with, but you’ll get into your stride after only a few trips.

I find it immensely satisfying when crew tell me that they’ve enjoyed a trip, that they’ve learned new skills, and, most of all, that they want to come back.

So why not start planning a trip and gathering a crew now?

First time skippering checklist

  • Select crew with similar expectations
  • Mix of abilities and experienced first mate
  • Set expectations of boat and plans early
  • Email joining instructions ahead of time
  • Take a spare sleeping bag and waterproofs
  • Meet up before the trip if possible
  • Share shore contact details for the boat and get emergency contact for each crew

Cruising grounds

  • Stick to familiar areas for first-time skippering
  • Research new places you want to visit
  • Get some local knowledge from charter company or marina
  • Charter in an area you know
  • Opt for a modest-sized boat that will be easy to sail
  • Stick to white sails and don’t worry about spinnakers
  • Arrive before the crew to settle in
  • Decide what costs you will cover, and what you will split
  • Be clear with your crew about how much it will cost
  • Include a margin for extra fuel, and refund if possible
  • Ask for a deposit so crew commit
  • Check the boat has all the necessary safety equipment and where it is
  • Brief your crew on safety gear and procedures, above and below decks
  • Check if crew are on medication or have medical requirements
  • Check and fit lifejackets
  • Establish standing orders of when to wear lifejackets, who is in charge, and who first mate is
  • Check for crew allergies, likes and dislikes
  • Decide if you’re cooking on board or eating ashore
  • Have enough for breakfasts, lunches and a back-up meal
  • Take plenty of snacks, tea, coffee and milk
  • Print out tide times, tidal curves and weather forecasts beforehand
  • Plan a couple of route options to cover different weather scenarios
  • Aim to make the first sail an easy one
  • Prepare pilotage for new places you plan to visit
  • Let shore contact know plans/use RYA SafeTRX app
  • Share and rotate roles among crew
  • Look out for bored, cold or seasick crew
  • Distribute snacks and drinks regularly
  • Keep an eye on the big picture – passage plan, weather, navigation and safety
  • Teach crew if you have time, but don’t be distracted
  • Discuss plans, but you make the final decisions
  • Debrief at the end of the day and of the trip

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24m Classic Trawler

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24m Trawler 4

24m trawler 3, 24m trawler 2, 24m trawler 1, 24m trawler 14, 24m trawler 13, 24m trawler 12, 24m trawler 6, 24m trawler 11, 24m trawler 10, 24m trawler 7, 24m trawler 8, 24m trawler 9, send us mail.

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Lovely 24m Classic Trawler with modern features

24 m MY Base Information

This 24m Yacht is a wonderful piece of traditional looking yacht in combination with the latest technologies and built with the experience of over 350 projects from our shipyard.

The yacht has a lot of features coming from the super yachts done by NEDSHIP, which gives a much more volume and functionality to the yacht than on comparable yachts this size on the market.

Beside the full beam master cabin on the guest deck, there are 3 more guest cabins each with its own bathroom, so that the yacht can accommodate up to 8 guests.

The traditional design offers more space as it looks. The beam of 6.5m is much more than on comparable yachts and also the sun deck shows much more space for sun bathing, dining and relaxing.

The crew is located on the bow section and accommodates 2 crew members.

Two Caterpillar C 18 are bringing an economical cruising speed of 15kn and a top speed of 19 kn.

The yacht is built in high class epoxy composite with Carbon reinforcements. This material has some of the following advantages compare to GRP or steel:

  • Better noise protection
  • More lightweight, means better economy
  • Better half-life, means the hull and structure keeps its quality, so also less maintenance

NEDSHIP is worldwide leader in manufacturing with epoxy and carbon fiber materials.

