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boggart po polsku

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A Boggart was an amortal shape-shifting non-being that took on the form of its observer's worst fear. Because of their shape-shifting ability, no one knew what a Boggart looked like when it was alone, as it changed shape instantly upon encountering someone. [1] [2]

When facing a Boggart, it was best to have someone else along, to try to confuse it, since facing more than one person at once made it indecisive towards determining what form it should take, usually resulting in a not frightening combination of the victims' fears. [1] [2]

Boggarts would, at least before the Battle of Hogwarts , very commonly appear as Lord Voldemort , since he represented the worst fear of many wizards and witches . [5]

  • 1.1 Physical appearance
  • 1.3 Defence against a Boggart
  • 1.4 Hiding places
  • 2.1 Famous Boggarts
  • 2.2.1 Late 19th century or earlier
  • 2.2.2 1910s
  • 2.2.3 1970s
  • 2.2.4 1986–1987 school year
  • 2.2.5 1988–1989 school year
  • 2.2.6 1993–1994 school year
  • 2.2.7 1994–1995 school year
  • 2.2.8 2008–2009 school year
  • 2.2.9 2010–2011 school year
  • 2.3 Number 12 Grimmauld Place
  • 2.4 Unspecified
  • 3 Known Boggart forms
  • 4 Etymology
  • 5 Behind the scenes
  • 6 Appearances
  • 7 Notes and references

Description [ ]

Physical appearance [ ].

Nobody knew what a Boggart looked like if nobody was there to see it, although it continued to exist, usually giving evidence of its presence by rattling, shaking or scratching the object in which it is hiding. Boggarts particularly liked confined spaces, but may also have been found lurking in woods and around shadowy corners. [2]

Much like Poltergeists , Boggart were non-beings , who, although they resembled living creatures , were not considered magically "alive" and were as a result amortal (a Boggart could be made to disappear with the Boggart-Banishing Spell , but it would inevitably reappear, with several more by its side at times). Much like Poltergeists with mischief and Dementors with gloom and depression, Boggarts seemed to embody the human emotion of fear, and consequently feed on other beings' fears. [2]

Boggarts' ability to shapeshift showed remarkable speed and fluidity, but had several limitations. Firstly, being confined, if nothing else, by the size of the room it inhabited, the Boggart would scale down an otherwise-gigantic form (as seen when a Boggart turned into the full moon ). [1] Secondly, though a Boggart who transformed into a magical being or object could replicate its abilities to an extent, this would be a weaker facsimile of the real thing; thus, a Boggart transformed into a Dementor had weaker magic than a real Dementor (according to Professor Lupin , who exploited this effect to simulate a Dementor attack in Harry's presence to help him perfect the use of the Patronus Charm at no serious risk to Harry Potter 's soul ). [6]

Additionally, when a witch or wizard had multiple fears that tied for their "worst," the Boggart would typically cycle through those fears, presumably randomly. For example, in August 1995 , when Molly Weasley was attempting to banish a boggart that had taken up residence in 12 Grimmauld Place , the Boggart took the form of the freshly dead bodies of her family, as well as Harry Potter, whom she loved like a son. Since she feared the deaths of all her loved ones equally, the Boggart cycled through all the corpses randomly. [7]

The extent of Boggarts' intelligence was unclear; though they sometimes took the forms of sentient beings as part of their fear-inducing transformations; [1] [8] those false "people" appeared to be little more than caricatures, acting out the motions of the victim's fear involving said people, heedless of their surroundings. [8] [9] It was worth noting however that one Boggart once settled into the form of a human killer, foregoing individual transformations, and successfully posed as this man for a long period of time; and Boggarts' closest-known "relatives", Poltergeists and Dementors, both possessed sapience. [2]

Though they could not see other non-beings like Dementors, Muggles could sometimes see Boggarts; however, as most Muggles refused to acknowledge anything that might even be considered somewhat magical , the glimpses they caught of Boggarts were usually dismissed as mere hallucinations or figments of the viewer's imagination. This denial was helped by the fact that Muggles rarely saw Boggarts plainly, due to their favoured haunts being dark places away from the public eye. [2]

Boggarts were capable of leaving a dark presence in spaces they once inhabited, that could be felt by humans . [4]

Defence against a Boggart [ ]

A Boggart in the wardrobe

The incantation for the Boggart-Banishing Spell was Riddikulus . The charm required a strong mind and good concentration. The incantation and wand movement alone would not affect a Boggart. The spell could be tricky, because it involved making the creature into a figure of fun, so that fear could be dispelled in amusement. If the caster was able to laugh aloud at the Boggart, it would disappear at once. The intention was to force the Boggart to assume a less-threatening and hopefully comical form. [1] [2]

In September 1993 , this charm was taught by Remus Lupin during a third-year Defence Against the Dark Arts lesson at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry . [1]

Having multiple people facing one Boggart may have reduced its effectiveness of frightening its victims, since it would not have been able to determine which form to take. [1]

A Boggart also gained the weaknesses of whatever they turned into. For example if it turned into a Dementor , it could be repelled by a Patronus Charm like a normal Dementor. [6] A Boggart in the form of a Dementor could also trip over its robes, revealing its true nature. [10]

Hiding places [ ]

Boggarts were particularly fond of inhabiting dark, confined spaces, such as in wardrobes, the gap beneath beds, and the cupboards under sinks and desks. [2] On at least one occasion, a boggart was found hiding in a grandfather clock. [1] They also liked shadowy corners. [2]

Known encounters [ ]

Famous boggarts [ ].

Famous Boggarts included the Old Boggle of Canterbury (believed by local Muggles to be a mad, cannibalistic hermit that lived in a cave; in reality a particularly small Boggart that had learnt how to make the most of echoes). [2]

The Bludgeoning Boggart of Old London Town (a Boggart that had taken on the form of a murderous thug that prowled the back streets of 19th century London , but could be reduced to a hamster with one simple incantation . [2]

The Screaming Bogey of Strathtully (a Scottish Boggart that had fed on the fears of local Muggles to the point that it had become an elephantine black shadow with glowing white eyes, but which Lyall Lupin of the Ministry of Magic eventually trapped in a matchbox). [2]

Hogwarts [ ]

Late 19th century or earlier [ ].

There was an old cupboard in a room in Hogwarts Castle containing a powerful Boggart that five professors had to defeat. They were barely able to repel it as it shifted between various forms, including a werewolf , tornado , a plate of haggis , a Hungarian Horntail and someone's mother-in-law . [11]

Near the end of the 1890–1891 school year , Fifth year students trained in repelling Boggarts under the supervision of Professor Dinah Hecat . During the lesson, Natsai Onai saw the Boggart turn into an unidentified adult man, and used the Boggart-Banishing Spell to change it into an inoffensive cat . [12]

In the 1910s, professor Albus Dumbledore taught students how to confront a Boggart and learn the spell to banish it. When Newt Scamander 's Boggart turned into a desk, Dumbledore commented on its unexpected nature and kindly inquired why it took this form. Newt confessed that his greatest fear was being stuck working in an office. After Newt successfully dispatched the Boggart, Dumbledore encouraged Leta Lestrange to take her turn. Dumbledore reassured Leta that being afraid of something wasn't shameful. The form of Leta's Boggart surprised both Dumbledore and the entire class: a white sheet containing an indistinguishable, slight form floating through a dark blue glow. The event badly shook Leta. [13]

At some point during his time at Hogwarts Jacob opened the Vault of Fear , releasing the Boggarts that guarded it onto the school grounds. Once he resealed the vault, the Boggarts were again locked away.

1986–1987 school year [ ]

During the 1986–1987 school year, the Vault of Fear was again tampered with, which caused a large number of Boggarts to appear in an unusually high frequency around the school. One incident involved a Boggart appearing in a greenhouse during a Herbology class, scaring Penny Haywood . [14] Jacob's sibling learned from Rubeus Hagrid that Boggarts had not been seen on the school ground's since Jacob's school days. [15] Jacob's sibling learnt from one of Jacob's notebooks that the Boggarts were active due to Vault of Fear having been tampered with. [16] Jacob's sibling learnt the Boggart-Banishing Spell with Tulip Karasu , and defeated two Boggarts with it; one in the Artefact Room for Tulip, and another in Jacob's room . [9] After Jacob's sibling and friends opened the vault and defeated the Boggarts guarding it, the curse was broken and Boggarts stopped appearing so often. [17] [18]

1988–1989 school year [ ]

During the 1988–1989 school year, Professor Patricia Rakepick taught her fifth-year Defence Against the Dark Arts students about how to defend against a Boggart. She instructed Jacob's sibling to give a demonstration. A Boggart in the form of Lord Voldemort rose from the chest, and was defeated by Jacob's sibling. [19]

1993–1994 school year [ ]

Remus Lupin drawing the Boggart's attention away from Harry Potter

In 1993 , Professor Remus Lupin taught his third-year Defence Against the Dark Arts students about how to defend against a Boggart. He took the class to the staffroom, where a Boggart had moved into a wardrobe the previous afternoon. After explaining what they would need to do, Professor Lupin let the class, starting with Neville Longbottom , perform the Riddikulus charm on the Boggart. When the Boggart moved towards Harry Potter , Lupin drew the Boggart's attention, causing it to turn into a full moon (as he was in fact a werewolf ), then had Neville finish it off, banishing it for good. [1]

Later, Professor Lupin explained that the reason he didn't let Harry face the Boggart was that he thought Harry's Boggart would turn into Lord Voldemort , and he didn't want to panic the students. [20] Harry's Boggart actually took on the form of a Dementor , [6] as he had an encounter with them on the way to Hogwarts that year and heard his mother's dying moments whenever they came near. [21]

To help Harry, Professor Lupin taught him how to perform the Patronus , using a Boggart found in Argus Filch 's filing cabinet as a substitute for a real Dementor. In between the private lessons , Professor Lupin kept the Boggart in a cabinet under the desk, in his office. [6]

At the end of the school year, Lupin used another Boggart as part of his third year exams , as the final obstacle in a series. [8]

1994–1995 school year [ ]

TriwizardMaze PM B4C31M1 DementorInTriwizardMaze Moment

A Boggart in the form of a Dementor in the Triwizard Maze

On 24 June 1995 , Harry Potter came across a Boggart in the Triwizard Maze during the Third Task of the Triwizard Tournament of that year, in the form of a Dementor . Harry initially thought the Boggart was actually a Dementor, thus casting his Patronus, and realised that the creature was in fact a Boggart when it fell back and tripped over the hem of its robes instead of being driven back, as a real Dementor would have done. [10]

2008–2009 school year [ ]

During the 2008–2009 school year, Professor Brindlemore taught her first-year Defence Against the Dark Arts students how to repel Boggarts. A Boggart also existed in one of the cupboards in the Headmaster's office , which some students unleashed due to wanting to use the Pensieve in the cupboard. It was faced by Daniel Page first and changed into a dragon , and later into an evil version of Ivy Warrington herself when she faced it. [22]

2010–2011 school year [ ]

Masked wizard Boggarts MA

Boggarts in the form of masked wizards

During the 2010–2011 school year, a Boggart was present in Neville Longbottom's storeroom , which changed into the form of a masked wizard from NOTME when it was discovered by Linderina Crane , letting her believe it was a real wizard. She cast the Incarcerous Spell on the Boggart, but it remained unharmed and started to cast spells towards her. When students came to the rescue, two more masked wizard Boggarts appeared. [22]

Daniel facing Boggart MA

Daniel listening to the Boggart

After they were almost defeated, when Daniel Page faced a Boggart, it changed into the form of his mother Kaleena being an Azkaban convict. Realising that it could help him see his mother again, Daniel went back to the room some time later and listened to the Boggart talk. His friend then arrived and faced the Boggart themself, making it turn into an Acromantula , and cast the Boggart-Banishing Spell which gave the Boggart roller skates. [22]

Number 12 Grimmauld Place [ ]

While cleaning up 12 Grimmauld Place , the new headquarters of the reconvened Order of the Phoenix , Molly Weasley stumbled across what she thought was a Boggart in a locked cabinet of a writing desk. She decided to wait for Alastor Moody to confirm it was a Boggart, before opening the cabinet. [23]

After escaping from the party being held in celebration of Ron Weasley and Hermione Granger becoming Prefects , Harry heard sobbing coming from the drawing room. When he looked inside, Harry saw Mrs Weasley cowering against a dark wall, and the body of her son, Ron, sprawled on the floor. After Molly tried the Riddikulus charm without success, Ron's body turned into the body of Bill Weasley , with his eyes wide open and empty. Molly's next attempt turned Bill's body into Arthur Weasley , with blood running down his face. The next attempts turned the boggart into Fred and George Weasley , Percy Weasley , and then Harry. [7]

Harry shouted to Mrs Weasley that she should leave, causing Remus Lupin and Sirius Black to run into the room, followed by Alastor Moody. Lupin quickly figured out what had happened, and made the Boggart turn from Harry's dead body to the full moon, then with a wave of his wand, made the orb vanish in a puff of smoke. [7]

Unspecified [ ]

Although the precise details of this encounter are unknown, Lupin mentioned during his first Defence Against the Dark Arts lesson in 1993 that he had once had an encounter with a Boggart in the company of at least two other people where the Boggart, attempting to frighten two people at once, turned itself into half a slug (One person was afraid of a Flesh-Eating Slug and the other was afraid of headless corpses). [1]

Known Boggart forms [ ]

The following individuals all had Voldemort as their Boggart form, and after performing the Boggart-Banishing Spell , Lord Voldemort would turn into a baby and suck on a dummy: [5]

Etymology [ ]

In English mythology, a Boggart (or bogart, bogan, bogle or boggle) is a household spirit , sometimes mischievous, sometimes helpful.

Behind the scenes [ ]

Boggart Snape (old edition)

A Boggart imitating Severus Snape (2004 edition)

Boggart Snape (new 2018 edition)

A Boggart imitating Severus Snape (2018 edition)

Boggart POP

A Boggart imitating Severus Snape as a POP! Vinyl

  • Lupin's Boggart, the full moon, indicated his dread of his transformations into a werewolf. However, the Boggart failed to frighten him because it is not the moon itself he feared, but its effect on him.
  • The Boggarts in Harry Potter are more similar to the Bogeyman, being found in closets, under furniture, and cupboards and able to transform into one's worst fear.
  • "Boggart" is the favourite word/line from the series of Actor David Thewlis (Remus Lupin). [31]
  • It is possible that the Boggart knows ways to symbolise these fears; for example, in the case of a person with Hydrophobia, showing the viewer their drowned corpse. This is supported in canon by Lord Voldemort (who feared death) seeing his own corpse, Remus Lupin (who feared his werewolf transformation) seeing the full moon, and Hermione (who feared failure) seeing Professor McGonagall telling her that she failed all of her exams. Mrs Weasley feared her loved ones dying, so the Boggart showed her loved one's corpses in succession, which supports this theory even further.
  • It could be possible that if someone who has no fear attempts to engage a Boggart, it will not be able to decide what to turn into and will be forced to show its true form.
  • In Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban , Remus Lupin mentions that no one knows what a Boggart looks like when it is alone. Alastor Moody , in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix , is able to determine through his "mad" eye that a creature hiding in 12 Grimmauld Place is definitely a Boggart. It is assumed that Moody knew what a Boggart looked like in its true form as the Boggart had not seen him and shape-shifted.
  • In Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban , Remus Lupin gives Harry private lessons on how to defeat Dementors, using a Boggart as a replacement. However, when Harry faced the Boggart the first and second time, when he failed to beat it, the Boggart/Dementor had managed to make Harry hear his mother's screams. This may imply that Boggarts can gain some abilities of the thing it morphs into. It also gained its weakness as it was easily defeated by Harry's Patronus .
  • In an early script for the film adaptation of Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban , there were several differences from the final cut of the film. The Boggarts for Neville, Ron, Harry, and Professor Lupin remained the same. Parvati's, however, would have been a vampire (specifically Count Dracula [32] which would have been dressed like Carmen Miranda (presumably referring to her famous fruit hat outfit from the film The Gang's All Here ) when the Boggart-Banishing Charm was used on it, with Dean having the cobra boggart Parvati has in the actual film. [33]
  • J. K. Rowling has stated that her Boggart would be the same as Molly Weasley 's: her loved ones dead or alternatively herself buried alive. In an earlier interview, however, before the publication of Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix , she suggested Aragog as a possible Boggart for her, as she hates spiders. [34]
  • The Boggart may have been inspired by the "Clutterbumph" from Manxmouse , of which Harry Potter series author J.K. Rowling is a known fan. [35] The Clutterbumph is described as follows: "...something that is not there until one imagines it. And as it is always someone different who will be doing the imagining, no two Clutterbumphs are ever exactly alike. Whatever it is that frightens one the most and that is just about the worst thing one can think of, that is what a Clutterbumph looks like."
  • The Boggart also bears a resemblance to the Cucuy , a monster in Hispanic and Latino folklore. Like the Cucuy, the Boggart lives in dark areas such as beneath beds and inside closets, and has the ability to change its shape at will.
  • In Harry Potter: Hogwarts Mystery , Jacob's sibling 's Boggart of Voldemort is turned into a clown after casting the Boggart-Banishing Spell ; the clown Voldemort will then dance in the same style as Pennywise from the 2017 adaption . Later Barnaby Lee will admit that he found clown Voldemort even more intimidating due to his coulrophobia .
  • Harry Potter and Neville Longbottom are the two known characters to have results for their respective Boggarts and outcomes featured in the film adaptation, the LEGO game, and the GBA game, and all true to the depictions in the books with no alterations.
  • In the film and video game adaptations of the series, changes were made to the following individual's Boggart form and Boggart-Banishing Spell outcome:

Appearances [ ]

Wiki

  • Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban (First appearance)
  • Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban (film)
  • Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban (video game)
  • Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
  • Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (film) (Appears in deleted scene(s)) (Mentioned only)
  • Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix
  • Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix (film) (Flashback in Disc 2)
  • Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (Possible appearance)
  • Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 (Possible appearance)
  • Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 (video game)
  • Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald - The Original Screenplay (Appears in flashback(s))
  • Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald (Appears in flashback(s))
  • Wizarding World
  • LEGO Harry Potter: Building the Magical World
  • LEGO Harry Potter
  • LEGO Harry Potter: Years 1-4
  • LEGO Harry Potter: Years 5-7 (Possible appearance)
  • Harry Potter: The Character Vault
  • Harry Potter: The Creature Vault
  • Harry Potter: Hogwarts Mystery
  • Harry Potter: Wizards Unite
  • Harry Potter: Puzzles & Spells
  • Harry Potter: Magic Awakened
  • Hogwarts Legacy

Notes and references [ ]

  • ↑ 1.00 1.01 1.02 1.03 1.04 1.05 1.06 1.07 1.08 1.09 1.10 1.11 1.12 1.13 1.14 1.15 1.16 1.17 1.18 1.19 1.20 1.21 1.22 1.23 1.24 1.25 1.26 1.27 Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban , Chapter 7 ( The Boggart in the Wardrobe )
  • ↑ 2.00 2.01 2.02 2.03 2.04 2.05 2.06 2.07 2.08 2.09 2.10 2.11 2.12 2.13 2.14 2.15 2.16 Writing by J. K. Rowling: "Boggart" at  Wizarding World
  • ↑ Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire , Chapter 14 ( The Unforgivable Curses )
  • ↑ 4.0 4.1 Harry Potter: Wizards Unite ( SOS Task Force Training - Calamity Essentials II: Not So Riddikulus. - "In a Defence Against the Dark Arts classroom, you examine a cupboard that once housed a Boggart. The Boggart's departure left the cupboard undeniably bare, yet you are attuned enough to feel a dark presence reaching for you.')
  • ↑ 5.0 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 LEGO Harry Potter: Years 1-4
  • ↑ 6.0 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.5 Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban , Chapter 12 ( The Patronus )
  • ↑ 7.0 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.4 7.5 Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix , Chapter 9 ( The Woes of Mrs Weasley )
  • ↑ 8.0 8.1 8.2 8.3 Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban , Chapter 16 ( Professor Trelawney's Prediction )
  • ↑ 9.0 9.1 9.2 9.3 9.4 Harry Potter: Hogwarts Mystery , Year 3, Chapter 7 ( Jacob's Room )
  • ↑ 10.0 10.1 10.2 Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire , Chapter 31 ( The Third Task )
  • ↑ Hogwarts Legacy - see video
  • ↑ Hogwarts Legacy , Main Quest " The House Cup "
  • ↑ 13.0 13.1 13.2 13.3 13.4 13.5 13.6 13.7 13.8 13.9 Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald - The Original Screenplay , Scene 69
  • ↑ 14.0 14.1 14.2 Harry Potter: Hogwarts Mystery , Year 3, Chapter 1 ( Year Three Begins ) - Herbology Lesson "Valerian Sprigs"
  • ↑ Harry Potter: Hogwarts Mystery , Year 3, Chapter 2 ( Boggarts and Butterbeer )
  • ↑ Harry Potter: Hogwarts Mystery , Year 3, Chapter 5 ( Tulip Karasu )
  • ↑ 17.0 17.1 17.2 17.3 17.4 Harry Potter: Hogwarts Mystery , Year 3, Chapter 9 ( The Vault of Fear )
  • ↑ Harry Potter: Hogwarts Mystery , Year 3, Chapter 10 ( Among Friends )
  • ↑ Harry Potter: Hogwarts Mystery , Year 5, Chapter 8 ( Trial by Fire )
  • ↑ Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban , Chapter 8 ( Flight of the Fat Lady )
  • ↑ Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban , Chapter 5 ( The Dementor )
  • ↑ 22.0 22.1 22.2 22.3 22.4 22.5 22.6 22.7 22.8 22.9 Harry Potter: Magic Awakened
  • ↑ Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix , Chapter 5 ( The Order of the Phoenix )
  • ↑ 24.0 24.1 J.K. Rowling Web Chat Transcript
  • ↑ 25.0 25.1 Harry Potter: Hogwarts Mystery , Year 3, "SHADOWS OF THE DARK LORD" Achievement
  • ↑ Hogwarts Legacy , Side Quest " Venomous Valour "
  • ↑ Hogwarts Legacy , Main Quest " The Caretaker's Lunar Lament "
  • ↑ 28.0 28.1 Writing by J. K. Rowling: "Remus Lupin" at  Wizarding World
  • ↑ 29.0 29.1 Hogwarts Legacy - see this video
  • ↑ "About the Books: transcript of J.K. Rowling's live interview on Scholastic.com," Scholastic.com, 16 October 2000 at Accio Quote!
  • ↑ YouTube video
  • ↑ Yana Yanezic's agency profile
  • ↑ Prisoner of Azkaban script at the Internet Movie Script Database (archived here via the Internet Archive's Wayback Machine)
  • ↑ Harry Potter: Meet J. K. Rowling - October 16, 2000 interview
  • ↑ Accio Quote - The story behind the Potter legend
  • ↑ 25 Years of Pennywise the Clown
  • Harry Potter
  • 1 Tom Riddle
  • 2 Harry Potter
  • 3 Gellert Grindelwald

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Muggles' Guide to Harry Potter/Magic/Boggart

  • 2 Extended Description
  • 4 Questions
  • 5 Greater Picture

Overview [ edit | edit source ]

A boggart is a shapeshifter that usually lurks in dark spaces. It has no definite form, taking the shape of that which is most feared by the person who encounters it. When not in the sight of a person, it is believed to look like a dark blob.