Some technical details

MAIN CHARACTERISTICS

Type of vessel                                                 Twin screw motor yacht

Type of hull                                                     Displacement hull

Hull material                                                   E-glass & epoxy composite sandwich

Main power                                                     2 x CAT C 18 marine diesels (2x 725 hp@2100 rpm)

1. Dimensions / Displacement

Length overall                                                23,80     meters                78,0     feet

Length on waterline                                      20,70     meters                  67,9    feet

Beam                                                                  6,50     meters                   21,3    feet

Design Draught                                                 1,60     meters                    5.24  feet

Design displacement                                       57.t

2. Tank Capacities*

Fuel oil                                                            4,000    litres      1.057    US gallons

Fresh water                                                      1,850   litres        489     US gallons

Grey water                                                       1,700   litres         449     US gallons

*All can be increased or altered as per client’s request.

3. Performance

Top speed at light weight                                           19 Knots

Economical cruising speed                                        15 Knots

Range at economical cruising speed               + 1000 Nautical Miles

* Actual GT for any vessel can only be determined by tonnage surveyor.

yacht skipper over 24 meter

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How much does a yacht skipper earn in Spain?

cuanto gana un patron de yate

If you are interested in knowing how much a yacht skipper in Spain can earn, you have come to the right place, where you will learn all the aspects about this amazing job.

Although, in order to be a yacht skipper in Spain, it will be necessary to be up to date with the regulations that establish the requirements to exercise this profession.

In addition, everything will depend on the activity to be performed, the size of the boat and the type of voyages, and for each case you will need a different qualification or training.

What does a yacht skipper do?

To work as a yacht skipper, some qualifications or courses are necessary, such as the title of Recreational Boat Skipper (PER) with professional qualifications, the title of Yacht Skipper with professional qualifications, or the title of Yacht Captain with professional qualifications.

In addition to the Habilitación de Patrón Profesional de Embarcaciones de Embarcaciones de Recreo, and the professional titles of the Merchant Marine, this depends on the type of remunerated activity to be exercised.

Once you obtain the title of Yacht Skipper, you will be able to sail up to a maximum distance of 150 miles from the coast and steer vessels up to 24 meters in length.

Likewise, to become a Yacht Skipper you must first obtain the title of pleasure craft skipper. In this way, the Yacht Skipper will be able to sail day and night boats and enjoy all its benefits.

How much does a yacht skipper earn?

Like any job, the yacht skipper’s salary depends on multiple factors, among them, the experience, the professional rank or category, the size of the super yacht, the references, and the negotiation of the salary.

In addition, there is a big difference if you want to work as a captain or skipper on a yacht or as a Deckhand or Auxiliary, since the skipper or captain of the yacht is the highest ranking boss, and they are responsible for the ship, therefore, they have a better salary.

But how much does a yacht skipper earn? or how much does a yacht skipper charge? The answer is simple, as their salary is generally the highest, although you should also take into account that the work as a yacht skipper is very seasonal.

The remuneration for this type of work can vary depending on the area, the usual is that a recreational yacht skipper is paid per days worked and his salary ranges between 150 euros.

On the other hand, on larger boats there are seasonal jobs where they generally hire several professionals and the monthly remuneration can be over 3,000 euros per month.

Generally, the high season lasts between June and September, and the highest demand is concentrated in July and August, so the rest of the year there may be demand for skippers on weekends.

How much does a yachtsman earn?

To work as a yachtsman or deckhand you will need navigation and maintenance skills and a certain degree of previous experience, as well as a yacht safety course.

But how much does a yacht deckhand earn? It is estimated that the salaries of Seaman in Spain, in the case of Transmediterranea, is 1642 euros per month, in Catamaran around 1236 euros per month, while, for deck hands in the Spanish Navy, 14000 euros per year.

How much does a ship’s first officer earn?

If you have ever wondered how much a ship’s first officer earns, and you still have doubts, you should know that generally the salary of captains, officers and deck officers ranges from 1,546.61 euros per month to 8,362.04 euros per month.

Related posts

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The latest and greatest yachts under 24 metres

From dazzling interiors to dashing hulls, raw power to total elegance, there is a top performer for every purpose in the 12- to 24-metre sector. BOAT unpacks the latest and greatest yachts in the sub-24-metre market, bursting with exciting new offerings...