Extended Description [ edit | edit source ]

To repel or destroy a boggart, it must be laughed at. The spell Riddikulus can be cast to force the boggart to assume a generally amusing shape of what the caster mentally conceives.

In Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban , the Boggart appears three times.

  • In Professor Lupin's Defence Against the Dark Arts class , we are introduced to the Boggart and his characteristics, and the fact that this allows us to see people's deepest fears; this also allows us a comical jab at Professor Snape , as Neville produces a simulacrum of Snape dressed in his grandmother's favorite outfit. Lupin does prevent Harry from triggering the Boggart's defence mechanism, which Harry feels is unfair; but Lupin later explains this as being done to prevent a simulacrum of Lord Voldemort from appearing in front of the class. This in particular shows that Lupin is much more aware of the class and its needs and concerns than any of the other Defence Against the Dark Arts teachers that have preceded him in the series.
  • Later, Lupin uses a second Boggart to train Harry in the use of the Patronus charm and its use against Dementors .
  • Either this same Boggart, or a third one, is then used in the final exam for Defence Against the Dark Arts . In this, we see Hermione's insecurity about her grades – her greatest fear is revealed to be " Professor McGonagall – she said I failed everything!" And apparently this is such a great fear that she is unable to invoke Riddikulus against it.

In Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire , Harry encounters a Boggart in the final task of the Triwizard Tournament . It takes the form of a Dementor upon seeing Harry.

In Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix , a Boggart is discovered in a desk in the Headquarters of the Order . It is identified by Alastor Moody using his magical eye, whereupon Mrs. Weasley goes to eliminate it. Ultimately she is unable to, and Remus Lupin, possibly alerted by Mad-Eye Moody, arrives to vanquish it and rescue her.

Analysis [ edit | edit source ]

The Boggart has two main purposes in the series: one is to reveal characters' deepest fears, as the Mirror Erised reveals their deepest desires; the other is to give Harry a "dementor" that he can battle, without risking having his soul sucked out. The latter is the most important, as Harry will be called upon to fight Dementors, and must somehow be prepared for that struggle; but their ability to show the greatest fears of the characters will prove useful as well.

The appearance of the Boggart in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix is particularly interesting, not for the fact of the Boggart, but for the illumination it provides. This episode allows Harry to see what Mrs. Weasley's greatest fears are: that her family, or Harry himself, might end up dead. Naturally, Harry is surprised to see that his well-being is so important to Mrs. Weasley, though he does not comment on it at the time. His thoughts are more about his recent upset at having been passed over for Prefectship , and the realization of just how trivial that was relative to the other possible outcomes for the next few years. The author does not explicitly show us the effect this revelation has on Harry in the long term, but it would be safe to say that Harry is heartened by the discovery that there is someone in the world who cares so much about him.

It is somewhat illuminating to note the form Boggarts take when confronted with specific characters in the story. For Ron , a confirmed arachnophobe, it is an Acromantula . Hermione is confronted with the spectre of failing all her courses. Harry, as mentioned, is forced to deal with a Dementor, while Neville faces Professor Snape, and Mrs. Weasley sees, in succession, the death of all her family members and Harry. The Boggart taking the shape of an animated, severed hand for Seamus Finnigan tells us little, but it taking the shape of a full moon when confronted by Lupin would tell us a great deal, if we recognized it as a full moon. It can be interesting to speculate on what other characters would see; Ginny , following the events in the Chamber of Secrets the previous year, might be expected to see herself as a puppet, or to see a puppet master; Fred and George , we suspect, would each see the other, dead, though it is uncertain if a Boggart would ever find one of them alone; and it is a safe assumption that Voldemort would see his own lifeless body.

In connection with this, we note the apparent mindlessness of the Boggart's response. Specifically when confronted by Lupin, the Boggart becomes a small, and pointless, simulacrum of the full moon. It does not change even when Lupin casually brushes it aside, indicating an unawareness that its understanding of Lupin's deepest fear is deeply flawed. This indicates that the Boggart's response is automatic, rather than reasoned, and that the lack of a fear response by the target of the Boggart's illusion is not something that the Boggart can react to.

Questions [ edit | edit source ]

Study questions are meant to be left for each student to answer; please don't answer them here.

  • In Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban , Professor Lupin says "Nobody knows what a boggart looks like when he is alone," yet in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix , Alastor Moody is able to identify it immediately, before it is released from the desk. What did Moody see with his magical eye?
  • Why does a boggart have the full effect on Harry when it turns into a Dementor but it does not make Lupin a werewolf when it turns into a full moon?
  • What parallels can be drawn between the effects of boggarts and the Mirror of Erised ?
  • Our immediate suspicion is that Voldemort, confronted by a boggart, would see his own corpse. Are there other images that could be presented? Support your answer.

Greater Picture [ edit | edit source ]

There is some conflicting information about the effects of Boggarts. In particular, the Boggart-as-Dementor that Harry is using to learn the Patronus charm affects him exactly as the true Dementors do, weakening him and allowing him to hear his mother's and father's final minutes. Yet the boggart-as-full-moon that appears in Lupin's Defence Against the Dark Arts class, and the similar effect occurring when Lupin confronts the Boggart in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix , do not cause him to turn into a werewolf.

Uncharacteristically, when Harry encounters the Boggart-as-Dementor in the maze in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire , he recognizes it as a Boggart because it trips over its own robes. This is a very uncharacteristic revelation, not something we would expect of a Boggart, and can only be explained by our later understanding that the false Alastor Moody was watching Harry's progress through the maze and eliminating obstacles. Likely he could not eliminate the Boggart, and so made it clumsy to tip Harry off.

boggart po polsku

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Boggart (also called a bogey, bogeyman , bogle or bugbear ) is a term used for a creature in English folklore. It is generally a household spirit turned malevolent trickster or mishcevious goblin-like creature. The name is derived from the Welsh "bwg".

  • 1.1 The Farmer and the Devil
  • 1.2 Appearance
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Myths & Legends [ ]

When a hobgoblin is teased or misused excessively, it will become a Boggart — creatures whose sole existence is to play tricks and cause trouble for people. They can be mischievous, frightening, and even dangerous, and they are very difficult to get rid of. Boggarts also tend to punish those who offend them and in some cases are trying to punish a human for injustice.

Household boggarts can cause things to disappear, milk to sour, and dogs to go lame. Boggarts thought to live in marshes or swamps caused the disappearance of children.

In some cases, boggarts were thought to be "buried", similar to vampires, with a stake driven through the body.

The boggarts in Lancashire, England, were believed to have a leader known as Owd Hob , a horned, hooved creature similar in shape to a satyr .

The Farmer and the Devil [ ]

In one story, known sometimes as "The Farmer and the Devil", a farmer bought a patch of land that was inhabited by the boggart. When the farmhe attempted to cultivate the field the boggart got angry, but after much arguing they decided to work the land together and share the bounty. The farmer, however, being greedy, began to ponder a way to cheat the boggart out of his share. When they were debating what to plant, he asked the boggart, "Which half of the crop do you want for your share, the part below the ground or the part above it?" The boggart thought for a while before answering "The part below the ground". The farmer sowed the field with barley. At harvest time the farmer boasted a big pile of barley while all the boggart had to show for his work was stubble. It flew into a rage and screeched that next time it would take what lay above the ground.

The next time the farmer sowed the field with potatoes. At harvest time the farmer laughed as he claimed his massive pile of potatoes while the boggart was yet again left with nothing to show for his efforts. Simmering with rage, the boggart stormed off, never to return again.

Appearance [ ]

Boggarts vary in size and general appearance but many are depicted with humanoid features. Boggarts, though usually small, could be as big as a small calf. Some boggarts could take on the form of animals, such as horses.

Modern Depictions [ ]

BOGGARTHP

A boggart as a full moon in Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban .

Literature [ ]

  • One appears frequently as a main character in the Spiderwick Chronicles by Tony DiTerlizzi and Holly Black.
  • They are known as "Boggles" in the Chronicles of Narnia by C.S. Lewis.
  • In the Harry Potter series by J.K. Rowling, boggarts change form depending on the greatest fear of the nearest person.
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essay on culture and tradition of bihar

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Bihar Culture – Exploring the Rich Tradition, Art, Music, Food and Festivals

Eesani Dey

  • Culture of Indian States
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Bihar Culture

Bihar and its cultural significance are as old as civilization itself. Bihar was once a hub of the richest and the most diverse ethnicity. The epics Ramayana and Mahabharata, and Buddhism, all have had a crucial role in building the rich culture of Bihar. Some great mythological characters are in deep association with the state.

At present, Bihar’s tradition has influences from its neighbouring states. With Nepal, Jharkhand, Uttar Pradesh , and West Bengal in the North, South, West, and East, respectively, a cultural mix is seen in the state.

Here we will look into Bihar’s rich cultural history, tradition, cuisines, and everything that makes the state stand out uniquely.

History of Bihar

Bihar Culture - History

Hindu mythology has a dominant role in enriching Bihar with ancient tradition. Both the epics, Ramayana and Mahabharata, have a strong connection with the state.

  • Maharishi Valmiki, the writer of the epic Ramayana, lived in Bihar. Sita, the wife of Lord Ram, was born in Mithila, a village in Bihar.
  • From Mahabharata, Karna-the great warrior, also has a connection with the state. King Karna was the ruler of Anga. Anga is located in present-day Bihar.

Bihar has a very vibrant history. Ancient mythology and the rise of Buddhism are important events that have taken place in the land of Bihar. Even the record from our school textbooks has important episodes of dynasties ruling over Bihar.

Mauryan Dynasty

The empire of the Great King Ashoka of the Mauryan Dynasty was spread across South India. The capital of this great empire was Pataliputra, present-day Patna in Bihar.

Under the rule of Chandragupta Maurya and Emperor Ashoka, Bihar housed some of the greatest Buddhist monasteries. The state is an architectural wonder because of the pillars and inscriptions of Ashoka.

Bihar Culture - Buddism

Bihar takes pride in being the land where Buddhism got one of its significant historical moments. Gautam Buddha attained his enlightenment in Bodh Gaya. The Bodhi Tree under which Buddha found nirvana is now a spiritual shrine for Buddhists. The Mahabodhi Tree stands tall in the middle of the Mahabodhi Temple Complex in Bodh Gaya, which is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Architecture of Bihar

Architecture-of-Bihar

In the historic period, Bihar’s Neolithic and other prehistoric men passed down their art tradition to their descendants. Many architectural remains still survive to bridge the gap between prehistoric men and their historic successors.

The majority of the early Mauryan buildings and pieces of art were made of wood. The ancient city of Pataliputra’s pillars and walls were all made of wood and displayed excellent craftsmanship.

In Pre-Ashokan Magadha, literacy sources, Sanskrit and Pali, provide undeniable evidence of the presence of a highly developed art other than sculptures. 

Architecture-of-Bihar-Mauryan-Style

When Megasthenes came to visit the capital, Chandragupta’s palace was in all of its Mauryan glory. A set of hypostyle halls with wood pillars encircled by vines embossed in gold and adorned with gold and silver motifs of birds and greenery. The city of Pataliputra, which was built along the Ganges’ banks, was encircled by a magnificent timber wall with apertures for archers and was ringed on all sides by a wide and deep moat. Bastions with over 500 towers were erected at regular intervals. There were a total of sixty-four gates that allowed people to access. During the Mauryan period, great stone monuments began to develop in Bihar, signalling a shift in architectural patterns.

Suggested Read –  The Historical Ruins of Nalanda

The ancient Magadhans were aware of the utilisation of burnt bricks and lime ‘Sudha’. Pillars, windows, and stairwells were all included in the construction of the houses. There are several references to towns, palaces, and pavilions throughout the ‘Jatakas.’ A wall surrounded fortified cities and palaces, with entrances, watchtowers, and ditches on the outside. Different classes of people occupied specific quarters made aside for them in the cities, which had well-planned streets. Human figures, creepers, flowers, animals and birds, mountains and the sea were frequently depicted in paintings on the walls of the structures.

Architecture-of-Bihar-Sanchi-Stupa

The Stupa was an essential element of Mauryan Bihar’s architectural achievement. The word stupa simply means ‘something raised,’ and it is a Buddhist architectural term for a mount carrying Buddha’s relics. Ashoka was the architect of towns, hard rock Stupas and Viharas, rock-art Chaitya-halls, palaces, and stone pillars. The pillars are considered the pinnacle of Mauryan art. Magadha’s masons carved natural forms of animals and plants into stone, as well as reducing and shaping bigger quantities of granite into pillars.

Tradition & Culture of Bihar

Bihar Culture - Tradition

Bihar’s history is very vast and will require an entire article to give every detail. Taking a cue from the brief history above, let us now look into Bihar’s tradition.

Hinduism and Buddhism seem to have a stronghold in the state. But Bihar also hones influence of Jainism, Sikhism, Islam, and Christian traditions.

In present-day Bihar, people of diverse traditions have found home on this land. Each practice with its distinctive attributes adds vibrancy to the place.

Language of Bihar 

Bihar Culture - Language

Hindi is the dominant and official language of Bihar. Urdu is also in wide use in 15 districts, making it the second official language. Maithili and its dialect Bajjika, Bhojpuri, Angika, and Magadhi are other languages in everyday use.

Here is the main topic of our article. So far, given the history and traditions, Bihar holds we can conclude that the culture must be equally rich. Let us now look at the diverse culture that Bihar takes pride in.

Art & Craft of Bihar

Bihar Culture - Art, culture

The myths and legends in association with the state have been a great source of influence for the artists of Bihar since the old days. Mithila being the birthplace of Sita, episodes of the Ramayana are a common theme.

Madhubani art form was born in Mithila. The Madhubani art form is a pride of Bihar that has become popular worldwide. Originally the Madhubani paintings were done by women with vegetable dyes for decoration on the walls. Once a visiting artist inspired the ladies to start painting this art form on paper. The Madhubani art form came out of its regional borders and spread across the nation and later the world.

Other art forms like stone pottery, bamboo crafts, white metal statues, leather goods, and wooden toys are also famous in Bihar. These art forms, along with Madhubani, have made Bihar gain a lot of popularity on a global scale.

Dance and Music of Bihar

Folk-Dances-of-Bihar

Bihar has a stronghold in the field of performing arts also. Folk songs, folk dance, and classical music are part of the rich culture of Bihar.

Folk songs of Bihar are a beautiful recital of daily rural life. Daily and common themes are central to folk songs. These folk songs are a must during special occasions like weddings, festivals, and other important ceremonies. Bihar is a land of agriculture. Some folk songs are primarily a part of the harvesting periods. The names of some of the folk songs of Bihar are-

  • Sumangali  – for weddings
  • Sohar  – for the birth of a child
  • Ropnigeet  – during the sowing paddy season
  • Katnigeet  – during the season of paddy harvesting

Folk dance is also equally vital in the culture of Bihar. Like the folk songs and their usage, folk dance also takes an important place during special occasions. Some of the folk dances of Bihar are-

  • Chhau Dance – a tribal war dance
  • Jat-Jatin Dance – the Dance is foreplay and narrative of the life of husband and wife while wearing masks.
  • Bidesia – a dance drama popular in the Bhojpuri-speaking area of Bihar.

Other season or harvest theme folk dances are-

  • Jhijian Dance – in praise of Lord Indra during the season of drought.
  • Kajari Dance – to welcome the rainy season
  • Harvesting Dance – men and women, while working on the fields during the harvesting season, perform this Dance.
  • Holi Dance – during the national festival of Holi, Bihar also celebrates the festival in its unique style.

Indian Classical music has a considerable contribution from Bihar. Bharat Ratna Ustad Bismillah Khan hails from Bihar. Poets like  Vidyapati Thakur and dhrupad singers like the Malliks and the Mishras have many gifts to Maithili music.

Festivals of Bihar

Bihar Culture - Chatt Puja

Bihar has a range of celebrations for which the people keep anticipating and preparing annually.

The most famous festivals of Bihar are-

  • Chatth Puja – Chatth Puja is the most famous festival in the state which celebrates the Sun God. The 4-day long festival usually takes place in November. Bihar comes to life during this festival. People observe a pious and spiritual life during this time. Traditional songs and music are a constant accompaniment for the celebration.
  • Ram Navami – Ram Navami is a major Hindu festival celebrated in Bihar with much grandeur. This celebration recalls the auspicious birth of Rama, the protagonist of the Ramayana. Fasts are observed, temples are decorated, and prayers are offered in his honour. People pray for the community’s health and prosperity.

Other festivities of the Bihar culture are-

  • Makar Sankranti – marks the beginning of the Summer season.
  • Sama- Chakeva – this festival is authentic to the Mithila region during the winter season.
  • Bihula – a speciality of the Bhagalpur district, the festival is in honour of Goddess Mansa to pray for the welfare of one’s family.
  • Shravani Mela – takes place every year in the month of Shravan (July-August). It is a month-long rite that takes place along a 108-kilometre stretch between the cities of Deogarh and Sultanganj.

Sonepur Cattle Fair – takes place in the Bihar town of Sonepur and is Asia’s largest cattle fair. It occurs on Kartik Purnima, the first full moon after the Diwali celebration.

Traditional Dress of Bihar

Traditional dress of Bihar

Traditionally Indian clothes are saree for women and dhoti-kurta for men. Clothes indigenous to Bihar are often in bright colours.

Women drape themselves in bright colour sarees and beautiful ornaments during special occasions. Tussar Silk sarees are most prevalent in Bihar.

Bihar Cuisine

Bihar-food-Litti-Chokha

A wholesome experience of culture is incomplete without cuisines particular to that culture or place. Bihar does not fall short in its authentic lip-smacking cuisines.

Some of the must-try delicacies of Bihar are- 

  • Litti- Chokha – This authentic cuisine of Bihar does not require a separate introduction. The famous Litti-Chokha is famous across the nation. The Litti is made with wheat and sattu with spices in a round shape. The Chokha is a concoction of mashed boiled vegetables with spices and freshly cut onions and garlic. The Litti has a crunchy crust with an aromatic smell of ghee. The taste stays along with you for long and beckons one to keep gorging on this delicious plate of food.
  • Khajuria, or Thekua – Thekua, is a ubiquitous and delicious snack of Bihar. It comprises wheat and jaggery and is deep-fried. The snack is significant for its fulfilling taste.
  • Dal Peetha – Dal Peetha is a form of dumpling authentic to Bihar. The food is made with rice flour and stuffing of lentil paste with spices and pickles. Dal Peetha is an easy and delicious food to enjoy for breakfast or a light snack.

These were some of the many authentic delicacies of Bihar. On a sweet note, there are some special preparations original in Bihar. Some of the typical sweet dishes of Bihar are-

  • Khurma and Lathko
  • Kesar Peda, and many more.

Occupation in Bihar

Occupation-in-Bihar

For a long time, agriculture has been the backbone of Bihar’s economy. Despite the fact that Bihar has a harsh topography that makes agriculture difficult at times, it has been the only means of survival. In Bihar, there are two distinct agricultural seasons: Kharif and Rabi. Rice, paddy, wheat, jute, and maize are some of the most important crops. North Bihar is known for its agricultural production. As a result, it has a primarily agricultural-related business and infrastructure.

The state boasts a significant pool of low-cost industrial labour too, making it a suitable location for a variety of businesses and industries.

Learning about the rich Bihar culture only makes people want to visit the place and explore it by themselves. Enjoying the beautiful historic architecture, trying out the tasty delicacies, and appreciating the art is all part of the wholesome Bihar experience. Bihar culture is indeed very diverse and exciting for all. For those who like to explore the history and different traditions of a place, Bihar is a place you cannot miss. I hope you get to enjoy a delicious plate of Litti-Chokha while enjoying the culture of Bihar soon.

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Bihar – Culture And Tradition

Bihar – Culture And Tradition

Bihar is located in the eastern part of India and is the third most populous state in the country and the 13th largest state in the area. The state is spread over an area of ​​695 km north of south, whereas its width from east to west is 483 km. Nepal in the north, Uttar Pradesh in the west, Jharkhand in the south, and surrounded by West Bengal in the east is a quadrilateral in the shape of Bihar.

The state enjoys a unique location-specific advantage because of its proximity to the vast markets of eastern and northern India, access to ports such as Kolkata and Haldia, and to raw material sources and mineral reserves from the neighboring states.

Bihar is one of the strongest agricultural states. Like the other states of India, about 80 percent, three-fourths of the population of the state depends on agriculture and animal husbandry, which is much higher than the national average.

Bihar Agriculture

It is the fourth-largest producer of vegetables & the eighth largest producer of fruits in India. Food processing, dairy, sugar, manufacturing, and healthcare are some of the fast-growing industries in the state. The state has planned initiatives for the development of other sectors such as education and tourism and also provides incentives for information technology and renewable energy.

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The state has a large base of cost-effective industrial labor, making it an ideal destination for a wide range of industries. Bihar is marked by considerable geographic, social-economical, and cultural diversity. It is endowed with a large part of the fertile Gangetic plains and well highlands rich in mineral deposits and forests.

Only 11.3 percent of Bihar’s population lives in cities, which is the lowest after Himachal Pradesh. Ancient Bihar was a very large center of education, power, and learning. Maurya and Gupta Dynasty ruled this area for a considerable time. In the ’70s, Bihar was far less economically and socially than other states of India. However, due to the government’s plans and industries, Bihar is on the path to development.

Also Read: Bihar the silk city of India

Bihar’s history can be traced back to the Prehistoric Period and is very ancient. The earliest history can be traced to the Hindu epic of Ramayana. Mithila was the birthplace of Lord Ram’s wife, Sita. The author of The Ramayan, Maharishi Valmiki lives in ancient Bihar.

Mahajanpada period and the rule of the Magadhan empire bring glory to ancient Bihar. Pataliputra (Patna) was the capital of ancient India’s powerful Magadha kingdom.

Bihar has experienced various invasions from different dynasties. Two of India’s most glorious dynasties, Mauryas (321 -185 BCE) and Guptas (320 to 550 CE) flourished in the ancient Bihar region which was then known as Magadh.

The Mauryan emperor, Ashoka (born c.304 BCE, died c. 232 BCE), who was born in Pataliputra (Patna) is believed to be one of the greatest rulers in the history of the world.

The Great King Ashoka of the Mauryan dynasty whose empire spread across South Asia, had his capital in Pataliputra which is present Patna. It was a prosperous center of India’s ancient civilization. Bihar has been associated with Chandragupta Maurya and Emperor Ashoka one of the greatest empires in India. There were 19 thousand Buddhist monasteries in Magadha during Emperor Ashoka.

The inscriptions of Ashok, his Dharma, and other features like the Ashoka pillar have been incorporated into the independent Republic of India. The Dharma chakra is incorporated into the national flag of India, The Indian tricolor and the figure of four lions atop a pedestal, with the inscription of a wheel, were adopted as the Official Seal of the independent Republic of India.

The great spiritual way of Buddhism originated and thrived in ancient Bihar, as Buddha attained his enlightenment in Bodhgaya. Therefore the region is full of remains of the monasteries known as Stupa. Jain leader Mahavira also belonged to this region and attained his Nirvana at Pawapuri.

In the 12th century, the invasion of Muhammad bin Khilji resulted in the Nalanda and Taxila schools destruction along with thousands of Buddhist monks.

 Nalanda university ruins

Guru Govind Singh , the tenth and last Guru of the Sikhs, was born in Patna. The Har Mandir Takht built by Maharaja Ranjit Singh to commemorate his birthplace is regarded as one of the five ‘Akal Takht’s by the Sikhs.

In medieval times, Bihar was at its peak during the reign of Sher Shah Suri who founded the city of Patna on the ancient land of Pataliputra. In the reign of the great Afghan ruler Sher Shah Suri ruled from Patna and built the Grand Trunk Road the longest road in India. Bihar saw a span of five years of good governance.

During the freedom struggle, Bihar has some greatest revolutionizers like Khudiram Bose, Prafulla Chaki, and Chandrasekhar Azad.

During British rule, Mahatma Gandhi started his first experiment of the Satyagraha movement from the Champaran region against the oppression of the indigo farmers by the Britishers. Bihar remained a part of the Bengal Presidency of British India until December 1911, when it was separated from the Bengal Presidency while Bihar and Orissa comprised a single province.

The constitution of the united Bihar and Orissa was changed to separate the state of Bihar in 1936. The present form of Bihar came into existence on 01 November 1956. In 2000, Jharkhand was made a separate state from Bihar.

  • Culture and Tradition

Bihar Culture

Bihar has a rich cultural heritage, it’s the land of Buddhism and Jainism. Bihar is known as “The Land of Buddha” where Gautam Buddha attained enlightenment at Bodh Gaya.

Bihar is a state with the culturally most mixed population. We have Hindus, Muslims, Jain, Buddhists, Sikhs, and Christians living here. Bihar has a rich cultural background to be proud of it is associated with ‘Samudra Manthan’ of the Vedic era, Sita of Rama, and Karna of Mahabharata. People are shy, honest, helping, and confident in themselves.

Suggested Read:  Culture and Tradition of Indian States

chhat puja

The people of Bihar celebrate festivals and religious events with great happiness and love. The main festival of Bihar is Chhath Puja , where the sun god is worshipped. While other festivals like Sama-Chakeva, Ramnavami, Makar-Sankranti, Bihula, Madhushravani, Teej, Pitrapaksha Mela, Sonepur fair, and Shravani Mela are celebrated with great enthusiasm.

Other festivals of the nation like Saraswati Puja, Holi, Ramzan, Bakrid, Mahashivaratri, Durga Puja, Diwali, Buddha Purnima, Christmas, and Mahavir Jayanti are celebrated too.

In Bihar major language spoken is Hindi, while Urdu and Santali are also spoken. Hindi is the official language of the state while Maithili, Bhojpuri, Angika, and Magahi are also widely spoken in the state.

Bihar Litti Chokha

The cuisines of people of Bihar are both vegetarian and non-vegetarian. Non- vegetarianism is still less due to Buddhism and Jainism beliefs, as Buddhism and Jainism promote vegetarianism. Roti, Daal, Sabji are the basic food of Biharis.

People of Bihar are fond of eating Litti Choka, some of the popular Bihari dishes are Bihari Kebab, Litti-Chokha, Bihari Boti, Bihari Chicken Masala, Sattu Paratha, Chokha, and fish curry.

Suggested Read:  Famous Food Of Indian States

chhat puja

The traditional dress of the Bihari people is dhoti-kurta for men and saree for women. The effect of western wear has affected a lot of people in Bihar and people wear western shirts and trousers. Western wear is getting popular not only among urban people but also among the rural male population.

Salwar kameez is the main dress for women of urban Bihar and women wear saree in the “Seedha Aanchal” style traditionally. Tussar Silk saree is the most used in Bihari costumes.

Suggested Read:  Traditional Dresses Of Indian States

Music and Dance

Chhau

Bihar has a lot of contributions to Indian classical music. It has produced musicians like Bharat Ratna Ustad Bismillah Khan and dhrupad singers like the Malliks and the Mishras along with poets like Vidyapati Thakur who contributed to Maithili Music. Classical music in Bihar is a form of Hindustani classical music.

Chhau dance is very popular among tribal people, Bidesia is a very popular folk dance of Bihar and is more prevalent in the Bhojpuri-speaking regions of Bihar. Jat-Jatin is popular in north Bihar, Jijya is also one of the eminent dances of Bihar.

Mithali Paintings

There are various traditional styles of painting that are popular in Bihar. Mithali Paintings, a style of Indian painting used in the Mithila region of Bihar also called Madhubani art. It was earlier done on mud walls but today they are done on cloth, handmade paper, and canvas. The painting is done with fingers, twigs, brushes, nib-pens, and match sticks using natural dye and mineral pigments.

Patna School of Painting called Patna Qalaam, Company Painting and was an offshoot of the well-known Mughal Miniature School of Painting flourished in Bihar from the early 18th to the mid-20th century. The style is famous for its soft colors and the use of handmade paper or mica sheets. Most of these paintings depict the life of the people of Bihar.

Villages of Bihar create fascinating handicrafts. Fantastic bamboo articles, leather works, statues made up of white metal, wooden toys, and baskets made from cane and bamboo are available in plenty.

Bihar is famous for Sujini embroidery, Sikki Grass work, Yampuri Puppetry, Tikuli Work, Bangle making, stonework, wood inlay, Lacquerware, Pottery works, Bamboo works, and printed textile.

Bihar’s antiquity is evident from its name, which is derived from the ancient word “VIHARA” (monastery). It is indeed a land of monasteries.

The passage of the Ganga, flowing wide and deep enrich the plains of Bihar before distributing in Bengal’s deltoid zone. There are places to visit in Buddhist, Jain, Ramayana, Sufi, Sikh, and Shiv Shakti, Bihar’s antiquity is evident from its name, abound in this ancient land where India’s first major empires rose and fell.

Among all Indian states, Bihar is the one most intimately linked to the Buddha’s life, resulting in a trail of pilgrimages that have come to be known as the Buddhist circuit.

There are places to visit for Buddhist Circuit, Jain Circuit, Ramayana Circuit, Sufi Circuit, Gandhi Circuit, Sikh Circuit, Shiv Shakti Circuit, and Eco Circuit which have many renowned places to visit. Some of the major tourist places to visit are.

Mahabodhi Temple

The holiest site for any Buddhist devotee is the Bodhi tree which stands in the middle of the Mahabodhi temple complex. About 2600 years ago Gautama Siddhartha is supposed to have realized the enlightenment at this very place under a Peepal tree known as the Mahabodhi tree.

Gaya: 80’ Buddha Statue

Buddha in Bihar

The Great Buddha Statue popularly known as the 80’ Buddha Statue was unveiled and consecrated on November 18, 1989, with a ceremony graced with the presence of His Holiness the XIV the Dalai Lama, who blessed the 25-meter statue

Vishwa Shanti Stupa

Vishwa Shanti Stupa

The magnificent white marble and concrete stupa dome rise about 125’ high that was built in 1969 at the top of the Ratnagiri hill to commemorate the Buddha. There are four golden Buddha statues around the dome. The somber sound of the enormous gong emitting from the temple behind fills the entire space with an aura of sanctity.

Nalanda University Ruin

It is the ruins of one of the oldest residential international universities which thrived from around the 5th or 6th century CE till the 13th century.

Golhar Patna

This is a massive granary Gol Ghar is situated next to the river Ganga. It was built by Captain John Garstin for the British army in 1786 to take a precaution against the severe famine that occurred in 1770.

Maner Sharif

The state museum of Bihar is an important place not to be left out of the itinerary of anybody visiting the State Capital. Located at the heart of the city it boasts of the innumerable heritage collections found in the region replete with inglorious historical settings

Barabar Caves

The seven caves (Satgarva) were created in Mauryan emperor Ashoka’s time for the Ajeevikas (Buddhist monks).

Kesaria Stupa

The excavation in 1998 by the ASI unearthed this massive stupa that is claimed to be the world’s tallest excavated stupa at 104’ height having a circumference width of 1400’.

Suggested Read:  Formation Dates of Indian States

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Culture of Bihar- Language, literature, Folk songs, Artforms, Fairs and Festivals

Culture of Bihar

Bihar is a large state of India covering approximately 94,163 square kilometres. The Culture of Bihar , language, customs, and traditions change from region to region. But, the people have embraced the customs and traditions of each other and celebrate each other’s festivals and beliefs and together live in harmony.

Language and literature of Bihar

The main language spoken in Bihar is Hindi. It is spoken by approximately 80.9 per cent of the population. Urdu and Santhali are other prominent languages used by the people. Different Indian languages can be traced back to different ethnic groups of India and have evolved from different stocks of population. Broadly speaking we can differentiate the Indian languages into the following groups:

  • Indo- Aryan
  • Sino- Tibetan

In major languages of India comprise the two dominant groups the Dravidians and the Indo- Aryans. The language used in Bihar belongs to the Indo- European family of languages that came to India with the advent of the Aryans. Bihari language is made up of all the main languages of western and Northern India. It is a mix of Bengali, Marathi, Punjabi, Hindi, Gujarati, Oriya, Kashmiri, Sanskrit, Urdu, Pahari, Sindhi, and others. 

If divided on the basis of language and culture Bihar can be attributed to four Regional identities:

  • The tribal languages

The region of Bihar where Magadhi is spoken is the Magadh Pradesh of ancient times and today consists of approximately the district of Patna and the North half of the District of Gaya. Although the Magadhi language is also used in Aurangabad, Munger, Nalanda, Narada, Girdih, Dhanbad, Hazaribagh, Palamau (North-Eastern), the purest form of the language is to be found in the districts of Gaya and Patna. Hence, they can be considered as the core of the language.

As the name suggests, Bhojpuri is the language of Bhojpuri which is the name of the town of a district in Shahabad. The districts where Bhojpuri is spoken today are Bhojpur, Chapra, Siwan, Molinari, Palamu, Rohtas, Gopalganj, Champaran, Hazaribagh, Western Vaishali, and Muzaffarpur. Bhojpuri is the folk language of the rural people and the folk tales and songs in Bhojpuri come across as the mirror of the religious, socio-cultural and political aspects of the Bhojpuri people. Bhojpuri was always influenced by Brij Bhasha. Bhakti literature then was written in the Bhojpuri language. This continued but after the 19th century, not much attention was paid towards cultivating this language.

Literature of Bihar

Since ancient times, Bihar has been a land of education, culture, and scientific events. The Mauryan period was an important seat of learning and scholars from all over the world came seeking knowledge to the great Nalanda University. Great personalities like Lord Buddha, Lord Mahavira, Guru Gobind Singh (the last Guru of the Sikhs), Aryabhatta (the great Mathematician) (476 to 550 AD) all lived on this land. Nalanda was the world’s first seat of higher learning and was sought after by scholars of the nations world over. It remained thus from the 5th to the 11th century Before its decline began. Lord Buddha had taught in this university and the Chinese traveller Hieun Tsang was a student here. A number of great writers and scholars have flourished in Bihar and made important contributions to the literature of Bihar. Some great poets and Authors of Bihar are:

  • Mahamahopadhyaya Pandit Ram Avtar Sharma
  • R. K. Sinha
  • Shivpujan Sahai
  • Ramdhari Rambriksh Banipuri
  • Pandit Nalin Vilochan Sharma
  • Mridula Sinha
  • Ramdhari Singh Dinkar
  • Jhaand Baba Nagarjun
  • Maha Pandit Rahul Sankrityayan.

Folk dances of Bihar

Bihar is a state rich in its folk art songs and dances. Various forms of folk dances are prevalent in different regions of Bihar. 

  • Bidesia- it is a folk dance form popular in the Bhojpuri speaking regions of Bihar. The Bidesia dance form is accompanied by the Biraha folk songs of Bihar. The Biraha songs demote the pain, sorrow, and anguish of the woman left behind by her lover for various reasons. It is said that Bihari Thakur started the concept of Bidesia dance form through which he raised the conflicting themes of upper caste and lower caste discrepancy, the rift between the rich and poor classes, and other such issues.
  • Jhijhia- It is a very popular dance form of Bihar. Also known as Jijiya, it is an all-women dance in which women depict their adoration for Lord Indra and give offerings to please him. The dance is performed when there is a situation of draught. When the land is parched and cracked and there is no hope for rain, the village women dress up in all their finery and sing and dance to please the rain god, appealing for rain and harmony. This is a ritualistic dance.
  • Phagua- Holi, the festival of colours is celebrated all over the country. In Bihar, the celebrations are accompanied by the phagua folk songs, accompanied with dholak, jhal-manjira, harmonium, and other instruments. The phauga dance along with the song tells the story of Bhakt Prahlad and his demon father Hiranya Kashipu and also of Prahlas’s aunt Holika.
  • Jhumri Dance- Jhumri is popular in the Mithila Region. It is performed by married women and is somewhat similar to the Garba dance of Gujarat. It celebrates the romantic seasons of the months of Ashwin and Kartik when nature is at its attractive best. Jhumri is a seasonal dance that celebrates the joy of the season.
  • Jat-Jatin Dance- this dance belong to the Mithila Kosi region of North Bihar. Originally it was based on the story of the separation of two lovers  Jat and Jatin, but, evolved over time and now raises social issues like floods, poverty, drought, and others.
  • Kajri- The humming and singing of Kajri songs start with the advent of Shravan (monsoon). As the raindrops fall the Kajri dancers dance in tune with the musical notes of the Kajri songs. This folk song and dance celebrates the month of monsoon.
  • Sohar Khilona Dance- it is a ceremonial dance to celebrate the birth of a child in the family. This occasion is celebrated throughout the country with different traditional rituals. In Bihar, ladies sing Sohar songs praising and comparing the child with Lord Rama, Lord Krishna, and other Gods. The dancers dancing to the Sohar wear masks.
  • Paola Dance- this dance is more of a martial art performance. It is performed with a sword and shield and incites the viewers to work for a better physique and indulge in courageous activities.

Folk songs of Bihar

In Bihar, folk songs have so deeply impacted the lives of the people that it is still alive. The credit for preserving it to date goes to devotees who sing the Bhajans and Kirtana, the woman folk of Bihar, and the villagers. It was in the 11th century that Nanya Deva of Mithila (1097 – 1133) who was a great patron of music developed popular ragas which are continuing till today. This Mithila music was carried to Bengal, Uttar Pradesh, and Nepal. Later, during the Muslim period, the art form of music and dance were suppressed but survived. Some of the Ragas which originated in Bihar are:

  • Lagani, and others

These forms celebrated the seasons, the emotions, and the religious tags invoke Gods and Goddesses.

The folk dance and songs of Bihar are also preserved by the perseverance of the devotees, the Nagar shobhinis, and the Nagar vadhus of the older times. The common people too adopted the song and dance forms for their entertainment and to sing praises of the Gods. This, preserving the else art forms. The singing of religious songs like Bhajan Kirtan is very common throughout Bihar.  Kajri, Chaita, Birha and Basant songs are seasonal ragas. Jatasari, sohar, and jhumar are traditional entertainment songs. Ramleela nautanki and bhikariya songs can be heard at festivals and fairs. 

Art forms of Bihar

Madhubani painting is the most well known and celebrated art form of Bihar. Since it originates from the Mithila Region of Bihar, it is also known as Mithila paintings. The colours used in this are natural dyes and mineral pigments. Different paintings are meant for different occasions and festivals. The natural dyes are filled in the drawings with brushes, fingers, twigs, and matchsticks. Traditionally the paintings were made on freshly plastered mud walls. But, now cloth, handmade paper, canvas, and other backgrounds are used for these paintings. Madhubani paintings are based on natural objects like- sun, moon, rivers, flora and fauna, dirties, mythological scenes, and man’s association with nature.

Sujini Embroidery:

Sujini Embroidery is an art form in which old, used, and worn-out clothes are given a new lease of life. Several worn-out sarees and dhotis folded on top of each other are put together in a close running stitch in colourful threads. Women often stitch in some narratives in these stitches.

Applique Kathwa Patchwork:

Kathwa Patchwork comprises pieces of patchwork sewn onto a larger piece of cloth. The edges of the patchwork are stitched onto the fabric. This applique work is mainly used to make table covers, curtains, cushions, canopies, and tents. The designs used are from nature, like trees, birds, animals, flowers, and others.

Sikki Grass work:

Sikki is obtained from an annual plant that grows during the monsoon. After the plant dries, the flowering part of the plant is cut off and the bottom is stored to make attractive sikki articles from it. The dried Grass is dyed in different colours and a variety of articles like baskets, boxes, toys, etc., are prepared. 

Tikuli work:

It is an art form made from broken glass. The artisans melt the broken glass and give it different shapes and designs. 

Bangle Making:

The best Bangle Making region in Bihar is Muzaffarpur. The artisans get their raw material from the nearby forests. The bangles are given a circular shape by using light fire. 

Yampuri Puppetry:

Yampuri is the name given to the traditional rod Puppetry of Bihar. Wooden puppets which are made in one piece and have no joints are held and manoeuvred by rods from below. Shows of Yampuri puppets are also called Baikunth Darshan shows.

Stonework: 

During the Mauryan period, stone and architecture work were at their peak. But, today it is contained in pathar katti in the Gaya district. Since blue-black pot stone is easily available here, household articles, statues, etc., are made by artisans. Very fine fountains and tables in stone are also made. 

Wood inlay:

The wood inlay is an ancient industry in Bihar. Today it is done with materials like ivory, mental, and staghorn.

Lacquer work, printed textiles, leathercraft, papier-mâché, pottery works, bamboo art are other forms of handicraft. 

Fairs and Festivals of Bihar:

Bihar is a state well known for its various fairs and festivals.

Sonpur Cattle Fair

The Sonpur cattle fair held yearly at Sonpur is a vast land of teeming humanity, cattle, horses, buffaloes, elephants, and others. It is also known as the Harihar Kshetra Mela. The fair commences on Kartik Purnima and lasts for 15 days. 

Makar Sankranti Mela

This is another famous Melanie held in Rajgir in the month of Posh (mid-January). Devotees worship the ditties at hot springs. Another makar Sankranti Mela is held in the Mandar hills in the Banka district of the state. The significance of this place is that the Mandar Hill shows the markings of servant coil around it. It is believed that the hill was used during Sagarmanthan (churning of the ocean) to attain Amrit (nectar).

Pitrapaksh Mela

During the Pitrapaksha ritual in September/ October, Gaya town witnesses the famous Pitrapaksha mela or the Ancestor worship. The descendent of Magga Brahmins (once devotees of Shiva), later converted to Vaishnavism help the pilgrims with the vehicle shrad cerekknynor the pind Dan. This ritual is for the departed soul to attain salvation. 

Vishjupada Temple Mela

The Vishnupada temple was built in 1787 by Rani Aahiliya Bai of Indore. The shrad ceremony is performed under a fig tree near the temple. The women perform the rituals indoors. 

Shravani Mela

Shravani Mela is held in the month of Shravan. It covers the 108-kilometre route linking Sultanganj (Bihar) and Deoghar in Jharkhand. Lakhs of Kawarias (pilgrims) wearing the saffron collect water from river Ganga at Sultanganj and walk barefoot to the temple situated at Deoghar. They bathe the Shivlinga at the Deoghar temple as an offering. Thousands of people throng alongside the route. The government and many institutions, charitable trusts, and individuals offer service along the route for the Kawarias to cover the pilgrimage safely and with ease. 

Saurath sabha

An annual gathering at the Saurath village of Madhubani district of Bihar. Held in the month of June, it is a gathering of Mathil (Mithila Brahmins). Known as Saurath sabha, it is held in an enormous mango Grove. Parents and guardians of children of marriageable age come to this sabha with the horoscopes and find suitable matches for their wards. 