Bluegame BGM75

Much hyped – and with justification – Bluegame’s flagship is billed as a luxury multihull, but the BGM75’s middling beam means it is something of a hybrid, with the volume of a 27-metre monohull. Philippe Briand’s efficient hulls effectively halve fuel consumption, while including a fully automated tender garage between the hulls and a huge beach club aft – only broadened by the fold-down wings. Lissoni and Zuccon International Project have designed a stunning modernist interior with three to four guest cabins, including a full-beam master.

Van der Valk Edge 65

Built for a repeat client, the Edge 65 project has proven so successful that the Dutch family-owned shipyard behind it has turned it into a semi-custom line dubbed the “ultimate weekender”. Styling by the inimitable Cor D. Rover and a Petestep hull combine to create a fast, very well-behaved boat with the sporty looks of a rugged explorer. Its draught of 92 centimetres and manoeuvrability fulfil the owner’s brief for Bahamas cruising. Larger models and different powertrains are in development.

Predator 55

Sunseeker ’s Predator range was launched to great acclaim in the 1980s, and the latest incarnation of the sub-brand sports the same blend of speed and interior comfort. A new tapering silhouette and a huge 2.5- by three-metre sunroof make this model a new departure, albeit using the same hull moulds as the Superhawk 55 . Sophisticated design language marks out the aesthetic, as do the many thoughtful details, such as fairleads and LED lighting. The cockpit is wrapped in stylish curved glass, and the master cabin below has dedicated access for privacy.

Nordhavn 80

Though launched in 2021, the Nordhavn 80 has just had a design boost courtesy of Vripack . The Dutch studio penned a “Scandi-comfy-chic” interior for boat number three and it has proven so popular that it will appear in three more hulls. It blends white-brushed American oak furniture with coffee and cream paintwork and upholstery. The boat itself has been a big success for designer and owner PAE, which subcontracts manufacturing to Taiwan.

Positioned between Windy’s yacht tenders and its classic sportscruisers, the new Sports Line offers multifunctional family boats. And the exterior of the new SR38 builds on a burgeoning relationship with design titan Espen Øino . Practicality is the order of the day here: comfort, safety and handling, but there are glam features too, like fold-down aft wings and a huge aft sunpad. The interior can be arranged as a lounge or large double cabin, with an aft cabin or more storage.

Azimut Magellano 60

With her rounded bow and an abundance of outside space, this boat has been given proud explorer looks by Ken Freivokh . But a lot of attention was paid to the hull below the waterline, too. So-called “dual mode” design makes the boat efficient at both semi-planing pace and displacement speeds. Azimut says this equates to 20 per cent lower CO2 emissions, while the steep deadrise at the bow gives stable handling. Floor-to-ceiling glazing surrounds the galley and social areas on the open main deck, while the full-beam owner’s cabin below is also very bright. Two more big guest cabins plus a captain’s cabin aft make this a flexible owner- or skipper-operated vessel.

Squeaking in under 24 metres at the waterline, the Pearl 82 will naturally offer good volumes when she hits the water this spring. But her raised pilothouse design, walkaround decks, five en suite guest cabins and room for up to three crew give her big-boat kudos. Bill Dixon ’s powerful exterior and Kelly Hoppen ’s contemporary interior combine with Pearl’ s flair for a flexible layout.

Princess Y80

Slotting into the middle of the Y range, Princess ' Y80 offers the line’s characteristic elegance, with unbroken glazing around the main deck and the signature “S” shaped hardtop. There is the option of the cunning “infinity cockpit”, whereby the touch of a button transforms it from sofa arrangement to dining mode. The flybridge, meanwhile, can be fitted with a wet bar or used for storing toys – a crane is hidden under the aft sunpad. Four guest cabins include a full-beam master amidships.

Pardo 75 T-Top

A year after launching a 23-metre flagship, Pardo has produced a new iteration of its original walkaround design. Fold-down wings and up to three 1,000-horsepower IPS drives are again options, but now guests can enjoy the shade of a dashing carbon composite T-top. The power package gives speeds up to 36 knots.