Rajgir Mahotsav

It is held every year during the last week of December in the hilly Rajgir region. The Mahotsav consists of vibrant and excellent folk art, besides classical and cultural live performances by renowned artists from all over the country. 

Madhu shravani.

It is a festival celebrated in the month of Shravan (July – August). It is a festival of the Mithila Pradesh. Newly married women perform the rituals. Snake worship is performed at this festival.

Sama Chakeva

This festival too is popular in Mithila. It celebrated the deep relationship between brother and sister. Also, heralds the beginning of the migration of birds from the Himalayas to the plains. 

On the auspicious birthday of Rama, this festival is celebrated with joy and reverence in Bihar. Many devotees keep fast for seven days. An atmosphere of celebration and gaiety prevails. The temples dedicated to Lord Rama are decorated, special prayers are held, and offerings are made.

Buddha Jayanti

Gaya witnesses the holy gathering of Buddhist pilgrims on the occasion of Buddha Jayanti. It is an international Buddhist gathering held annually in the month of Vaisak (April/ May). The annual session of the Dalai Lama also is held in December. 

Mahavir Jayanti

It is celebrated in the Parasnath hill at Vaishali. Deo deep-water is celebrated at Pawapuri. It is celebrated 10 days after Diwali. It marks the occasion of attainment Nirvana by Mahavir. 

In this article, we have discussed the culture of Bihar, about its rich heritage and harmonious co-existence of its people. We hope this article will help you with your purpose.

FAQs: Frequently Asked Questions: 

s: What are the main languages used in Bihar? Answer: The main language spoken in Bihar is Hindi. It is spoken by approximately 80.9 per cent of the population. Urdu and Santhali are other prominent languages used by the people. Different Indian languages can be traced back to different ethnic groups of India and have evolved from different stocks of population. Broadly speaking we can differentiate the Indian languages into the following groups: •    Indo- Aryan •    Sino- Tibetan •    Dravidian •    Austric •    Negroid

Some of the Ragas which originated in Bihar are: •    Nachari •    Phaag •    Chaita •    Purbi •    Lagani,  •    Negroid

Some great poets and Authors of Bihar are: •    Mahamahopadhyaya Pandit Ram Avtar Sharma •    R. K. Sinha •    Shivpujan Sahai •    Ramdhari Rambriksh Banipuri •    Pandit Nalin Vilochan Sharma •    Mridula Sinha •    Pankaj Raj •    Ramdhari Singh Dinkar •    Jhaand Baba Nagarjun •    Maha Pandit Rahul Sankrityayan.

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Culture of Bihar (Custom, Traditions, and Lifestyle)

BIHAR CULTURE & TRADITION

3 years ago

1. Heritage of Bihar

Bihar is famous for its history and it dates back to three millennia, originating from the Indo-Aryan ethnic group. Most of the monuments in Bihar have great historic relations and tell the history of Hinduism, Jainism, and Buddhism. Bodhi tree inside Mahabodhi temple under which Buddha attained his enlightenment and gave rise to Buddhism, the University of Nalanda was founded by Gupta Dynasty and was known as Nalanda Vishwa Vidyalaya, its library was the world’s biggest library at that time with all the facilities and it has every type of books, but the king of Turkey Bakhtiyar Khalji destroyed the university, the university was set on fire. Earlier Patna was known as Patliputra, it was very powerful due to its religious thoughts and wealth. The historical importance of Bihar one must explore. 

2. Art of Bihar

The art and craft of Bihar are quite famous. In the Mithila region of Bihar Mithila painting is famous, the painting is carried out from generation to generation mainly by women. Mithila painting was mostly done on freshly plastered mud huts. The painting is famous for its other name Madhubani Art.

essay on culture and tradition of bihar

3. Music and Dance Forms of Bihar

Bihar has contributed a lot to Indian classical music. Bhikhari Thakur a famous poet, also known as Shakespeare of Bhojpuri, Bharat Ratna Ustad Bismillah Khan famous ‘Shenai Vaadak’, Draupadi singers Mishras and Mallik’s are some great musicians of Bihar. There are many folk songs in Bihar which are mostly related to the life of ordinary people, some of them are ‘Sohar’- performed during childbirth, ‘Ropnigeet’- performed during sowing paddy season, ‘Katnigeet’- performed during paddy harvesting season, ‘Sumangali’- performed during the wedding, and many more all these are performed by ladies. The folk music of Bihar is very unique there is a song (geet) for every event.

essay on culture and tradition of bihar

Bihar has various dance forms Mithila folk dance, folk dance of Adivasis, and Chau dance of Seraikella. Mithila dance form is based on various themes such as Ram-Leela Nach, Bhagat Nach, Narada Nach, Kunjvawt Nach, Arti Nach, and many more, all the dances are related to Hindu religion. In the Seraikella Kharsawam region of Bihar, Chau dance which was performed earlier to practice the fighting techniques, the performer wears a mask during the dance which was believed to conceal the identity of the performer in ancient days. Tribal folk dance poses some specific purpose, and they show their love towards nature from their dance art. Some main festivals of Santhals (tribal of Bihar) are Ba Parva, Dasia Parva, Maghi Parva, and Karma. Paika, Jatra, Karma, and Jadur are some major dance festivals of Oraons and the Mundas.  

4. Languages of Bihar

In Bihar, Hindi is used all over the state with its unique Bihari accent. We can see people speaking Bihari languages in several other states like UP, Jharkhand, West Bengal and some parts of Nepal also. The most spoken regional language in Bihar is Maithili along with dialects of Bajjika and Angika in over 20 districts of Bihar. The second language which is most used in Bihar in approximately 10 districts is Magahi.

5. Customs, Religions, and Traditions in Bihar

 Bihar is a state rich in heritage and monuments. Many of the tourists from all over the world travel to Bihar, to be a part of many customs and ceremonies. The state is known for its heritage site of Buddhism and Jainism followers. Lord Gautam Buddha attained enlightenment at Bodh Gaya. People of Bihar celebrate many festivals to give tribute to their God.

There is not any specific religion living in the state. The people of Bihar are a mixture of many religious groups, who live together and follow their customs and ceremonies. The state’s population is the combination of Hindus, Muslims, Jainism, Buddhism, and Christians. People of Bihar help each other in their ceremonies and festivals which makes the state strengthen their equality.

The tradition of Bihar is very unique from many other states. Traditionally men in Bihar use to wear Dhoti – Kurta. But nowadays western dressing came into trend, many people now follow western dress like shirts and trousers even in the urban setting of Bihar. Women wear Salwar kameez as it was one of the traditional dresses of Bihar. Festivals like Chhath Puja have a very emotional connection with the people of Bihar.

6. Bihar Culture Dress

The most preferable and traditional dress in Bihar is dhoti-kurta for men and saree for women. The clothing style in Bihar is the mirror of its culture and tradition. Western culture is also affecting the lifestyle of people and we can see men wearing shirts, trousers, jeans, and other western dresses and women wearing salwar kameez in urban as well as rural Bihar. Youngsters prefer western dresses as they look modern but elderly people still prefer a dhoti or lungi and on top, they usually go for shirts, t-shirts, and kurtas which show us the true amalgamation of east meets west. Bihar is famous for its handwoven textiles. One of the unique and individualistic dress styles for women in Bihar is Tussar Silk saree which is considered as the most sensual attire of and an Indian woman. Women usually drape their saree in “seedha anchal style”. We can see some different dressing sense of people in different regions of Bihar. For example, Paag which is a unique part of the dress in Mithila is a turban worn by men to symbolize the status in Bihari society. On special occasions like weddings, people do wear modern western dresses like suits but most of the people still prefer traditional Sherwani or Kurtas which looks more elegant and perfect for these types of traditional occasions.

7. Bihar Culture Food

Bihari cuisine includes three types of cuisine showing different varieties and traditions of the culture in the state itself which are Bhojpuri cuisine, Maithil cuisine, and Magahi cuisine. The first thing which comes to our mind by thinking about Bihari food is the famous Litti Chokha. Seasonal fruits like watermelon and beverages like sharbat made from wood-apple fruit are very common among people. Numerous meat dishes are famous in Bihar for its a unique taste and cultural touch in taste and spices. Chicken and Mutton are the most common in Bihar and Fish are famous in North Bihar due to many rivers present there. Some cities are famous for its special food like Champaran is famous for meat, a small city names Pakribarawan is famous for a sweet dish called Vara mithai, Sitamarhi is famous for Balushahi and so on. These dishes can be only found in Bihar and are rich in taste and culture.

essay on culture and tradition of bihar

8. Bihar Work Culture

Bihar is one of the populous states in our country and still provides ample opportunities and work for every people. Most of the people here are businessmen who are expanding their business and living a happy life. In Bihar, there is a huge craze for Government Jobs and that is why Bihar gives the highest number of civil services officers. The people of Bihar are hardworking and they are present everywhere in our country as well as outside our country. Here, non-privileged people also work hard all day and fulfill the needs of their families through their hard-earned money. There are several break mineral mines in Bihar which also give many job offers to people. Here, people of every class are involved in farming and is one of the states that provides enough crops of need. Farming is the main occupation for almost all people living in rural areas.  

9. Bihar Festivals

The most famous festival of Bihar is Chatth which is celebrated twice a year. Apart from this, there are several famous regional and national festivals celebrated in Bihar’s different cultures and traditions. Festivals like Diwali, Holi, Eid, and Navratri are celebrated as well as some festivals are celebrated only by the people of this state. Some of them are Sama Chakewa which is celebrated to dedicate the relationship of brother and sister in the Mithila region, Jiutiya is celebrated by women for wellbeing and long life of their sons, Newan or Newani where during the crop cutting season people take new grain to home and eat it with certain ceremonies, karma which is celebrated by tribal and non-tribal people of Bihar relating to crops and so on. Every festival mentioned here is of its important significance and shows the rich culture and diversity of Bihar.

essay on culture and tradition of bihar

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essay on culture and tradition of bihar

Welcome to the enchanting realm of Bihar, an eastern Indian state that beckons with a treasury of ancient cultural wonders. Let us embark on a whimsical odyssey through this mystical land, where history dances hand in hand with tradition. From resplendent festivals that ignite the senses to melodies that echo through time and bewitching movements that bring stories to life, the cultural heritage of Bihar reveals India's soul in its purest form. In this ethereal chronicle, we shall embark on a quest to uncover the concealed gems of Bihar's transcendent legacy. Join us as we venture forth, guided by the whispers of the past, on a journey that promises enchantment at every turn.

Celebrate Diversity and Embrace Tradition with Culture of Bihar

Bihar's culture is a vibrant mosaic of traditions, art forms, and religious practices. With captivating folk dances like Jhumar and Jat-Jatin, and historical gems like Nalanda, Bihar proudly displays its rich heritage and enduring cultural values.

  • Bihari Festivals and Traditions: Embracing The Cultural Legacy
  • Cultural Heritage of Bihar: Embarking on a Cultural Odyssey
  • Folk Music and Dance of Bihar: Resonating the Mesmerising Movements
  • Cuisine of Bihar: Savouring Cultural Delights
  • Famous Historical Sites in Bihar: Unveiling the Tapestry of History
  • Bihari Art and Crafts: Celebrating the Masterpieces

1. Bihari Festivals and Traditions: Embracing The Cultural Leg

In the heartland of the state, where time dances to the rhythm of eternal traditions, a symphony of vibrant Bihari festivals and traditions adorns the cultural tapestry. Amidst this kaleidoscope of enchantment, one festival reigns supreme: Chhath Puja, a celestial voyage dedicated to the sun god. Over four celestial days, devotees converge upon the river's edge, their souls aflame with devotion. Fasting and sacred ablutions intertwine while earthen lamps illuminate the night, crafting a breathtaking tableau of unwavering faith.

But wait, for the festival fiesta does not cease there. Behold the grandeur of Sonepur Mela, a dazzling spectacle that transcends borders, drawing throngs of wanderers to its ancient grounds. Within the town of Sonepur, a treasure trove of whimsy unfolds. Asia's mighty cattle fair takes centre stage, where a grand carnival of trade mesmerises all who behold. Majestic elephants, noble horses, and bovine beauties grace the scene, exchanging hands amidst a symphony of colours. Yet, it is not only the livestock that enthrals the senses. Local handicrafts entice with their rustic allure, traditional performances take flight, and cultural spectacles unfold, ensuring that this celebration of Bihar's rustic heritage bursts with life and vitality.

2. Cultural Heritage of Bihar: Embarking on a Cultural Odyssey

Step into Bihar, a realm pulsating with vibrant festivals and time-honoured traditions deeply ingrained in the very fabric of its being. Amongst these, Chhath Puja stands tall—an awe-inspiring four-day devotion to the sun god. Devotees gather on the riverbank, immersing themselves in rigorous fasting, sacred bathing, and the illuminating dance of earthen lamps, igniting a spectacle of devotion and unwavering faith.

Another star in Bihar's cultural constellation is the world-renowned Sonepur Mela. Nestled in Sonepur, this grand fair has gained fame as one of Asia's largest cattle fairs. Visitors from far and wide flock to witness the vibrant trade of majestic elephants, graceful horses, and prised cattle. The fair becomes a melting pot of local craftsmanship, traditional performances, and a medley of Bihari festivals and traditions, painting a vivid picture of Bihar's rural heritage.

Also Read About More :  Dishes of Bihar that are Packed with Great Taste and High Nutrition

3. Folk Music and Dance of Bihar: Resonating the Mesmerising Movements

Prepare to be serenaded by the lyrical framework of folk music and dance of Bihar passed down through generations. Here, the melodious strains of Maithili folk songs, known as "Maithili geet," will sweep you away on a lyrical journey of poetic storytelling and soul-stirring melodies. These songs effortlessly blend themes of love, nature, and social issues, crafting a magnificent fusion of emotion and artistic expression.

Meanwhile, the rustic charm of Bhojpuri music has traversed Bihar's borders, captivating not only its own people but also enthusiasts across India and worldwide. Its distinctive allure transports listeners to the very heart of Bihar, evoking a sense of belonging and warmth.

But the journey doesn't end with music. Bihar's cultural landscape is embellished with a myriad of traditional dance forms. Witness the vivacious and energetic Jhumar dance, a spirited performance by the Munda tribe that unites synchronised movements with vibrant costumes, breathing life into the essence of Bihar's rural spirit. And then there is the graceful Jat-Jatin dance, a martial art form that embodies the agile elegance of the Kayastha community.

4. Cuisine of Bihar: Savouring Cultural Delights

Indulge your senses in the delectable flavours that the cuisine of Bihar offers, a true reflection of its cultural heritage. Let your taste buds dance to the tune of "Litti Chokha," a traditional dish that tantalises with roasted wheat balls (litti) paired with a zesty potato and brinjal mash (chokha). This rustic delicacy, served with a generous dollop of ghee, holds a special place in the hearts of Biharis and is sure to win yours too.

Another culinary gem awaiting your exploration is the flavourful "Sattu Paratha." Sink your teeth into this delightful flatbread with roasted gram flour (sattu) blended with aromatic herbs and spices. Accompanied by pickles and curd, this dish is a beloved favourite among locals and visitors alike.

No culinary journey through Bihar would be complete without a taste of the region's sweet treasures. Succumb to the crispy layers of "Khaja," a pastry crafted with finesse from flour, ghee, and delicate sugar syrup. And let the deep-fried delight of "Anarsa," made with rice flour and jaggery, melt in your mouth, leaving behind a lingering sweetness. These divine treats are cherished and savoured during festivals and joyous occasions, enriching the cultural celebrations of Bihar.

5. Famous Historical Sites in Bihar: Unveiling the Tapestry of History

Famous historical sites in Bihar are testaments to its glorious past that inspire awe. Explore the ancient city of Nalanda, once a beacon of learning in ancient India. The ruins of Nalanda University stand as a testament to Bihar's intellectual heritage, drawing scholars, historians, and wanderers from across the globe to its hallowed grounds.

Pay homage to the Mahabodhi Temple in Bodh Gaya, a UNESCO World Heritage Site that cradles the sacred spot where Gautama Buddha attained enlightenment beneath the sheltering branches of the Bodhi tree. Immerse yourself in the tranquil ambience of the temple complex, adorned with intricate architecture, a pilgrimage site revered by Buddhists and a spiritual sanctuary cherished by people of all faiths.

In the vicinity, the remnants of Vikramshila University near Bhagalpur whisper stories of Bihar's intellectual and academic might during the illustrious Pala dynasty. These ruins offer a glimpse into a bygone era when Bihar's intellectual prowess flourished.

6. Bihari Art and Crafts: Celebrating the Masterpieces

Bihari art and crafts weave a tale of skilled craftsmanship and mesmerising beauty, each region boasting its own unique style and technique. The famed Madhubani painting, also known as the Mithila, originated in Bihar's Mithila region. These intricate works of art, adorned with bold lines and vibrant hues, depict captivating mythological tales and the wonders of nature.

The delicate art of Sikki, created using finely woven golden grass, showcases Bihar's craftsmanship in creating exquisite objects like baskets, mats, and wall hangings. It is a testament to the artisans' mastery of their trade, their skilled hands breathing life into every creation. Bihar's reputation for silk weaving shines brightly, with Bhagalpuri silk emerging as one of the most coveted varieties. The exquisite silk sarees and fabrics produced in Bhagalpur are renowned for their unparalleled quality and intricate designs, making them a beloved choice for fashion connoisseurs seeking a touch of elegance.

I know you can’t wait to experience an extraordinary journey to Bihar. So Plan your trip today and prepare to be enchanted by the wonders that await you.

Choosing Adotrip as your travel partner for a vacation in Bihar is a brilliant idea. With their extensive knowledge, expert guidance, and tailored itineraries, Adotrip ensures a pleasant and hassle-free experience. Explore Bihar's rich culture, historical landmarks, and hidden gems with confidence, knowing you're in capable hands.

Also Read About More :  Places to Visit in Bihar

Q1. What are the major cultural festivals celebrated in Bihar? A1. The major cultural festivals celebrated in Bihar include Chhath Puja, Sonepur Mela, Makar Sankranti, Holi, Diwali, and Eid.

Q2. Can you tell me about the traditional dance forms and music genres of Bihar? A2. Bihar has several traditional dance forms, such as Jat-Jatin, Jhijhian, Jumari, and Paika. Music genres like Sohar, Bidesia, and Dadra are also popular in the region.

Q3. How does Bihar celebrate its regional and religious festivals? A3. Bihar celebrates its regional and religious festivals with great enthusiasm. People decorate their houses, visit temples and mosques, organise processions, perform rituals, and indulge in feasts and cultural performances.

Q4. Are there any unique art and craft forms that represent Bihar's culture? A4. Bihar is known for its unique art and craft forms, such as Madhubani painting, Manjusha art, Sujni embroidery, Sikki grass craft, and stone carving. These crafts represent Bihar's rich cultural heritage.

Q5. What are some famous historical sites and architectural wonders in Bihar? A5. Some famous historical sites and architectural wonders in Bihar are the ancient ruins of Nalanda University, Mahabodhi Temple in Bodh Gaya, Vikramshila Mahavihara, and Patna Sahib Gurudwara.

Q6. How does Bihar's cuisine reflect its cultural identity? A6. Bihar's cuisine reflects its cultural identity through dishes like litti-chokha, sattu paratha, khaja, thekua, and makhana kheer. These traditional delicacies are an integral part of Bihar's culinary heritage.

Q7. Can you tell me about the traditional attire and jewellery worn in Bihar? A7. The traditional attire in Bihar includes a dhoti-kurta for men and a saree or salwar-kameez for women. As for jewellery, women wear items like Mangal sutra, nose rings, bangles, and anklets.

Q8. Are there any specific rituals or customs followed in Bihar's cultural practices? A8. Bihar has various rituals and customs associated with its cultural practices. For example, Chhath Puja involves rigorous fasting, offering prayers to the Sun God, and dipping in rivers or ponds.

Q9. How does Bihar's cultural heritage contribute to its social fabric? A9. Bihar's cultural heritage plays a significant role in shaping its social fabric. It promotes unity, fosters a sense of belonging, and provides a platform for people to come together and celebrate their shared traditions and values.

Q10. Can you recommend some cultural events or festivals to experience in Bihar? A10. Some cultural events and festivals worth experiencing in Bihar are the Sonepur Mela, Chhath Puja, Madhubani Art Exhibition, Bihar Diwas, and the Sankat Mochan Music Festival.

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essay on culture and tradition of bihar

A Glimpse Into The Rich Culture & Traditions Of Bihar

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When you make your way to the capital city of Patna, you’re welcomed by towering monuments that bring religions together. There are people from all walks of life who give you a glimpse into the lifestyle of Bihar, and food that wins you over with the first bite itself. This is Bihar for you, a state dipped in traditions and entailing a rich history.

So, before you head over to the cultural and tradition-filled state, we would love to give a pre-hands glance at what Bihar actually looks like. This article will ensure that you get to know the true essence of Bihar.

A thousand years ago, Indo-Aryans were the first ones to settle in Bihar. With their arrival came the rich architecture and craftsmanship, the beauty of which is still reflected in Bihar’s monuments. Historian legend says that even Buddha attained enlightenment and founded Buddhism under the Bodhi tree in the Mahabodhi temple and this is how it spread rapidly in the state.

Another interesting history associated with Bihar is the Nalanda University which was founded by the Guptas and was called Nalanda Vishwa Vidyalaya. The university’s library was the most extensive in the world with all the facilities and had every type of book. The king of Turkey, Bakhtiyar Khalji, destroyed the university by setting it on fire.

Patna, the capital of Bihar was initially known as Patliputra because of its wealth and religious beliefs. Bihar’s rich culture and tradition can be discovered by exploring its historical significance.

Culture of Bihar

The culture of Bihar comprises several religions as it is believed that Buddhism, Jainism, and Sufism had all begun from here. In fact, there are several pilgrimage sights for the Sikhs as well. To know more about the culture and tradition, we have further explained the festivals, language, cuisine and a lot more.

Cultural Tours in Bihar 

1. buddhist circuit tour, bihar.

Experience a spiritual journey on the Buddhist Circuit Trail in Bihar. The origins of Buddhism in Bihar have always attracted tourists worldwide, making it one of the most visited religions worldwide. This tour is for 5 days & 4 nights. Starting from Bodhgaya, this tour will include places like Rajgir, Nalanda, Vaishali and will end at Patna.

essay on culture and tradition of bihar

2. Sikh Circuit, Bihar

Sikh Circuit tour of Bihar takes visitors to several gurudwaras and Sikh shrines featuring events from Guru Gobind Singh’s life. This tour is for 2 days and 1 night and will start at Takht Sri Harmandir Ji Sahib and include other prominent gurudwaras such as Gurdwara Guru ka Bagh and end at Gurdwara Handi Sahib.

essay on culture and tradition of bihar

3. Sufi Circuit, Bihar

Many Sufi saints were drawn to Pataliputra (Patna) during the medieval period because of its spiritual aura. As a result of the humanistic teachings of these saints, the region became a pilgrimage hub for believers of Sufism and the tour gives you more depth about the religious practices. This tour is for 6 days and 5 nights and will begin at Patna and will cover Khankayi Mujeebia, Maner Sharif, Amjhar Sharif, Sasaram and end at Patna.

essay on culture and tradition of bihar

4. Jain Circuit, Bihar

Visit some of the Jain pilgrimages in Bihar that offer a glimpse into Lord Mahavira’s life and journey. Take this tour and learn more about Jainism. This tour is for 9 days and 8 nights and will cover Vaishali, Rajgir, Pawapuri, Madhubani, and a lot more.

essay on culture and tradition of bihar

5. Ramayan Circuit, Bihar

It’s no secret that Bihar is a land rich in stories from sage Valmiki Muni’s epic Ramayana. There are several places associated with different events in Goddess Sita’s life and Lord Rama’s life. Bihar played a significant role in establishing Hinduism as a religion throughout history, so if this excites you, then this trip should be your next one. This tour is a 7 days and 6 nights tour and will cover Bagaha, Valmiki Nagar, Sitamarhi, Kako, and ends at Gaya.

essay on culture and tradition of bihar

6. Meditation Tour, Bodhgaya

Bodhgaya has become an essential Buddhist pilgrimage, yoga, and contemplation center. “Yoga” and “Reflection” have emerged as the most prevalent methods to cure Physical, Mental and Emotional Illnesses. So head to Bodhgaya if you want some solace from your daily hustle-filled life then you definitely need to book this. This is a 5 days and 4 nights tour and will cover Bodhgaya and Nalanda.

essay on culture and tradition of bihar

Cultural Experiences of Bihar

Alongside rich religious monuments and shrines, Bihar has its own unique festivals, traditions, and arts as well. From the cultural celebration of Chhath Puja to the art of Madhubani and distinctive food dishes, the peoples of Bihar follow a colorful lifestyle that every traveler must explore on their visit to this state.

1. Festivals of Bihar

Since Bihar is a land rich in culture and tradition and home to religions like Buddhism and Jainism, many festivals and celebrations take part in the state. Inherently, these festivals are connected to the lifestyle and culture of the people of Bihar. The most prominent festivals are Holi, Saraswati Puja, Durga Puja, Diwali, and Bhaiya Dooj. Besides these festivals recognized throughout India, ‘Chhath’ is explicitly celebrated in Bihar among Hindus.

The Chhath festival , which is celebrated full of zeal, is dedicated to the Sun God and Chhathi goddess. It begins on Kartik Shukla Paksha (the second fortnight of Kartik). Depending on the year, this occurs between late October and mid-November. Among Bihari people, this festival is celebrated with much pomp and devotion and the celebration extends up to four days.

essay on culture and tradition of bihar

Holi is another prominent festival of Bihar. Song lyrics for the festival commonly referred to as Phagua, are rhythmic and melodic in the state. An excellent piece of history is attached to it, Biraha, a popular folk among the locals. There are ample places in Bihar where Holi is being celebrated throughout the day. In the first half, people can be seen playing with colors and in the latter part of the day, there are folk songs and dances.

2. Language of Bihar 

Throughout Bihar, Hindi is spoken with a unique Bihari accent. Around 20 districts of Bihar speak Maithili and Bajjika, and Angika dialects; it is the most widely spoken language in the state. There are approximately ten districts in Bihar where Magahi is the most popular language.

3 . Cuisine in Bihar 

Cuisines prevalent in Bihar include Bhojpuri, Maithil, and Magahi. When we think about Bihari food, the first thing that comes to mind is the famous Litti Chokha. Lithi Chokha is a dish consisting of dough balls made from wheat and gram flour called lithi. This dish consists of boiled potatoes and roasted eggplant known as Chokha and is served with lithi.

People make sharbat with seasonal fruits like wood-apple and watermelon fruit in the summer, and any Bihari breakfast is incomplete without a sattu drink. Sattu is basically flour made out of Bengal gram, but these days it also includes flour of pulses and cereals. These flour are rich in protein and fiber and keep you away from harmful heat waves.

essay on culture and tradition of bihar

Bihar is also famous for its variety of meat dishes which includes Reshmi kababs with a unique taste and flavor. 

Some delicacies are found in only a few cities, such as Champaran, famous for its meat; Pakribarawan, famous for its Vara also known as Bara is a sweet made out of sugar, maida, ghee/refined oil, and finally Sitamarhi, which is known for its meat Balushahi, etc. These dishes are exclusive to the state so don’t miss out on them when you are in Bihar.

 4. Bihar Folk Dance and Music 

Bihar has greatly influenced Indian classical music. Maithili music has produced musicians like Bharat Ratna Ustad Bismillah Khan, dhrupad singers like the Malliks and the Mishras, and poets like Vidyapati Thakur. In Bihar, classical music originates from Hindustani classical music.

Bhojpuri people in Bihar enjoy the Bidesia dance because it is very popular among tribal people and is prevalent more often in the areas where they speak Bhojpuri. The dance of Jat-Jatin is famous in Bihar’s north, and Jijya is another famous dance in Bihar.

Birth and marriage ceremonies in Bihar are incomplete without traditional songs dating back before Brahma. Songs are primarily sung in groups without many instruments. The musical instruments you can find are the dholak, tabla, and harmonium; these instruments make the song even more melodious.

5. Paintings and Craft in Bihar 

Bihar is known for its handicrafts, including hand-painted wall hangings, wooden stools, miniatures in paper and leaves, stone pottery, leather goods, and appliques.

Apart from all this, It is famous for its art and craft, including Sujini embroidery, Sikkigrass work, Yampuri puppets, Tikuli work, Bangla work, lacquerware ceramics, bamboo works, and printed textiles.

essay on culture and tradition of bihar

Artworks like these are commonly displayed in city homes and exported as well. The works of Madhubani artists narrate mythological and religious events and are exclusively designed by women from Mithila. They use natural colors on paper and cloth to depict this in an artistic way. Since you have already learned a lot about Bihar’s rich culture and traditions, it is high time to book a tour now and witness the glory of the marvelous state. Plan your wholesome Bihar holiday with Thrillophilia here .

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I have been travelling across India for a long time and I am using this blog to share my experiences with you so that you can see the tremendous beauty which India has to offer. Thrillophilia Blog

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Essay on Bihar in English for Students | 500+ Words Essay

December 10, 2020 by Sandeep

Essay on Bihar: Bihar is the state located in the eastern part of India. It is nestled around Nepal, Uttar Pradesh, West Bengal and Jharkhand. It has a sub-tropical climate experiencing hot summers and cold winters. Agriculture is the main occupation in Bihar. Due to the favourable climate and good quality soil, it is the major producer of fruits and vegetables.The famous festival of Bihar is Chhath Pooja which is celebrated along the banks of the river by performing rituals. Popular cuisines like Litti Chokha, Sattu Paratha and Khaja are enjoyed by the people. Hindi and Urdu languages are spoken by the population of the state. Bodhi-Tree is an emblem of the state. Prominent places like, Bodh-Gaya, Darbhanga and Nalanda are the well-known tourist’s attraction.

Below we have provided Essay on Bihar in English, written in easy and simple words for class 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10 students.

Essay on Bihar in 500 Words

Below we have provided Bihar Essay, usually given for class 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10.

Bihar is a state located in the eastern part of India. The state is surrounded by West Bengal in the east, Nepal in the north, Uttar Pradesh in the west and Jharkhand in the south. The capital of Bihar is Patna. The name Bihar comes from the word Vihara, which means abode. It is a composition of thirty-eight districts and holds the eleventh position in India’s area. Hindi is the official language, and Urdu is the second official language. Moreover, the state emblem of Bihar is a Bodhi tree. The state animal is bear, and the state bird is an owl.

Several kingdoms existed in the ancient period. One of the kings called Videhas, father of the princess Sita from Ramayan ruled the plains. It was in Magadha period where Gautama Buddha developed the Buddhists religion and then later Mahavira reformed the theology of Jainism. Moreover, King Ashoka, Gupta dynasty even laid their foundation, which transformed the state gradually.

The total area of Bihar is 94,163 km. Ganga River divides the fertile plain unevenly. The centre of the Bihar consists of some hills, such as Rajgir hills. The climate of Bihar is diverse with a sub-tropical temperature in general, having hot summers and cold winters. The most suitable time to visit Bihar is in winter as it is the most pleasant part of the year. Though the vegetation of Bihar has a deciduous forest, only a small fraction of the total area is forested.

Mixed shrubs, grass and reeds dominate the forest. Common trees include bamboo, banyan and palmyra palms. The Himalayan foothills witness the most concentration of forest cover. Large mammals like Bengal tiger, leopards, elephants and different species of deer are found. Along the Kosi River, crocodile seems to rule. Also, birds, reptiles and fish are common in the state. Valmiki National park holds the 18th position in terms of tiger population. Moreover, other notable reserves include Gautama Buddha Wildlife Sanctuary, Kaimur Wildlife Sanctuary and Bhimbandh Wildlife Sanctuary.

Bihar’s economy is largely depended on agriculture. It is the fourth largest state to produce vegetables and fruits in India. The chief agriculture crops are litchi, guava, mango, pineapple, cauliflower, cabbage, rice, wheat, and sunflower. The state’s 80% of the population is employed in agriculture. Favourable climate and fertile soil are the conditions that favour agriculture, but it can be sabotaging during flood and storms.

The major industrial centres in Bihar are Barauni and Hajipur. Gradually, the government has taken the initiative to improve the industrial sector in the state, especially in Patna city. Soon the project of the expressway from the Purvanchal border through Bihar to Jharkhand is estimated to complete.

Among the paintings, Mithila painting is the famous style of painting used in Bihar. The painting is also known as Madhubani art which depicts the association of humans with nature. It is usually done on walls during festivals, marriages and events. Notable Mithila painters like the late Ganga Devi, Sita Devi and Mahasundari Devi were born in Bihar.

The painting was traditionally practised by women and passed down to generation. Bihar is rich in culture and known as the land of Buddha because Gautama Buddha attained enlightenment at Bodh-Gaya. The famous dishes that encompass the cuisine are Litti Chokha, Sattu Paratha, Bihari Boti and Bihari Kebabs. In dessert, they prefer eating Khaja a traditional sweet dish. The most celebrated festival is the Chhath Puja.

The best tourist’s attraction is the ancient monuments which reflect the culture and heritage of Bihar. Monuments like Sabhyata Dwar in Patna, Bodh-Gaya, Darbhanga, the ancient city of Vaishali, etc. are visited. Around 24 million people visit Bihar each year. Furthermore, it is also well-known for religious places. Several Hindu, Buddhists, Jains and Muslims shrines are constructed which abound this ancient land.

If we date back in history, Bihar was known as the centre of learning as the prominent universities like Nalanda and Vikramashila reside here. Items of the woodcarving, brass work, bamboo work, Zari embroidery, lacquer bangles and the popular Bhagalpur sarees can be bought from the state.

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A Glimpse Into The Rich Culture & Traditions Of Bihar

  • Post author: IO Blogs
  • Post published: October 8, 2023
  • Post category: IO-Blogs
  • Post comments: 0 Comments

Bihar, a state in eastern India, is not just a land of historical significance but also a treasure trove of rich culture and traditions. Encompassing diverse art forms, festivals, cuisines, and rituals, Bihar’s cultural tapestry reflects the state’s deep-rooted heritage and the amalgamation of various influences over centuries. In this comprehensive exploration, let’s delve into the multifaceted aspects of Bihar’s culture and traditions, providing a glimpse into the vibrant and colorful life of its people.

1. Historical Significance:

Bihar, often referred to as the “Cradle of Buddhism,” boasts an illustrious past. It was the seat of several ancient kingdoms, including Magadh, Maurya, Gupta, and Pala dynasties. The historical sites of Nalanda, Bodh Gaya, and Rajgir bear witness to Bihar’s glorious past, attracting tourists and scholars from across the globe.

2. Language and Literature:

Bihar is a melting pot of languages, with Hindi, Bhojpuri, and Magahi being widely spoken. The state has a rich literary tradition, with renowned poets and writers like Ramdhari Singh Dinkar, Phanishwar Nath ‘Renu,’ and Vidyapati contributing significantly to Hindi and Maithili literature. The state also celebrates its oral traditions through folk songs, storytelling, and theater performances.

3. Arts and Crafts:

Bihar is known for its vibrant arts and crafts. Madhubani painting, a traditional art form originating from the Mithila region, is famous for its intricate designs and vibrant colors. Sikki grass products, stone carvings, and Tikuli art (hand-painted decorative items) are some other traditional crafts that showcase the skilled craftsmanship of the local artisans.

4. Festivals and Celebrations:

Bihar’s calendar is dotted with numerous festivals, each celebrated with great fervor and enthusiasm. Chhath Puja , dedicated to the Sun God, is one of the most significant festivals in Bihar. Devotees offer prayers to the sun and take part in rituals near rivers or ponds, creating a mesmerizing spectacle. Saraswati Puja , Durga Puja , Diwali , and Holi are celebrated with equal zeal, filling the air with joy and festivity.

5. Dance and Music:

Bihar boasts a rich tradition of dance and music. Jat-Jatin and Jhijhian are traditional folk dances performed during festivals and social gatherings. Bidesia , a form of folk music, narrates tales of migration and separation, reflecting the emotions of the people. Bhojpuri folk songs, accompanied by instruments like tabla, harmonium, and dholak, add to the cultural vibrancy of the state.

6. Cuisine:

Bihari cuisine is a gastronomic delight, offering a plethora of flavors and textures. Litti Chokha , a baked wheat-flour ball served with mashed vegetables, is a popular dish. Dal Pitha (steamed rice dumplings with lentil filling), Thekua (deep-fried sweet snack), and Peda (sweet milk-based dessert) are some other delicacies that tantalize the taste buds. Bihari cuisine is characterized by its simplicity, yet it delivers an explosion of flavors.

7. Rituals and Traditions:

Bihar is a land of diverse rituals and traditions, reflecting the religious and cultural diversity of its people. Tarpan , a ritual offering to ancestors, is performed with great reverence. The Bihula-Bisahari tradition involves singing folk songs and telling stories related to Bihula, a legendary character, during the monsoon season. Pitri Paksha , a period dedicated to honoring departed ancestors, is observed with various rituals and offerings.

8. Hospitality and Social Values:

Hospitality is an integral part of Bihar’s culture. Guests are considered representatives of the gods and are treated with utmost respect and warmth. The social fabric of Bihar emphasizes values such as respect for elders, humility, and communal harmony. The concept of “Atithi Devo Bhava” (the guest is god) is deeply ingrained in the cultural ethos of the state.

9. Traditional Games and Sports:

Bihar has a rich tradition of traditional games and sports. Kabaddi , Gilli Danda , and Kho-Kho are popular outdoor games enjoyed by people of all ages. The state also has a strong tradition of wrestling, with local “Akhadas” nurturing young talents and preserving this ancient sport.

10. Folklore and Mythology:

Bihar’s folklore and mythology are replete with captivating tales and legends. Stories of kings and queens, saints and sages, and mythical creatures have been passed down through generations, enriching the cultural heritage of the state. These stories find expression in various art forms, dance performances, and folk songs.

In conclusion, Bihar’s rich culture and traditions provide a captivating glimpse into the soul of this ancient land. The state’s cultural heritage, deeply intertwined with its historical legacy, continues to thrive, captivating the hearts of those who explore its diverse facets. Whether it’s the colorful festivals, soul-stirring music, delectable cuisine, or intricate arts and crafts, Bihar offers a vibrant and immersive experience for anyone keen to dive into its cultural depths. So, for travelers seeking a profound encounter with tradition, folklore, and the essence of Indian heritage, Bihar stands as an inviting destination, ready to unveil its cultural treasures to the world.

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Essay on Bihar: An Insight into the State's Rich Culture and Heritage

essay on bihar

Essay on Bihar in English

Bihar is a state in eastern India that has a rich cultural and historical heritage. It is known for its ancient sites, unique handicrafts, and rich literature. The state is also famous for producing some of the greatest scholars, poets, and philosophers of India, such as Aryabhatta, Chanakya, and Vidyapati.

Bihar has a long and rich history that dates back to ancient times. The region that is now Bihar was first inhabited by humans during the Paleolithic era, with evidence of human settlement dating back to around 250,000 years ago.

In the centuries that followed, Bihar became an important center of the Magadha empire, which was one of the most powerful empires in ancient India. The Magadha empire was known for its military might and cultural achievements, and it played a key role in the spread of Buddhism throughout India and beyond.

During the medieval period, Bihar was ruled by various dynasties, including the Mauryas, Guptas, and Mughals. These rulers left their mark on the region in the form of art, architecture, and literature, and their legacy is still visible in Bihar today.

In modern times, Bihar has been a center of political and social change in India. It played a key role in India's struggle for independence from British colonial rule, and it has been at the forefront of various social movements aimed at promoting equality and justice.

Today, Bihar is a vibrant and diverse state that is home to people of many different cultures and religions. It is known for its unique handicrafts, rich literature, and festivals, and it continues to be an important center of learning and culture in India.

Geography of Bihar

Bihar is a state in eastern India that is located in the fertile Ganges River basin. It is surrounded by the states of Uttar Pradesh to the west, Jharkhand to the south, and West Bengal to the east.

Bihar has a total area of 94,163 square kilometers, making it the twelfth largest state in India by area. The state has a diverse geography that includes the fertile Gangetic plain, the Chota Nagpur plateau, and the Himalayan foothills.

The Gangetic plain is the most dominant feature of Bihar's geography, covering about 80% of the state's area. The Ganges River, which is one of the most sacred rivers in India, flows through Bihar and is an important source of water for irrigation and other purposes.

The Chota Nagpur plateau, which covers the southern part of the state, is rich in minerals such as coal, iron ore, and bauxite. The plateau is also known for its rich biodiversity and is home to several wildlife sanctuaries and national parks.

The northern part of Bihar is located in the foothills of the Himalayas and is known for its scenic beauty and cool climate. The state's highest peak, Mount Kanchenjunga, is located in the Himalayan foothills and is a popular destination for trekkers and nature lovers.

Bihar has a diverse flora and fauna that includes several endangered species such as the Indian rhinoceros, the Bengal tiger, and the Asian elephant. The state also has several important wetlands and bird sanctuaries that are important for migratory birds.

Overall, Bihar's geography is rich and diverse, offering a range of natural and cultural attractions for visitors and residents alike.

Bihar is a state in eastern India that has a rich and diverse culture that has been shaped by its history, geography, and people. Here are some key aspects of Bihar's culture:

  • Literature: Bihar has a rich literary tradition that dates back to ancient times. The state has produced several famous writers and poets, including Vidyapati, who is considered one of the greatest poets in the Maithili language. Other notable writers from Bihar include Ramdhari Singh 'Dinkar', Phanishwar Nath Renu, and Shrilal Shukla.
  • Cuisine: Bihar's cuisine is known for its simplicity and use of locally grown ingredients. Some popular dishes include litti chokha, sattu paratha, and khaja. Bihari cuisine also includes a range of sweets and desserts, such as tilkut, peda, and rabri.
  • Music and dance: Bihar has a vibrant music and dance culture that includes traditional folk songs and dances such as the Jat-Jatin and the Jhumar. Bihari music also includes Bhojpuri songs, which are popular throughout northern India.
  • Festivals: Bihar celebrates a range of festivals throughout the year, including Holi, Diwali, Chhath Puja, and Durga Puja. Chhath Puja, in particular, is an important festival in Bihar and is celebrated with great enthusiasm and devotion.
  • Handicrafts: Bihar is known for its unique handicrafts, such as Madhubani paintings, Sujani embroidery, and Tikuli art. These handicrafts are not only popular in India but are also exported to other countries.
  • Education: Bihar has a long history of education and has been a center of learning since ancient times. The state is home to several important educational institutions, including the ancient Nalanda University, which was a major center of Buddhist learning.

Overall, Bihar's culture is diverse and unique, reflecting the state's rich history and traditions. It is a testament to the resilience and creativity of its people, who continue to celebrate and preserve their cultural heritage.

People of Bihar

Bihar is a state in eastern India that is known for its warm and hospitable people. The people of Bihar are diverse, with a rich cultural heritage that has been shaped by their history, geography, and traditions.

Here are some key aspects of the people of Bihar:

  • Diversity: Bihar is home to people from diverse backgrounds, including Maithili, Bhojpuri, Magahi, and Angika. The state also has a significant population of minorities, including Muslims and Christians.
  • Hospitality: The people of Bihar are known for their warm and welcoming nature. They take pride in their culture and traditions and are always eager to share their customs with others.
  • Hardworking: Bihar has a large rural population, and the people are known for their hard work and resilience. They have a strong work ethic and are determined to improve their lives and the lives of their families.
  • Education: Education is highly valued in Bihar, and the state has produced several notable scholars and intellectuals. The ancient Nalanda University, which was located in Bihar, was a major center of learning in ancient times.
  • Creativity: The people of Bihar are known for their creativity and artistic skills. They have a rich tradition of handicrafts, such as Madhubani paintings and Tikuli art.
  • Food: Bihari cuisine is famous for its simplicity and use of locally grown ingredients. The people of Bihar take great pride in their cuisine and are always eager to share it with others.