VanDutch 75

Ravenna studio Burdisso Capponi Yachts&Design injected a contemporary Mediterranean aesthetic into the design of this flagship model from VanDutch (a Cantiere del Pardo brand). The 22.3-metre is due to splash at the end of 2024. The standard layout comprises an open-plan kitchen with an owner’s cabin and twin cabin aft and a VIP cabin forward, while a second configuration sacrifices the twin to make way for a larger owner’s suite with a desk, sofa and dressing room. There’s an up-down swim platform and tender garage, while three IPS engines push the 75 to 40 knots.

Horizon V74

Built on Horizon 's proven hull of the V68, the first V74 out of the Taiwanese yard last spring was destined for Australia. It was customised to suit conditions in the region with an enclosed upper deck and four guest cabins. The yacht offers plenty of volume, with a marble-clad “country kitchen” style galley and a hi/lo dinette that serves for watching TV. The hydraulic swim platform can take a 450-kilogram tender, while the beach club is fitted with lounge seating and a wet bar.

wallyrocket51

Wally likes to say it is 20 years ahead, and the brand is hoping its new wallyrocket51 will prove it once again. Though the yard has built plenty of fast yachts for racing, this is the first time it has built an all-out one design racer. Wally is not mincing its words: it calls the wallyrocket51 the fastest sailing boat ever built. Though shorter than a TP52, the wallyrocket51 should be capable of outpacing the larger boat thanks to her ultralight carbon lay-up and an exhaustively refined hull. Botin Partners really had to do their homework here to give the boat a ratings edge. It has “spent” the ratings bonus earned from the hull shape and length on a trim tab that will help the boat point higher and make less leeway, while reducing drag as well.

Now under Italian ownership, CNB calls this new boat an evolution of the 76, with which it shares similar hull dimensions. Don’t be fooled, though, as the tooling is entirely new to give the hull more beam aft, a double chine and a glossy, curved coachroof. The boat’s DNA is that of a short-handed world cruiser with a moderate displacement and balanced rig. Accommodation has a bright and open contemporary style from Jean-Marc Piaton , with an owner’s cabin in the bow, two more guest cabins plus crew quarters.

Grand Soleil 65 LC

This Long Cruise version of Cantiere del Pardo’s 20.1-metre Grand Soleil model (it also comes in Performance mode) is tuned to blue-water cruising. Matteo Polli’s naval architecture is aimed at “less resistance, greater dynamic stability when heeling and better performance in light airs,” he says. Nauta Design planned the step-free, protected deck layout as well as the interior, with a master forward, two guest cabins aft and a two-part saloon for relaxing and dining.

Squeezing into the narrow gap between Swan ’s 48 and 55, the new 51 has a kind of totemic value to the brand – returning to the length that marked the start of its enduring collaboration with designer Germán Frers . The new project will splash in 2024, and will incorporate the lessons of its forebears. The mast has been moved slightly aft to better balance the boat, while the twin rudders give maximum performance at full heel in a blow. Choose from easy-handling comfort or a carbon-rigged sports set-up, or mix and match elements from either. Below, she has a large open saloon, with the owner’s cabin at the bow and two further cabins aft. Styling options have been curated by Misa Poggi .

Greenline 58 fly

Slovenia’s quiet yachting revolution continues with the launch of a flybridge version of Greenline ’s 58. Smart design gives three en suite guest cabins and a deep compartment under the galley for the skipper’s quarters or a handy storage or appliance space. But the chief selling point is the electric propulsion option. In classic diesel mode, you can go 29 knots with the 2,000-horsepower package. Opt for hybrid, and you get up to 25 nautical miles under electric power alone, plus abundant energy from a battery bank that charges during fast passages under diesel power. Or choose the more radical E-drive for the same electric range backed by a range-extending 50kW diesel generator.