Overall, the people of Bihar are a diverse and welcoming community with a rich cultural heritage. They are hardworking, creative, and deeply proud of their traditions and customs.

Short Essay on Bihar in English

Bihar is a state in eastern India, known for its rich history and cultural heritage. It is one of the oldest inhabited regions in the world, with evidence of human habitation dating back to the ancient times. The state is home to numerous historical sites, temples, and monuments, which attract tourists from all over the world.

One of the most prominent landmarks in Bihar is the Mahabodhi Temple in Bodh Gaya, which is a UNESCO World Heritage site. This temple is believed to be the place where Lord Buddha attained enlightenment, making it a significant pilgrimage destination for Buddhists worldwide.

Another important tourist destination in Bihar is the Nalanda University, which was one of the oldest universities in the world. Founded in the 5th century AD, the university was a center of learning and research for students from all over the world. Today, the ruins of the university serve as a testimony to the rich intellectual and cultural heritage of the state.

Bihar is also known for its rich art and craft traditions, which include Madhubani paintings, stone carvings, and lacquerware. These crafts are created by skilled artisans using traditional techniques that have been passed down through generations.

Also Read:   Essay on Assam: Exploring the Culture and Heritage of Assam

In recent years, Bihar has made significant progress in areas such as agriculture, education, and healthcare. The state has implemented various schemes and initiatives to improve the standard of living of its people, including the provision of free education and healthcare for all.

Despite these developments, Bihar faces significant challenges, such as poverty, unemployment, and inadequate infrastructure. The state is also prone to natural disasters such as floods and droughts, which often cause widespread damage and loss of life.

In conclusion, Bihar is a state with a rich cultural and historical heritage, which has made significant progress in recent years. However, it still faces numerous challenges that need to be addressed to ensure the well-being of its people.

10 Lines Essay on Bihar

  • Bihar is a state in eastern India with a population of over 120 million people.
  • The state covers an area of 94,163 square kilometers and is bordered by Uttar Pradesh, Jharkhand, West Bengal, and Nepal.
  • The capital of Bihar is Patna, which is also the largest city in the state.
  • Bihar is known for its rich cultural and historical heritage, with several ancient sites and monuments located throughout the state.
  • The Mahabodhi Temple in Bodh Gaya, which is a UNESCO World Heritage site, is a significant pilgrimage destination for Buddhists worldwide.
  • Nalanda University, located in the state, was one of the oldest universities in the world.
  • Bihar is also known for its art and craft traditions, including Madhubani paintings, stone carvings, and lacquerware.
  • The state's economy is primarily based on agriculture, with rice being the main crop grown.
  • Bihar has made significant progress in recent years in areas such as education and healthcare, with several schemes and initiatives implemented to improve the standard of living of its people.
  • Despite these developments, Bihar still faces several challenges, including poverty, unemployment, and inadequate infrastructure.

Q: Where is Bihar located?

A: Bihar is a state located in eastern India. It is bordered by Uttar Pradesh, Jharkhand, West Bengal, and Nepal.

Q: What is the capital of Bihar?

A: The capital of Bihar is Patna, which is also the largest city in the state.

Q: What is the population of Bihar?

A: The population of Bihar is over 120 million people, making it one of the most populous states in India.

Q: What is the main language spoken in Bihar?

A: The main language spoken in Bihar is Hindi. However, other languages such as Maithili, Bhojpuri, and Magahi are also widely spoken.

Q: What are some famous tourist attractions in Bihar?

A: Bihar is known for its rich cultural and historical heritage, with several ancient sites and monuments located throughout the state. Some famous tourist attractions include the Mahabodhi Temple in Bodh Gaya, Nalanda University, and the ancient city of Vaishali.

Q: What is the economy of Bihar based on?

A: The economy of Bihar is primarily based on agriculture, with rice being the main crop grown. However, the state has also made progress in areas such as manufacturing and service industries in recent years.

Q: What are some of the challenges faced by Bihar?

A: Bihar still faces several challenges, including poverty, unemployment, and inadequate infrastructure. The state is also prone to natural disasters such as floods and droughts, which often cause widespread damage and loss of life. However, the state government has implemented several schemes and initiatives to address these challenges and improve the standard of living of its people.

Bihar is a state with a rich cultural and historical heritage that continues to attract tourists from all over the world. Despite facing several challenges such as poverty, unemployment, and inadequate infrastructure, the state has made significant progress in recent years in areas such as education and healthcare. Bihar's economy, which is primarily based on agriculture, has also shown promising developments in manufacturing and service industries.

The state's government has implemented several schemes and initiatives to address these challenges and improve the standard of living of its people. With its vibrant culture, rich history, and natural beauty, Bihar has the potential to become a major economic and tourist hub in India.

We hope that you enjoyed reading essay on bihar. If you have any queries or issues, please feel free to connect with us on our  Facebook page . We are always happy to help and would love to hear your feedback. Thank you for taking the time to read our essay, and we look forward to hearing from you soon.

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essay on culture and tradition of bihar

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Bihar culture.

Bihar Culture Dance

Rich in diversity, Bihari culture is a neat mosaic of three major religions - Hinduism, Buddhism and Jainism - that had defined its literature, arts and crafts, cuisine, architecture and festivals.

Gautam Buddha attained enlightenment at Bodh Gaya, a town in the Gaya district that gave rise to Buddhism which spread across the world. Also, Vardhamana Mahavira, the 24th and the last Tirthankara of Jainism, was born in Vaishali around the 6th Century B.C.

Religious life of Bihar

A Bihari household will usher day with religious piety by the blowing of a conch shell informing the arrival of dawn. While Hindu priests recite mantras in temples, a Buddhist monk uttering a low-pitched chant and a church bell tolls - thus filling the air with a inter-religious mix of prayers from different faiths.

Every aspect of life is filled with religious connotations; the state has edifices and structures that narrate a harmonious blend of lifestyles drawn from Hinduism, Buddhism and Jainism.

The religious symbols, Gods and Goddesses can be seen in the nook and corner of a place.

Moreover, the calendar is filled with festivals and fairs of different faiths living in unity for centuries.

Famous Festivals in Bihar

Chhath Puja

People celebrate festivals and religious events with absolute sense of happiness which is shared across communities. The Holy festival is a grand occasion for merrymaking and fun among the Biharis.

  • Chatt Puja: This is celebrated twice a year in Chaitra and the next in the month of Kartik. The Sun God is worshipped and people maintain purity of body for well over a month, though the festival is held for four days only. Especially women observe fast during puja for the prosperity of their families.
  • Sama-Chakeva: During winter as birds migrate from Himalayas to Mithila, girls make idols of avian creatures and decorate them. This festival welcomes birds and wishes them to go back to their original abodes safely.
  • Ramnavami: The Hindus observe the birthday of Lord Ram with day-long fasting and prayers.
  • Makar-Sankranti: Known as harvest festival, this ushers in summer time. Also called Tila Sankranti, the poor are fed on the occasion, besides fasting and praying.
  • Bihula: Those living in Bhagalpur district pray to Goddess Manasa for the wellness of the family.
  • Madhushravani: Mithilanchal district observes this festival with joy in order to remind people to follow traditional and religious life.
  • Teej: It is a women's festival dedicated to Goddess Parvathi and Lord Shiva
  • Pitrapaksha Mela: In Gaya district, relatives of the dead offer Pindaadan for the departed soul to attain salvation.
  • Sonepur fair: This is an animal exhibition, one of Asia's biggest, that is held for 15 days as millions visit to buy and sell a range of animals for domestication and business.
  • Shravani Mela: Every year in July-August, Sultanganj hosts this festival of religious importance. A similar festival called Bihula-Bishari Puja of Anga region attracts thousands of people each year.

Other major festivals of national importance like Saraswati Puja, Holi, Ramzan, Bakrid, Mahashivaratri, Durga Puja, Diwali, Buddha Purnima, Christmas and Mahavir Jayanti are also celebrated with enthusiasm.

Food Culture of Bihar

Bihar Cuisine

The staple foods of Biharis are bhat, dal, roti, tarkari and achar. It is prepared from rice, lentils, wheat flour, vegetables, and pickle. And mustard oil is used liberally to cook food.

Most Hindus in Bihar consume khichdi, a broth of rice and lentils seasoned with spices and usually served with side dishes as their mid-day meal during the weekend.

However, the favourite dish of Biharis is Litti Chokha. While Litti is made up of Sattu, Chokha is a mix of smashed potato, tomato and brinjal.

Apart from these, Biharis prepare a range of dry fruits that are mostly made in areas in and around Patna.

Traditional Bihar Folk Songs and Dances

Bihar has ancient tradition of melodious folk songs that are rendered on family occasions like marriage, birth ceremony and numerous festivals.

Womenfolk sing them in groups without any major instruments, though at times a tabla, harmonium, bansuri or a dholak is used by them to add momentum to the chorus.

During Holi, songs known as phagua rent the air with funny notes.

Madhubani Paintings in Bihar

Madhubani Paintings

The visual arts and crafts have been the source of livelihood for many artisans. Here is the typical Bihari style of painting:

Madhubani or Mithila paintings:

Usually done on newly plastered mud wall of huts. Over the years, this painting graduated into broader canvases like cloth, handmade paper and other medium.

The painting narrates the long association between man and nature, beautiful landscapes, Hindu deities like Krishna, Ram, Shiva and Durga from ancient literature. The planetary objects like the sun, moon and religious symbols like tulsi plant are also painting on a range of canvas, apart from scenes in royal court.

Bronze sculptures, statues: These artefacts date back to Mauryan kingdom which patronised many arts and crafts.

The pillars of Ashoka and Didarganj Yakshi are more than 2,000 years old and carved out of single rock. It is common to see a multiplicity of statues and carved artefacts in all districts of Bihar representing its hoary tradition and heritage.

Hindu temples of Mauryan dynasty, Buddhist stupas, monasteries, Mughal edifices, Indo-Islamic and Indo-Sarasenic architectures are most visible even in the present day Bihar.

Royal priest Chanakya, in his treatise Arthashastra, suggests the use of brick and stone in building structures to ensure their durability. Many stupas in Nalanda and Vikramshila were originally built with the process of brick and masonry during the reign of Ashoka.

The Buddhist stupa, a dome shaped monument, was first used in Bihar as a commemorative structure used for storing sacred relics and later on became popular in Southeast Asia as Pagoda.

Buddhist style blended with Roman and Hellenestic architectures to give rise to a unique blend called Greco-Buddhist school.

The Persian influence in architecture is the result of Mughal invasion starting from 12th Century.

Sher Shah Suri and his successor created some elegant like Sher Shah Suri Tomb. Likewise Makhdum Daulat mausoleum (1616) showcased Persian architecture.

The Maner Sharif building has its wall decorated with intricate designs and applique works and a big dome on top and the ceiling are full of inscriptions from Holy Quran.

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Essay on Bihar

Students are often asked to write an essay on Bihar in their schools and colleges. And if you’re also looking for the same, we have created 100-word, 250-word, and 500-word essays on the topic.

Let’s take a look…

100 Words Essay on Bihar

Introduction.

Bihar is a state in the eastern part of India. It is the third-largest state in terms of population. The capital city is Patna.

Bihar has a rich history. It was the center of power, learning, and culture in ancient India. It is the birthplace of Buddhism.

Bihar’s culture is very diverse. It is known for its music, dance, and festivals. Bihari cuisine is also very famous.

Bihar’s economy is primarily agricultural. It is a major producer of vegetables and fruits. It also has a growing service sector.

Bihar is a state with a rich history and diverse culture. It has a lot to offer to its residents and visitors.

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250 Words Essay on Bihar

Bihar, located in the eastern part of India, is a state rich in history and culture. Known for its ancient universities and religious sites, Bihar has been a significant center of learning, culture, and power in ancient and classical India.

Historical Significance

Bihar’s historical significance is unparalleled. It was the center of the Maurya and Gupta empires, two of the most powerful dynasties in Indian history. The state was also the birthplace of Buddhism, with Gautama Buddha achieving enlightenment in Bodh Gaya, a town in Bihar.

Cultural Diversity

Bihar’s culture is a blend of diverse traditions and practices. The state is known for its unique art forms like Madhubani painting and traditional dance styles such as Jat-Jatin and Bidesia. The Bihari cuisine, with dishes like Litti Chokha and Sattu Paratha, is famous for its flavors and simplicity.

Economic Aspects

Bihar’s economy primarily revolves around agriculture, with rice, wheat, and lentils as major crops. Despite its agricultural predominance, Bihar faces several challenges like poverty and lack of industrialization. However, recent years have seen significant efforts towards infrastructural development and economic reform.

Bihar, with its rich history and cultural diversity, holds a unique place in the Indian subcontinent. Despite economic challenges, the state continues to progress, striving to balance its historical legacy with modern development. The essence of Bihar lies in its resilience and the vibrant amalgamation of tradition and transformation.

500 Words Essay on Bihar

Bihar, an Indian state, is a region of historic and cultural significance. Known for its rich history, vibrant culture, and diverse population, Bihar is a fascinating study in contrasts. It is a place where ancient traditions coexist with modern development, where the urban and rural landscapes merge seamlessly.

Bihar’s history dates back to the dawn of Indian civilization. It was the center of power, learning, and culture in ancient and classical India. The state was home to two of India’s major empires, the Maurya Empire and Gupta Empire. Bihar is also the birthplace of Buddhism, with Bodh Gaya, the place where Gautam Buddha attained enlightenment, located here. The remnants of its glorious past, such as the ruins of Nalanda University, are still visible today and serve as a testament to Bihar’s historical significance.

Bihar’s culture is a rich tapestry of diverse traditions, languages, and festivals. The state’s cultural heritage is reflected in its folk music, dance, and art forms. Bihari cuisine, known for its distinctive flavors and variety, also reflects the state’s cultural diversity. Festivals like Chhath Puja, which is unique to Bihar, showcase the state’s vibrant traditions and religious fervor.

Economy and Development

Bihar’s economy has traditionally been agrarian, with agriculture employing the majority of the population. The state is a major producer of fruits, vegetables, and grains in India. However, in recent years, Bihar has made significant strides in its economic development. The state government has implemented several initiatives to promote industrial growth and infrastructural development. Despite these advancements, Bihar continues to face challenges such as poverty, unemployment, and underdevelopment.

Education and Social Challenges

Education in Bihar has seen considerable improvement over the years. The state government has made concerted efforts to increase literacy rates and improve the quality of education. However, Bihar still grapples with issues like gender disparity in education and inadequate educational infrastructure.

Socially, Bihar is a melting pot of various castes, religions, and ethnic groups. While this diversity is a strength, it also presents challenges. Caste-based discrimination and communal tensions are some of the social issues that Bihar faces.

Bihar, with its rich history and cultural diversity, is a state that encapsulates the essence of India. Despite its challenges, Bihar’s potential for growth and development is immense. The state’s journey from a cradle of civilization to a developing region in modern India is a testament to its resilience and dynamism. The future of Bihar lies in leveraging its historical legacy and cultural richness while addressing its socio-economic challenges.

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The Land of Bihar and its Wholesome Food

The state of Bihar is situated in the eastern region of the Indian mainland. This landlocked region is famous for its ancient traditions and heritage sites including Bodh Gaya, where Buddha attained enlightenment, the ancient Nalanda University, for the sweet and lilting Bhojpuri language, and much more. While Bihari cuisine has many distinctive dishes, unfortunately, they are not widely known in the rest of the country.

Pilgrims at the Mahabodhi Temple. Image source: Wikimedia Commons.

Pilgrims at the Mahabodhi Temple. Image source: Wikimedia Commons.

The ancient Nalanda University.  Image source: Wikimedia Commons.

The ancient Nalanda University. Image source: Wikimedia Commons.

This is partly because Bihari cuisine is often subsumed in the larger North Indian culinary practices, disallowing specific study of the Bihari spread. Moreover, certain Bihari dishes like Litti Chokha have received exceptional focus, ultimately leading to the outshining of other equally unique recipes of the state.

Panch Phoran. Image source: Wikimedia commons

Panch Phoran . Image source: Wikimedia commons

Geography, Staples and Unique Features

Bihari cuisine, however, is very varied and wholesome. Geographically, Bihar lies on the Indo-Gangetic plain which makes it suitable for intensive agriculture. It is one of the major producers of rice in India. More than 60 varieties of rice are cultivated here. It is both the commercial and the staple crop, and daal-bhaat ( daal and rice) is the most commonly eaten food in Bihar.

Speaking of distinctive features, Bihari culinary techniques involve a great deal of deep-frying, roasting ( bhoonna ) and steaming. Mustard oil is the preferred cooking base, though vegetable oils are also used. One of the most distinctive cooking techniques of Biharis is the use of panch-phoran or an amalgamation of five spices which includes cumin seeds ( zeera ), fenugreek seeds ( methi ), nigella seeds ( mangrael/kalonji ), fennel ( saunf ) and carom seeds ( ajwain ). Another common feature is tempering ( chounk ) the food with smoked red chilli for enhanced flavour and aroma.

Sattu Flour. Image source: Wikimedia commons

Sattu Flour. Image source: Wikimedia commons

Sattu sharbat

Sattu Sharbat

The Bihari Platter: Signature Dishes

Since the Bihari platter is so varied and offers a lot of options, different dishes are consumed for different meals throughout the day. Sattu is usually eaten for breakfast. This flour, made by grinding chickpeas, is one of the quintessential food items of Bihar. In most Bihari households, during summer mornings, sattu is served mixed in water, topped with chopped onion and green chillies, and seasoned with salt. This acts as a high-energy drink and is considered a full breakfast meal. It acts as an effective coolant to beat the summer heat.

Traditionally, this high-protein flour is tied up in cloth ( potli ) and carried by the daily wage workers and farmers. During mealtime, they just knead it into a dough with salt, green chillies and onion, make rough balls and consume it. Another way to consume it is to knead sattu with sugar and ghee. This variant is called ghenvada .

Sattu ki puri. Image source: Wikimedia commons

Sattu ki puri . Image source: Wikimedia commons

Other commonly eaten preparations for breakfast include ghugni , a savoury mixture of soaked Bengal gram (chana) cooked in onion and spices, with chooda or beaten rice flakes. In winters, chana is replaced with peas, mixed with chooda and enjoyed as matar ghugni . People also eat puri for breakfast which is fried and salted wheat flour bread. Most of the time, puri is stuffed with spicy sattu mix or dal to get lip-smacking sattu ki puri or dal puri respectively.

Ghugni. Image source: Wikimedia Commons

Ghugni . Image source: Wikimedia Commons

Bihari spicy aloo ki bhujia.

Bihari spicy aloo ki bhujia .

Lunch and Dinner in Bihar is usually daal, bhaat, roti which serves as the base, coupled with a range of sabzi which includes parwal ki sabzi, nenua ki sabzi, kaddu ki sabzi etc. People in Bihar eat a lot of spicy fried vegetables which are called bhujia. Aaloo (potato) and bhindi (okra) ki bhujia are popular dishes.

Lunch and dinner in Bihar are also rarely served without accessories that enhance the overall eating experience. These include papad , coriander ( dhaniya ) chutney, chokha , raita, pickles etc.

Bihar also flaunts a distinguished spread of evening snacks. One can always find groups of people enjoying bhunja with tea in the evening, indulging in passionate debates and discussions in the nooks and corners of the state. Bhunjas are dried and fried grains, seasoned with salt, lemon and spices. There are a range of bhunjas like chooda ka bhunja (fried beaten rice flakes with chopped onions and green chillies), chana ka bhunja (similar preparation with Bengal gram) and jhaal murhi (puffed rice with onions, green chillies, peanuts and mustard oil seasoned with salt).

Crispy and spicy Jhal Murhi

Crispy and spicy Jhal Murhi

Champaran or Ahuna Meat

Champaran or Ahuna Meat

Non-vegetarian Fare

Bihar’s culinary culture is predominantly vegetarian. This is partly because Bihar is one of the largest vegetable-producing states in India and also partly due to its socio-religious history. However, there is a substantial population of non-vegetarian lovers in Bihar too. The state’s acquaintance with non-vegetarian dishes has most likely been due to the influence of the Muslim rulers in Bihar. It started with the Afghan ruler Bakhtiyar Khalji who led expeditions in the eastern region and established his control over both Bengal and Bihar. This venture subsequently paved the way for the Delhi Sultanate and later the Mughals in this region.

The Muslims brought with them their own culinary culture which was predominantly non-vegetarian in nature. In contemporary times, one of the most celebrated meat dishes is Bihari Kabab in which boneless lamb is sliced into long strips, marinated with masala and raw papaya paste, and roasted over coal by applying ghee at sustained intervals. Other dishes include shami kabab, nargisi kofte, pulao gosht etc. The one-pot mutton curry called Champaran meat or Ahuna meat shines as a regional delicacy from the state of Bihar. To prepare this dish, the meat is marinated with desi ghee and mustard oil along with garlic, onions, ginger and select spices. An entire garlic bulb added to the meat gives a unique twist to the flavour. The marinated meat is placed in an earthen pot and the mouth of the vessel is sealed with kneaded flour. It usually takes 2-8 hours of cooking to bring this mouth-watering delicacy to perfection.

Kababs roasted & ready to serve. Image source: Wikimedia Commons

Kababs roasted & ready to serve. Image source: Wikimedia Commons

Although the Brahmins of the region are generally strictly vegetarian, the Brahmins of Mithilanchal (Northern-central Bihar, parts of Jharkhand and Nepal) don’t subscribe to this. Amongst non-vegetarian items, Maithilis predominantly patronize fish. Biharis in general consume a lot of fish. This is primarily because of the wide availability of fish in this region as the Ganga and its tributaries, Son, Gandak, Ghaghara and Kosi rivers flow across Bihar. Rohu, Catla, Patiya, Mangur and Tengda are widely available varieties of fish. Bihar also shares its borders with Bengal and seems to have drawn significant inspiration from its fish-loving neighbor. In fact, fish preparation techniques are more or less similar in both these regions. It is primarily cooked in a mustard paste. Maach-bhaat, Machak-jhor are commonly eaten fish dishes. Biharis also love fried prawns or jhinga .

Machak-jhor. Image source: Wikimedia commons

Machak-jhor . Image source: Wikimedia commons

Balushahi. Image Source: Wikimedia Commons

Balushahi . Image Source: Wikimedia Commons

Sweet Delicacies

This region also boasts of a distinguished range of sweet delicacies. Milk and other dairy products are the base ingredients for a lot of these preparations. Generally, Biharis consume a lot of dairy products and its importance gets best reflected in a Maithili saying: “Aadi Ghee aur Ant Dahi, oyi Bhojan ke Bhojan kahi,” (a good meal is one which starts with ghee and ends with yogurt).

Unlike Bengal, Bihari sweets are mostly dry. Some of the popular ones include Balushahi , (shaped like doughnuts and made with a mixture of maida and ghee and coated in sugar) and Khaja (also made using ghee, maida and sugar but crispy in nature and used a lot in Bihari weddings). The best khaja is said to be found in Silao, a town near Rajgir. Tilkut is a delicacy made from sesame seeds ( til ), using jaggery or sugar. Tilkut of Gaya district is considered best in quality.

Thekua is another very famous confectionery that is eaten primarily during Chhath Puja, where it is made as an offering to the Gods. It is prepared from dough made of wheat flour, ghee, sugar or jaggery and later fried and enjoyed as a snack. Other delectable sweet dishes like doodh pitha, lai, peda, shakarpara etc. are also enjoyed by Biharis.

Thekua. Image Source: Wikimedia Commons

Thekua . Image Source: Wikimedia Commons

Iconic Dishes: Dal-Pitha and Litti Chokha

A discussion on Bihari cuisine is incomplete without the mention of two of its most prominent dishes, which always represent this region, Dal-Pitha and Litti Chokha . Dal-Pitha is a unique food made using rice flour, kneaded into a dough using ghee or oil, rolled flat and stuffed with jaggery (for the sweet Pitha ) or chana dal mixture (for the savoury version). It is then steamed in a steaming container.

Dal Pitha

Litti and Chokha is a popular delicacy of Bihar. It is also consumed in Jharkhand, parts of Eastern Uttar Pradesh and Nepal. Litti is a dough ball made up of wheat flour. It is stuffed with a mixture of sattu with spices, onions, ginger, garlic, lime juice, carom seeds and herbs. Sometimes, pickles are also mixed to add to the flavor. Traditionally, this dough ball was roasted over cow dung cakes, wood or coal and tossed with ghee. In recent times, however, people choose to fry it for the sake of convenience. Litti is eaten with chokha which is a blend of eggplant, potatoes and tomatoes mixed with spices. It is not cooked like a regular sabzi . The vegetables are first roasted, mashed and mixed with finely chopped onions and spices.

Litti and Chokha. Image source: Wikimedia Commons.

Litti and Chokha . Image source: Wikimedia Commons.

It’s believed that litti emerged in Magadha, which was an ancient kingdom in southern Bihar. It was one of the sixteen Mahajanapadas or kingdoms which existed in ancient India from the 6th to the 4th century BCE. For a long time, litti and chokha was also associated with the peasants as it does not require expensive ingredients and the sattu in it especially has cooling properties which kept them active throughout the day.

It has been said that during the Revolt of 1857, this meal was preferred because- it could be easily baked with minimal ingredients, was filling in nature and could last up to three days. It’s said that Tantia Tope and Rani Lakshmi Bai made it their travel meal. With the coming of the Mughals, this dish underwent some changes. Litti began to be served with shorba (meat’s gravy) and paya (curry made up of hoof of goat or sheep with spices and herbs). In contemporary times, litti and chokha transcend class boundaries and is eaten by every stratum of Bihari society.

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1 Essay On Culture And Tradition Of Bihar

The Biharis celebrates the festival of Chaath dedicated to Sun God with major pomp and it usually begins on the fourth day of the month of Kartik Shukhla Paksha which falls either in the month of October or November. Some of their main crops include rice, wheat, lentils, maize corn and sugar cane along with fruits like mangoes, bananas, jack-fruit, and litchis. The Biharis is excellent in their arts and crafts and are known for their Madhubani Painting which is exclusive to the state. Chhara , Hansuli , Kamarbandh are some of the traditional Bihari jewelries. The features of these paintings are that they are done with coloured paste made with rice powder. Bihari cuisine is a blend of different regions of India and it is very much known for its rich dairy products and sweets. The Biharis are noted for their traditional Madhubani paintings. This painting is supposed to be very indigenous because it was at the time of Ramayana, that Janak King asked his men to draw Madhubani Painting on the walls depicting the marriage of Ram and Sita. The major occupation of Biharis is agriculture. Though western outfit are getting quite popular among the rural and urban population in Bihar, the traditional costumes of the Biharis always has its ethnic values. The Biharis are known for the different kinds of stuffed parathas they make. No breakfast of a Bihari is without Sattu. Litti chokha is a famous Bihari dish which is usually eaten with sattu paratha . Biharis with a rich cultural heritage is blended with major epics like Mahabharata and Ramayana and the state is a land to major religions. Cane weaving is also practiced by the Biharis for the area is rich in hard wood timber, saal and sakhua. The history of Bihari dates back to three millennia whose origins are of Indo-Aryan ethnic group. Bihar is valued highly with rich culture and heritage and is home to many native art forms. Lot of geometrical patterns are added in these paintings. The culture of Bihar can be best expressed as comprising the following. Men s traditional costume includes dhoti, kurta, and kharaun wooden sandal. Even now special occasions like festivals, religious events, birth, Upanayanam and marriage are not complete without these paintings. Otherwise normally a Bihari meal has bhat rice , dal lentil , tarkari vegetable and achar pickle. Based on the origin and the relationship the state of Bihar is divided into castes and sub castes.

Sattu is powdered gram which is used in the preparation of litti, stuffed parathas, salty and spicy drinks, etc. The han- dia, a beverage prepared by using fermented rice, is very popular among the tribal communities. The Chaath festival is considered to be very holy among the Biharis and is celebrated for at least four days. Another important thing of the Bihari cuisine is seasoning with panchforan which is a mixture of seeds containing five elements in equal parts, namely jeera cumin seed ,kalaunji mangraeel seed , methi fenugreek seed , saunf aniseed and sarson mustard seeds. Sattu drink is mainly had during the summer season. The women of Bihar have also started wearing the urban outfit like the salwar kameez. The origin of Buddhism religion took place in Bihar and it is also the place where one of India s major dynasties namely the Maurya dynasty originated. Choka which is prepared with mashed potatoes is also an important dish of the Biharis. Turbans commonly known as Paag are also a part of the traditional costume of men of Bihar, which is supposed to mark the status of the man wearing it. The mud walls of some places like Saharsa, Muzaffarpur, Vaishali, Darbhanga, Samastipur, and Bhagalpur are also adorned with Madhubani paintings. Thus Bihar is noted for its rich cultural heritage for it houses many universities, and historically and culturally valued places.

Lot of geometrical patterns are added in these paintings. The culture of Bihar can be best expressed as comprising the following. Men s traditional costume includes dhoti, kurta, and kharaun wooden sandal. Even now special occasions like festivals, religious events, birth, Upanayanam and marriage are not complete without these paintings. Otherwise normally a Bihari meal has bhat rice , dal lentil , tarkari vegetable and achar pickle. Based on the origin and the relationship the state of Bihar is divided into castes and sub castes.

Even now special occasions like festivals, religious events, birth, Upanayanam and marriage are not complete without these paintings. Otherwise normally a Bihari meal has bhat rice , dal lentil , tarkari vegetable and achar pickle. Based on the origin and the relationship the state of Bihar is divided into castes and sub castes.

Thus Bihar is noted for its rich cultural heritage for it houses many universities, and historically and culturally valued places.

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9 Colourful Festivals and Fairs from the Land of Bihar

But there is one festival that is uniquely associated with Bihar, and that is the festival of Chhath.  Today, we bring you a list of festivals from the Land of Biharis- Bihar!

1. Chatth Puja

This is probably the most famous festival of this State. When one hears Chatth Puja, Bihar instantly comes to the mind. This is an actually an ancient Hindu festival which is dedicated to the Sun God, Surya, and take place 6 days after Diwali. It is an expression of thanks giving and seeking blessings from the Almighty for sustaining life on Earth. During this festival, the person observing Chatth, also known as Parvati, observes a fast from dawn to dusk which concludes with sweets. This fast is followed by another fast for 36 hours till the final day, when puja starts at the river, before sunrise. You can witness thousands of devotees and the river during this time. Witnessing Chatth Puja will let you witness the devotion in its true sense.

Chhath Puja

2. Sama Chakeva

During the winter when the birds migrate from the Himalayas towards the plains, the celebration of Sama-Chakeva takes place. This festival is celebrated specifically in Mithila. When the colourful birds migrate towards their land, this festival takes place, marking the brother-sister relationship. It starts with welcoming the pair of birds Sama- Chakeva. The girls make an idol of the birds and decorate them in their own traditional way. After this, the festivities take place with full splendour, and ends by a Vidaai of the Sama, with a wish that these birds return to the land the next year.

Sama Chakeva

3. Shravani Mela

This festival or rather Mela is observed every during the month of Shravan (July-August). It is an important month-long ritual which is held along a 108 km long route linking towns of Deogarh and Sultanganj. The devotees who take part, known as Kanwarias, wear saffron-coloured clothes and collect water from the sacred Ghats at Sultanganj. They then walk barefoot on the 108 km long stretch to Deogarh to bathe the sacred Shiva-linga. This festival draws thousands of people from all around the country every year.

Shravani Mela

4. Sonepur Cattle Fair

This fair of Bihar has its root in ancient mythology and folklore. The Sonepur Cattle fair is the Asia’s largest cattle fair which takes place in the town of Sonepur in Bihar. It is held on Kartik Purnima that is the first full moon after the festival of Diwali. In this fair, domestic cattle like an elephant, camel, sheep and birds are brought in from around the country and sold here. Apart from this, varied handicrafts and handloom stalls are also put up, along with the magic show and folk dances. This fair attracts a large number of foreign tourists each year.

Sonepur Cattle Fair

5. Makar Sankranti Mela

The Makar Sankranti Mela is held every year at Rajgir (a town in Bihar) in the month of January. The devotees make flower offering to the deities in the temple and take a dip in the holy water. Another site associated with this festival is the Mandar Hills in the Banka district. According to legends, a great Asura once threatened the gods. The Lord Vishnu cut off the Asura’s head and piled up the body under the weight of the Mandar hill. The famous panchjanya – the sankh (conch shell) used in the Mahabharat war is believed to have been found here on the hills. This makes it a rather famous festival of the state.

Makar Sakranti Mela

6. Pitrapaksha Mela

This mela is held in Gaya each year, in the month of September. In this fair, people from all parts of the country come to worship their ancestors as part of the Shraddha ritual. The gayalis, descendants of the Magga Brahmans perform the Shraddha ceremony. This is a mandatory Hindu ritual which is believed to bring salvation to the departed soul. This tradition traces back to Buddha, who is believed to have performed the first pindan here.

Pitrapaksha Mela

7. Rajgir Mahotsav

Rajgir is the ancient capital of the Magadhan Empire in Bihar and is held sacred by both Jains and Buddhists because of its long association with Buddha and Mahavira. A Rajgir Mahotsav is held every year by the Department of Tourism, Bihar. It is a colourful festival of dance and music. A complete serene atmosphere is created here with the instrumental music, devotional songs, opera, folk dance, ballet and other dance and art forms. This festival held in the last week of October attracts a large number of tourists from around the world.

Rajgir Mahotsav

The Bihula festival is mainly prominent in the Bhagalpur district of Bihar. This festival is rather famous in the Eastern Bihar and has various myths associated with it. People pray to the Goddess Mansa to protect their families. This festival is held during the month of August each year. The festival celebrates the brilliant Manjusha Art, which is as magnificent as other art forms found in Bihar.

Bihula

9. Buddha Jayanti

The Buddha Jayanti is celebrated during the month of May, on the Baisakh Purnima (full moon day). It is believed that Buddha was born, enlightened and passed away on the same full moon day. Thus, the festival Buddha Jayanti came to be celebrated. This is especially celebrated in the town Bodh Gaya and Rajgir. This day marks the day of prayer and celebration at the Mahabodhi Temple.

Buddha Jayanti_Festivals of Bihar

This just shows how great the culture of Bihar really is. Be sure to witness these festivals at least once in your lifetime.

This post was published by Roli Sharaf

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Indian culture and tradition essay for students and children.

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500+ Words Essay on Indian Culture and Tradition

India has a rich culture and that has become our identity. Be it in religion, art, intellectual achievements, or performing arts, it has made us a colorful, rich, and diverse nation. The Indian culture and tradition essay is a guideline to the vibrant cultures and traditions followed in India. 

Indian Culture And Tradition Essay

India was home to many invasions and thus it only added to the present variety. Today, India stands as a powerful and multi-cultured society as it has absorbed many cultures and moved on. People here have followed various religion , traditions, and customs.

Although people are turning modern today, hold on to the moral values and celebrates the festivals according to customs. So, we are still living and learning epic lessons from Ramayana and Mahabharata. Also, people still throng Gurudwaras, temples, churches, and mosques. 

The culture in India is everything from people’s living, rituals, values, beliefs, habits, care, knowledge, etc. Also, India is considered as the oldest civilization where people still follows their old habits of care and humanity.

Additionally, culture is a way through which we behave with others, how softly we react to different things, our understanding of ethics, values, and beliefs.

People from the old generation pass their beliefs and cultures to the upcoming generation. Thus, every child that behaves well with others has already learned about their culture from grandparents and parents.

Also, here we can see culture in everything like fashion , music , dance , social norms, foods, etc. Thus, India is one big melting pot for having behaviors and beliefs which gave birth to different cultures. 

Get the huge list of more than 500 Essay Topics and Ideas

Indian Culture and Religion

There are many religions that have found their origin in age-old methods that are five thousand years old. Also, it is considered because Hinduism was originated from Vedas.

Thus, all the Hindu scriptures that are considered holy have been scripted in the Sanskrit language. Also, it is believed that Jainism has ancient origin and existence in the Indus valley. Buddhism is the other religion that was originated in the country through the teachings of Gautam Buddha. 

There are many different eras that have come and gone but no era was very powerful to change the influence of the real culture. So, the culture of younger generations is still connected to the older generations. Also, our ethnic culture always teaches us to respect elders, behave well, care for helpless people, and help needy and poor people.

Additionally, there is a great culture in our country that we should always welcome guest like gods. That is why we have a famous saying like ‘Atithi Devo Bhava’. So, the basic roots in our culture are spiritual practices and humanity. 

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Bihar Culture and Tradition

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How bihar’s rich cultural heritage shaped india’s history and identity.

Bihar Culture and Tradition :- Bihar, a state in the heart of India, is a treasure trove of cultural diversity and rich traditions that have evolved over the centuries. This land of vibrant customs has been profoundly influenced by its neighboring states, including Nepal, Jharkhand, Uttar Pradesh, and West Bengal, resulting in a tapestry of traditions that are uniquely Bihar’s own.

Bihar: The Land of Legends, where Goddesses, Warriors, and Enlightened Ones were Born

essay on culture and tradition of bihar

The cultural and historical significance of Bihar can be traced back to ancient times . The epic Ramayana finds deep roots in this state. Maharishi Valmiki , the sage who penned the timeless epic, resided in the tranquil surroundings of Bihar. In addition, Mithila, a region in Bihar, is believed to be the birthplace of Devi Maa Sita , the revered consort of Lord Shree Ram and an embodiment of Goddess Maa Lakshmi Devi. This association with the Ramayana endows Bihar with a sacred aura and a profound sense of reverence.

Not only does the Ramayana find its essence in Bihar, but the Mahabharata , another great Hindu epic, also weaves a historical tapestry in the state. Karna , a pivotal character in the Mahabharata, was the noble and generous warrior who ruled over Anga , an ancient kingdom that corresponds to present-day Bihar. Bihar’s connection to these two epics makes it a reservoir of mythological and historical significance.

THE GREAT MAHABHARTA WORRIOR KARAN

However, Bihar is not just about Hindu mythology ; it holds a crucial place in the annals of Buddhism as well. It was in Bodh Gaya, a sacred city in Bihar, that Gautam Buddha attained enlightenment. The Bodhi Tree under which the enlightened one found nirvana has become a pilgrimage site of profound spiritual importance for Buddhists worldwide. Bihar’s contribution to Buddhism is a testament to its cultural diversity and historical significance.

The cultural vibrancy of Bihar is also reflected in its traditional arts, dances, and celebrations. Traditional dances in Bihar are a colorful and exuberant expression of joy. The rhythmic beats and graceful movements encapsulate the spirit of the state’s celebrations. Folk songs, sung with great enthusiasm, add a melodic touch to commemorate significant events and festivals. Whether it’s the exuberance of Chhath Puja or the merriment of Holi , Bihar’s celebrations are a sight to behold.

Bihar’s traditional attire is a testament to the artistic and creative spirit of its people. Madhubani paintings , with their intricate patterns and vibrant colors, adorn walls and hangings, telling stories of folklore and mythology. Stone pottery, known for its durability and craftsmanship, is a cherished art form in Bihar. The state’s expertise in leather goods and applique work is also widely recognized, making these traditional crafts a source of pride for the people.

In essence, Bihar’s culture and traditions are a captivating blend of history, mythology, and artistry. The state’s association with the Ramayana, the Mahabharata, and Buddhism adds layers of spiritual and historical significance. Its traditional dances and folk songs infuse life and energy into celebrations, creating a cultural mosaic that is both diverse and enchanting. The artistic expressions in the form of Madhubani paintings, stone pottery, leather goods, and applique work further enrich the cultural heritage of Bihar.

This state’s legacy is not merely a testament to its past; it is a living, breathing cultural tapestry that continues to evolve and thrive in the present. Bihar’s culture and traditions stand as a testament to the resilience, creativity, and spirituality of its people, making it a unique and invaluable part of India’s diverse cultural landscape.

Madhubani Paintings

Exploring the Rich Tapestry of Bihar Culture and Tradition Through the Enchanting Significance of Madhubani Paintings

Madhubani paintings, a captivating form of art originating from the Mithila region spanning India and Nepal, derive their name from the vibrant Madhubani district in Bihar, India, where they first came to life. These exquisite creations are renowned for their striking geometrical patterns, crafted with a diverse array of mediums such as fingers, twigs, brushes, nib-pens, and even humble matchsticks. What sets them apart further is the use of natural dyes and pigments, with the paintings taking shape from a paste made of powdered rice.

Beyond their aesthetic appeal, Madhubani paintings carry profound cultural significance. They serve as a poignant guardian of Indian folk culture and traditions, opening a mesmerizing portal into the rich tapestry of the nation’s past. These art forms not only depict the social structure but also encapsulate the cultural identity of the land. They beautifully encapsulate the values, customs, and traditions of the region, transforming them into vivid visual narratives.

Madhubani paintings draw inspiration from a plethora of themes, encompassing religion, love, fertility, and more. These mesmerizing works of art are more than just aesthetically pleasing; they are a cultural mirror reflecting the essence of India’s diverse heritage. Natural elements like the sun, moon, and sacred plants such as tulsi often find their place within the canvas. They also depict scenes from the royal courts and social events, offering a glimpse into the vivid tapestry of Indian life, from weddings to celebrations.

The significance of Madhubani paintings extends beyond the canvas. These artworks hold ritual importance, finding their place during specific life events like births and marriages, as well as festive occasions such as Holi, Surya Shasti, Kali Puja, Upanayana, and Durga Puja. The symbols within these paintings predominantly revolve around people and their harmonious connection with nature, intertwining seamlessly with scenes and deities from ancient epics. The artistry encompasses a spectrum of motifs that seamlessly blend tradition with a contemporary narrative.

Madhubani paintings, with their timeless charm and cultural relevance, are a testament to the enduring spirit of Bihar’s artistic traditions. In harmony with other traditional crafts like wall hangings, stone pottery, leather goods, and applique work, they enrich the cultural heritage of the region. Each stroke of color and pattern weaves together a vibrant tale, echoing the voices of the past and speaking to the artistic soul of Bihar’s culture and tradition.

“Bihar’s Enduring Cultural Heritage: Dance, Music, and the Timeless Bidesia Tradition”

Bihar’s culture is a colorful tapestry woven from the threads of various ethnic groups and religions, creating a rich and diverse tradition of dance and music. The artistic expressions in this state reflect daily rural life, common themes, and the soul of the people.

Folk songs, folk dances, and classical music are at the heart of Bihar’s cultural heritage. These art forms are not just performances but windows into the very essence of life in Bihar. They capture the rhythms of the land, the stories of its people, and the traditions that have been passed down through generations.

BIHAR TRADITIONAL DANCE AND MUSIC

Bihar boasts a plethora of folk dances, each with its unique charm and significance. Among them, the Bidesia dance stands out as the most popular. This folk dance originated in the 20th century and has a strong presence in the Bhojpuri-speaking regions of Bihar. Bhikari Thakur, often referred to as the father of this dance style, used dance as a powerful medium to express his views on societal conflicts and issues. Through the graceful movements of Bidesia, he conveyed messages that resonated deeply with the people of Bihar.

In an age where new entertainment modes have emerged, Bidesia continues to hold a special place in the hearts of Biharis. Its enduring charm is a testament to the power of art to connect with people on a profound level, transcending time and trends. The dance not only entertains but also educates, enlightens, and fosters a sense of belonging and identity among the people of Bihar.