Sialia is pretty unique in the yachting world. Yes, it is an electric vessel with a Vripack hull, but that’s not the point. The company’s founders say they’re a technology firm rather than a boatbuilder. With long backgrounds in battery and lightweight composite development, they are more focused on design than construction, which they will subcontract to a yard with the capabilities and the location to suit the owner. Twin 400kW motors give the boats a real turn of speed, with battery banks up to 1MWh in capacity to match. Fast 150kW DC charging is a must, but the kicker is that the boat’s huge power storage potential can be used to run a remote summer house or cabin for the weekend – you simply plug the house into the boat! There’s also the potential to include a hydrogen-powered range extender.

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  5. EMBOSS WATCHES YACHT SKIPPER

  6. Sailing a catamaran for the FIRST time by ourselves

COMMENTS

  1. ICC: What's the actual 24m limit?

    If the OP wants to skipper a leisure boat over 24m LLL then Yachtmaster Offshore or above is required. IMHO the raft of other legislation and warrenty checks that applies once you get into yachts this size takes the fun out of leisure boating and requires a full time Captain on board. Staying beneath 80 tonne and 24m has many advantages.

  2. Becoming a skipper: qualifications, trainings, remuneration

    It allows skippers to command pleasure boats up to 24 meters long, and up to 200 miles from the coast. It has 3 levels and each one have limitations: Coastal, Offshore and Ocean. To obtain the Yachtmaster, the candidate must be over 18 and have at least 1000 miles of navigation in 1st or 2nd category (corresponding to the distance from the coast).

  3. Which certificate to become a skipper? Capitaine 200, Yachtmaster or

    The Capitaine 200 title, issued by the Merchant Navy, is the most common on France.. The Capitaine 200 is a professional navigation title that allows you to sail as a skipper on motorboats up to 200 gross tons, which means medium-sized boats (~24 meters).It is limited to 20 miles from the coast.. With its "Sailing" module, the Capitaine 200 also allows to drive sailing boats without any ...

  4. List of certificates for operators of pleasure craft

    Boat Length: Up to 24 meters. Water Scooter: No limit. Navigation Time: No limit. Capitán de Yate ... (International Small Boat Skipper) limits: within 3/4 mile from coastal line, wind below 4 bf, LOA < 20m ... The sailing in marine waters over 20 nautical miles from coastal line requires the professional certificate. no

  5. Pleasure craft regulations

    Manning. The legislation governing the evidence of competence required for the operation of a pleasure vessel is the Merchant Shipping (Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping) Regulations 2015. The 2015 regulations do not apply to a pleasure vessel which is less than 80 GT or under 24 metres in load line length.

  6. What is the Maximum Boat Size for Day Skipper? (answer)

    In the UK you don't need a license to skipper a boat under 24 meters (or 80 gross tons). In theory you could actually skipper a 78 foot yacht with a Day Skipper qualification or even no qualification at all. But it's very rare this would ever happen, as no company will let someone with just a Day Skipper qualification charter a 24 metre yacht.

  7. 24M Bareboat Skipper

    Duration. Book Now. 24M Bareboat Skipper Course. Become a confident and competent skipper of vessels up to 24 meters in length with our five-day International Bareboat Skipper Course. This course is specifically designed for experienced boaters who want to take command of powerboats in fair weather conditions and within sight of land.

  8. Discover the Essence of Skippering: A Comprehensive Guide to Boat

    The term "skipper" holds a prominent place in the world of boating and sailing, representing the individual tasked with the operation, navigation, and overall management of a vessel.Whether it's a small boat, a luxurious yacht, or a sailing dinghy, the skipper plays a crucial role in ensuring the safety and smooth functioning of the maritime journey.

  9. RYA Yachtmaster Offshore / Yachtmaster Coastal / Master of Yachts 200

    Without RYA Coastal Skipper Practical certificate: 800 miles; 30 days; 2 days as skipper on vessels of less than 24 meters; Note: No more than half of the required miles can be on vessels over 24 meters . Yachmaster Coastal: Motor - Option 2 A & B With RYA Coastal Skipper Practical Certificate: Can be used to enter OOW 3000GT program and modules

  10. Yacht Skipper

    You can also write us an e-mail, call us, or visit us at our office. +34 683251682. [email protected]. Calle del Reloj 5, oficina 3. 36300 Baiona. Galicia, Spain. Yacht Skipper Course. Prepare to handle boats up to 24m in length with the better tools and content. Contact us.

  11. Skipper on a Yacht

    In the case of a fully crewed yacht, the responsibilities of the skipper include making sure the crew understand and carry out their roles and duties. The skipper is expected to maintain proper coordination among the crew. To sum up, the tasks and responsibilities of a skipper are both technical and interpersonal.

  12. Yacht Skipper

    Yacht Skipper Sailing, Skippers for Sailing Yachts. Check Availability and Book your Skipper for Yachts up to 24 meters, 78 feet, 12 Passengers.

  13. The best yachts from 19.5 to 24 meters in length

    Of the three nominees, the 21.1-metre Manhattan 68 has the narrowest hull - 5.26 meters, even though the boat differs from the competitors by a maximum of 19 cm. In the case of this yacht it is more difficult to distinguish one bright feature of the layout. Rather, it is a matter of generally competent design, which makes passengers feel as if ...

  14. 24m-30m yachts for sale

    Our data analysts gather valuable information about every superyacht larger than 24-metres currently for sale. With hundreds of yacht sales and transactions per year, the yachting market is a challenging one, and that's why SuperYacht Times has built this platform to help prospective owners find their perfect superyacht. Filter. 906 results.

  15. Find a skipper for your yacht: a step-by-step guide

    A skipper's responsibilities on a motorboat. The skipper's mandate transcends into several domains, such as: Navigation: as the primary navigator, the skipper is responsible for charting the course, considering factors like weather, tides, and potential hazards.. Safety: the skipper ensures compliance with all maritime laws and regulations.They conduct regular safety drills and are ...

  16. Skippering a boat for the first time: steps to success

    You will need to cover the cost of the boat, together with mooring and fuel, and then decide whether to include food, meals out, and drinks. I find that the simplest option is to share all the costs equally, and the first step is to prepare a rough budget so people have an idea of how much the trip is going to cost.

  17. 24m Classic Trawler

    24 m MY Base Information. This 24m Yacht is a wonderful piece of traditional looking yacht in combination with the latest technologies and built with the experience of over 350 projects from our shipyard. The yacht has a lot of features coming from the super yachts done by NEDSHIP, which gives a much more volume and functionality to the yacht ...

  18. How much does a yacht skipper earn in Spain?

    The remuneration for this type of work can vary depending on the area, the usual is that a recreational yacht skipper is paid per days worked and his salary ranges between 150 euros. On the other hand, on larger boats there are seasonal jobs where they generally hire several professionals and the monthly remuneration can be over 3,000 euros per ...

  19. 2023 ATX Surf Boats 24 Type-S SkipperBud's Madison

    MSRP: $157,276Sale Price: $109,427All Sale and/or Clearance Prices include all rebates and incentives.Large, bold, capable and comfortable, the ATX 24 Type-S is hitting the water to turn heads, give you more value, and unleash some serious swells. When you re ready to catch the perfect wave, just push GO and you ll get barrels right out of the box. Versatility and simplicity are built right ...

  20. The best new yachts under 24 metres

    This forward-thinking catamaran from ALVA Yachts is available with fully electric drives and comes fuel-cell ready. The new 18.4-metre Coupé version has an expansive coachroof with 80 square metres of solar cells. Battery banks store power from these and the generators, and run two 250kW electric motors, which give a top speed of 20 knots.

  21. The best yachts under 24 metres

    Sunseeker's Predator range was launched to great acclaim in the 1980s, and the latest incarnation of the sub-brand sports the same blend of speed and interior comfort.A new tapering silhouette and a huge 2.5- by three-metre sunroof make this model a new departure, albeit using the same hull moulds as the Superhawk 55.Sophisticated design language marks out the aesthetic, as do the many ...