Bihar’s cultural richness is a testament to the resilience and creativity of its people. It is a reminder that traditions, whether in the form of folk dances, music, or art, have the power to transcend generations and continue to be a source of pride and joy. As Bihar embraces modernity, it does so with a firm grip on its cultural roots, ensuring that the melodies of the past continue to resonate in the present.

Bihar’s Timeless Traditional Attire: Weaving Culture and Heritage”

The traditional attire of the people in Bihar paints a vivid picture of their rich cultural heritage. For men, the quintessential Bihari outfit consists of the “dhoti-mirjai” or the “kurta.” The “dhoti-mirjai” is a modified version of the flowing jama, while the “kurta” has replaced the older chapkan, a robe traditionally fastened either on the right or the left. It’s not just these, though; Bihari men also embrace the timeless “lungi” and “pajamas” as comfortable alternatives to pair with their “kurta.”

These outfits are often made of cotton and serve as everyday attire for men. However, when special occasions and festivals come around, you’ll see them donning more elaborate and fancier versions of these ensembles. The “dhoti” and “lungi,” in particular, are unique forms of loose pants that gracefully wrap around the legs and are tied at the waist to create that traditional look. They possess an innate charm that complements a wide range of body types, making them a beloved choice among Bihari men.

Traditionally, tying a “dhoti” requires a bit more effort and time compared to slipping into regular pants or pajamas. However, the allure of the “dhoti” lies not just in its aesthetics but in the connection to tradition and culture. In contemporary times, the convenience of ready-made “dhotis” has emerged, coming in a diverse array of designs, color combinations, and patterns, catering to both the admirers of tradition and the seekers of modernity.

On the other hand, Bihari women elegantly drape themselves in sarees, predominantly in the “Seedha Aanchal” style. The saree, a symbol of grace and tradition, is an integral part of a Bihari woman’s wardrobe. The “Seedha Aanchal” style of draping showcases the saree’s beauty with a touch of sophistication.

In Bihar, traditional attire isn’t just about what you wear; it’s a testament to the state’s deep-rooted culture and an expression of the people’s reverence for their heritage. The “dhoti-mirjai,” “kurta,” “saree,” “lungi,” and “pajamas” are more than just garments; they embody the soul of Bihar’s culture, blending the old with the new and the traditional with the contemporary. Whether it’s a regular day or a festive celebration, these attires remain an ever-present link to Bihar’s vibrant cultural tapestry.

Bihar’s Sarees and Men’s Attire: Threads of Tradition and Elegance”

The saree, a timeless and iconic attire, holds a special place in the hearts of women in Bihar. This six to nine-yard wonder is more than just a garment; it’s a symbol of tradition, grace, and cultural heritage. The preferred style of draping in Bihar is the “Seedha Aanchal,” a way of wearing the saree that accentuates its beauty with a touch of sophistication.

For men in Bihar, the traditional dress encompasses the “dhoti-mirjai,” a modernized version of the flowing jama, or the “kurta,” which has gracefully taken the place of the older chapkan, a robe traditionally fastened either on the right or the left. These outfits exude a charm that intertwines tradition with comfort, and they have long been part of the daily attire of Bihari men. However, the winds of change have brought Western shirts and trousers into the lives of both urban and rural men, reflecting the influence of Western culture.

Women’s sarees, on the other hand, have an indelible cultural significance in Bihar. They are more than just clothing; they are an embodiment of grace and elegance. Sarees are reserved for special occasions like weddings, festivals, and other social events, where they become a symbol of beauty and sophistication. When a Bihari woman drapes herself in a saree, it is not merely an ensemble but a representation of the region’s rich cultural heritage, echoing its morals, values, and customs.

The saree also carries a deeper significance, reflecting the social status of women in Bihar. It’s a testament to their elevated stature and the respect they command. Wearing a saree is not just a sartorial choice; it’s an affirmation of tradition, an expression of identity, and a celebration of the cultural tapestry that weaves together Bihar’s rich heritage.

In the midst of evolving fashion trends and the influence of Western attire, the saree stands strong as a symbol of unwavering tradition and a timeless garment that embodies the essence of Bihar’s culture. It’s a piece of history that continues to grace the lives of Bihari women, a reminder of the values and customs that make this state’s heritage truly remarkable.

Bihar's Sarees and Men's Attire ( DHOTI KURTA)

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बिहार की संस्कृति और परंपरा IN HINDI AND TO KNOW MORE ABOUT BIHAR HISTORY

Conclusion of bihar culture and tradition “a cultural kaleidoscope: bihar’s resilience and tradition”.

Bihar’s culture and traditions are a testament to the resilience, creativity, and spirituality of its people. This state, nestled in the heart of India, has woven a tapestry of customs and heritage that have evolved over centuries. Influenced by its neighboring states and deeply rooted in history, Bihar’s cultural legacy is a blend of history, mythology, and artistry. From the epic Ramayana to the Mahabharata, and the profound significance of Buddhism, Bihar’s cultural canvas is diverse and enchanting.

The traditional arts, dances, and celebrations in Bihar bring this culture to life. Folk songs, dances, and classical music capture the rhythms of daily life and the spirit of the people. The timeless Bidesia dance, rooted in societal conflicts and societal views, continues to enthrall and educate.

Bihar’s traditional attire, from the “dhoti-mirjai” to the elegant sarees, reflects the state’s deep-rooted culture and is a living testament to its heritage. These garments embody tradition and comfort, connecting the old with the new.

Madhubani paintings, a captivating art form, are a vivid expression of Bihar’s rich cultural heritage, echoing its values, customs, and traditions through intricate patterns and vibrant colors. They are a living narrative of Bihar’s diverse cultural heritage.

In the midst of changing fashion trends and modern influences, Bihar’s culture remains steadfast. The saree, symbolizing grace and tradition, is more than clothing; it’s an affirmation of tradition, an expression of identity, and a celebration of the rich cultural tapestry that defines Bihar.

 Bihar Culture and Tradition TEMPLE

Summary of Bihar Culture and Tradition

Bihar’s culture and tradition are deeply woven into the fabric of India’s history and identity. With influences from neighboring states, a rich blend of history, mythology, and artistry have shaped Bihar’s unique heritage. The cultural significance of Bihar is anchored in the Ramayana, the Mahabharata, and Buddhism, making it a reservoir of mythological and historical importance.

The state’s vibrancy is mirrored in its traditional arts, dances, and celebrations, offering a glimpse into daily life and historical events. Madhubani paintings, intricate and colorful, embody the culture and traditions of the region, just as stone pottery, leather goods, and applique work contribute to Bihar’s cultural heritage.

Bihar’s traditional attire, including the saree and men’s traditional clothing, represents the state’s rich culture and history. These garments are more than clothing; they are symbols of tradition and identity. While the influences of modernity and Western fashion are apparent, Bihar’s cultural roots remain strong.

In conclusion, Bihar’s culture and tradition are a captivating blend of history, mythology, and artistry that continue to thrive and evolve. They are a testament to the resilience, creativity, and spirituality of its people. Bihar welcomes the modern world while holding onto its rich heritage.

Thank You for Exploring Bihar’s Cultural Heritage with Us!

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Essay: In my Jamaican Mexican household, we make jerk chicken tamales

The author and her mother pose while making tamales

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In 1985 my mom received a phone call from a wrong number. When she picked up she had no idea that the man on the other end would end up being her husband and father of her two daughters. It was that phone call that turned into 33 years of marriage and a household full of culture.

The man on the other end of the call was from Kingston, Jamaica. He migrated to the U.S. by himself when he was 16 years old to attend college. He earned a scholarship to run track at USC, and that’s how he landed in L.A.

My parents are very proud of their cultures. Since I was born they have introduced me to music, traditional dishes and customs from their respective cultures. One night we might eat rice and peas with curry chicken and the next, tacos dorados de papa.

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The holidays are always a special time since there are traditions that have been happening with my family for years. Some of the main traditions involve food and cooking together.

One of the most vivid memories I have during the holidays is making tamales with my mom and sister. The kitchen has always felt like a place of comfort where everyone can congregate and feel at home. We were making our usual holiday tamales a few years ago when my mom ran out of her chicken guisado. She found some leftover jerk chicken and started using it in the tamales.

It was one of the first times I saw my two cultures combined into the same dish.

Jamaican and Mexican food are very different. The way the food is prepared is different, the spices are different and the flavors are not similar. But with these jerk chicken tamales, both of the cultures blended so well.

It made me think about how many parents have built a household where both of their cultures and experiences are equally represented. When my mom made these new tamales, I felt a greater appreciation for my multicultural household and it made me reflect on the obstacles that had to be overcome for it to exist.

It was a wrong phone call that turned into months of long phone conversations. That led to five years of dating in secret because of my mom’s family.

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My mom was the first person in her family to date someone who wasn’t also Latino. My grandparents were not accepting of my Black dad.

My grandparents would make comments about how my mom’s children would look different if she married a Black man and how we would not fit in. Before I was even born, they were already condemning me.

On Thanksgiving Day in 1990, my mom and dad got married. Despite not being supported by some in her family, my mom walked down the aisle in a pink dress and exchanged vows with my dad. Eventually, my grandparents came around and changed their opinions about their relationship.

It was when my mom made jerk chicken tamales that I reflected on how I was raised by two very different cultures that always seemed to coexist so seamlessly at home.

Growing up, I was teased about my hair, the food I took to school and the color of my skin. But being Mexican and Jamaican is one of my superpowers. When I was little and people used to ask what ethnicity I was I would say “JamMexican.”

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With the jerk chicken tamales, I don’t have to choose a side because I have both cultures represented equally.

essay on culture and tradition of bihar

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Guest Essay

Handel’s ‘Messiah’ Teaches Us a Surprising Lesson About Tradition

essay on culture and tradition of bihar

By Matthew Walther

Mr. Walther is the editor of The Lamp, a Catholic literary journal, and a contributing Opinion writer.

The performance of Handel’s “Messiah” during Advent, the period that begins on the fourth Sunday before Christmas and ends on Christmas Eve, is one of those traditions that is delightful precisely because it is so demotic and uncouth.

In some cities “Messiah,” a 53-movement oratorio in three parts composed in 1741, is performed under the auspices of the local symphony orchestra. But elsewhere amateur singers and musicians assemble to perform it in churches, community centers and shopping malls. Some productions are uncompromising three-hour affairs, though extensive cutting is more common. Many versions include only Part 1 and the irrepressible Hallelujah chorus, one of the best known pieces of vocal music.

Even when played by a proper orchestra and chorus, “Messiah” has long been an exercise in crowd-pleasing camp. In the forms in which it is familiar to most audiences today, discerning critics regard it as pure schlock: not a cool, brisk work of modest instrumentation in the Baroque style of Handel’s era, but rather an anachronistic hodgepodge of centuries of accumulated banalities that would have been unrecognizable to its composer — army-size choruses, pointless trombones inserted by unscrupulous Austrians, percussion that could politely be described as “extra” and ponderously slow tempos.

Even performing “Messiah” during Advent can be seen as a mistake. At its premiere in Dublin in 1742 and for many years after, it was rightly associated not with Christmas but with the anticipation of Easter: The bulk of the work concerns Christ’s Passion and glorification in heaven, not his birth.

For these reasons, “Messiah” serves as a kind of test case for how we think about the nature and value of tradition. Does tradition mean attempting to preserve or recover a supposedly purer past? Or does it mean accepting our cultural inheritance as we find it, rough around the edges though it may be? In the case of “Messiah,” at least, the shabbier, less exalted vision of tradition rightly prevails.

Many of the most popular recorded versions of “Messiah” emerged along with the rise of stereo in the 1950s. By that time performers and audiences alike accepted that the orchestration of the oratorio would be tinkered with and that the number of singers would be doubled or tripled or multiplied a hundredfold. The default idiom for Handel’s work was romantic, the proper mood regal rather than somber.

For my money, the best example of this kind of “Messiah” is a recording made by the British conductor Leopold Stokowski in 1966 with the London Symphony Orchestra. Stokowski was an artist incapable of embarrassment, a textually heedless showman known for his contributions to Disney’s musical “Fantasia” and his wonderfully lush orchestral arrangements of piano works such as Debussy’s “Suite Bergamasque.” His “Messiah,” which features only 16 of the work’s movements, is not a sensitive interpretation. Listening to it with my head three feet away from my ancient Dahlquist speakers is the closest thing I can imagine to finding myself in the position of the shepherds in St. Luke’s Gospel, when “the angel of the Lord came upon them, and the glory of the Lord shone round about them: and they were sore afraid.”

But Stokowski’s unsubtle “Messiah” is hardly the most radical version, in terms of its departure from Handel’s score, or the most populist. In 1958 Leonard Bernstein dramatically rearranged the structure of “Messiah” and enlisted the Westminster Choir of Lawrenceville, N.J., for an epic faux-Wagnerian performance. In 1959, Eugene Ormandy recorded a version with the singer William Warfield (perhaps best known for his role in the MGM film version of the musical “Show Boat” in 1951) and the Mormon Tabernacle Choir, a best-selling LP now regarded by music snobs as an embarrassing novelty item.

This list of lovable mistreatments of the oratorio could be multiplied infinitely (as my editor found out the hard way). Despite the marginal status of Baroque music among the midcentury classical music establishment, by the 1960s “Messiah” had become one of the most-recorded works in the repertoire.

But old assumptions about how freely “Messiah” could be interpreted were beginning to change. An example of a stricter understanding of how to perform “Messiah” was the conductor Johannes Somary’s version with the English Chamber Orchestra in 1970. With its smaller ensemble, much faster tempo and marked sense of restraint by vocalists, it reflected the influence of the “historically informed performance” movement, which would shape recordings of a wide variety of classical music in the coming decades.

This movement encouraged a greater fidelity to scores — in their earliest extant versions, not the received tradition of 19th-century orchestration that had survived into the 20th century — as well as the use of so-called period instruments (gut rather than steel strings on bowed instruments, for example). Most characteristically, the movement advocated a style of singing that discouraged vibrato in favor of a clean tone associated, to modern ears, with Oxbridge boys’ choirs.

Performances like Somary’s, audiences were assured, were more authentic, capturing how Handel had meant the work to be performed, free of the corruptions that had accrued over the centuries. “Messiah” was supposed to be a refreshing draft of cold English spring water, not the stuffed German sausage of conductors such as Otto Klemperer. (Though, oddly enough, Klemperer’s gloriously slow Teutonic “Messiah” with the Philharmonia Orchestra in 1965 is one of the few performances of that era and style that remains highly regarded.)

But this purist view was always dubious. It assumes that the correct approach to performing a piece of music can be “unearthed” in a straightforward archaeological sense. This understanding of authenticity — as something that requires discarding a tradition that evolved organically over time — has been influential, and not only in the world of classical music. It is of a piece, for example, with the 1986 edition of the Oxford Shakespeare, whose editors changed the name “Falstaff” to “Oldcastle” in “Henry IV, Part 1,” as its author may well have written in a manuscript that does not, alas, exist. In doing so they made a speculative attempt at recovering “history” but erased one of the most famous literary creations of all time.

Despite its reverence for the music of earlier eras (and its commendable rediscovery of countless works that had not been performed for centuries), the historically informed performance movement can be seen as a fundamentally modern project, one that unwittingly destroys the past — the actual performance tradition handed down to us by generations of conductors and musicians — in the name of reclaiming it.

The movement is also inherently unstable. The consensus of what constitutes fidelity to, say, 18th-century musical performance is bound to change — as it has in the case of “Messiah.” The best illustration of this problem can be found by comparing one of the most celebrated recordings of “Messiah” from the golden age of the historically informed performance movement — Christopher Hogwood’s version with the Academy of Ancient Music in 1980 — with a period recording from two and half decades later: John Butt’s recording with Dunedin Consort and Players from 2006.

While both conductors adopt tempos that sound brisk in comparison with Stokowski and Klemperer, the Butt version is much slower than the Hogwood one. Then there is the singing. The glory of the Hogwood recording is the vibrato-less voice of the soprano Emma Kirkby: icily, even glacially cold, without sounding harsh; an almost Platonic ideal of pure tonality liberated by the gods from mere sublunary human vocalization; the music of the spheres (you get the idea). But Ms. Kirkby’s once “authentic” absence of vibrato is now deemed ahistoric. From an ideological (as opposed to aesthetic) standpoint, she is currently “wrong,” performing Handel as if she were singing a Thomas Tallis motet in the 16th century. But the hard truth is that she continues to sound wonderful.

Fortunately, Handel’s “Messiah” is so popular that the ideological fashions of critics and performers cannot contain it. The work continues to be gleefully performed very much as it was in the days of Stokowski, even as the Handel and Haydn Society solemnly persists in its commitment to small ensembles, period instruments and other trappings of historical accuracy.

I own a ridiculously large number of recordings of “Messiah” and enjoy all of them for wildly different reasons. Though I am known to make disparaging remarks about Baroque specialists sounding like English boys’ choirs, I am exceedingly fond of a version of “Messiah” that actually features one, conducted by Edward Higginbottom. Somewhere I even have a copy of “Young Messiah,” a ludicrous, synthesizer-laden experiment from 1979 that probably deserves its present obscurity.

This seemingly inexhaustible variety of interpretations is possible because “Messiah” is sui generis: an unclassifiable hybrid of sacred art and theatrical revelry that cannot be subsumed neatly into any given school of performance, idiom or national tradition. This is why “Messiah” has succeeded in such a wide array of cultural contexts, including the TV special “It’s Christmastime Again, Charlie Brown” (1992), in which Marcie and Peppermint Patty attend a performance that sounds remarkably similar to the Stokowski version, as well as the Japanese animated TV series “Neon Genesis Evangelion” (from 1995 to 1996), in which the Somary recording plays over images of a teenage girl thrusting the spear of Longinus into a monstrous alien being.

“Messiah” is now the common property of the entire human race: a jewel in the crown of the Anglican cultural tradition that has become not only the source of recessional hymns for Catholics but also an indelible symbol of Christmas for millions of non-Christians. In the words of the oratorio’s first chorus, taken from the Book of Isaiah: “All flesh shall see it together: for the mouth of the Lord hath spoken it.”

The Times is committed to publishing a diversity of letters to the editor. We’d like to hear what you think about this or any of our articles. Here are some tips . And here’s our email: [email protected] .

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Matthew Walther ( @matthewwalther ) is a contributing Opinion writer for The New York Times. He is the editor of The Lamp, a Catholic literary journal, and a media fellow at the Institute for Human Ecology at the Catholic University of America.

essay on culture and tradition of bihar

1 Culture of Indian States Image - Pixahive Bihar and its cultural significance are as old as civilization itself. Bihar was once a hub of the richest and the most diverse ethnicity. The epics Ramayana and Mahabharata, and Buddhism, all have had a crucial role in building the rich culture of Bihar.

ADVERTISEMENT Bihar has experienced various invasions from different dynasties. Two of India's most glorious dynasties, Mauryas (321 -185 BCE) and Guptas (320 to 550 CE) flourished in the ancient Bihar region which was then known as Magadh.

Bihar is a large state of India covering approximately 94,163 square kilometres. The Culture of Bihar, language, customs, and traditions change from region to region. But, the people have embraced the customs and traditions of each other and celebrate each other's festivals and beliefs and together live in harmony. Take Free BPSC Mock Test

v t e Bihari culture refers to the culture of the Indian state of Bihar. Bihari culture includes Angika culture, Mithila culture, Bhojpuri Culture and the culture of Magadha . bihar is culturally divided in to magadh, mithila and bhojpur region. Language and literature Language and script

CULTURE. It is believed that Bihar is one of the oldest inhabited place in the country and the third largest state in India. Bihar is valued highly with rich culture and heritage and is home to many native art forms. The culture of the Biharis is greatly influenced by the pilgrimage centers of this area which includes almost all religions.

Biharians.com May 24, 2023 Introduction Bihar is a beautiful state in eastern India, with a rich history and a unique culture that sets it apart. The people of Bihar are known for their warmth, hospitality, and love for food.

The major cities in Bihar are Patna, Gaya, Bhagalpur, Muzaffarpur, Darbhanga, Munger, and Bihar Sharif. Bihar, state of eastern India. Bihar occupied an important position in the early history of India. For centuries it was the principal seat of imperial powers and the main focus of Indian culture and civilization. Its capital is Patna.

Women wear Salwar kameez as it was one of the traditional dresses of Bihar. Festivals like Chhath Puja have a very emotional connection with the people of Bihar. 6. Bihar Culture Dress. The most preferable and traditional dress in Bihar is dhoti-kurta for men and saree for women. The clothing style in Bihar is the mirror of its culture and ...

Celebrate Diversity and Embrace Tradition with Culture of Bihar Bihar's culture is a vibrant mosaic of traditions, art forms, and religious practices. With captivating folk dances like Jhumar and Jat-Jatin, and historical gems like Nalanda, Bihar proudly displays its rich heritage and enduring cultural values.

1. Buddhist Circuit tour, Bihar 2. Sikh Circuit, Bihar 3. Sufi Circuit, Bihar 4. Jain Circuit, Bihar 5. Ramayan Circuit, Bihar 6. Meditation Tour, Bodhgaya Cultural Experiences of Bihar 1. Festivals of Bihar 2. Language of Bihar 3. Cuisine in Bihar 4. Bihar Folk Dance and Music 5. Paintings and Craft in Bihar Things to Do Around the World

Essay on Bihar:Bihar is the state located in the eastern part of India. It is nestled around Nepal, Uttar Pradesh, West Bengal and Jharkhand. It has a sub-tropical climate experiencing hot summers and cold winters. Agriculture is the main occupation in Bihar.

Bihar, a state in eastern India, is entrenched in thousands of years of history, customs, and culture. Bihar has a rich and diverse legacy, which is represented in its art, music, food, and festivals, dating back to the ancient kingdoms of Magadha and Maurya. Because of the growth of e-commerce, it is now feasible to order these traditional handicrafts and home decor items online and have them ...

9. Traditional Games and Sports: Bihar has a rich tradition of traditional games and sports. Kabaddi, Gilli Danda, and Kho-Kho are popular outdoor games enjoyed by people of all ages. The state also has a strong tradition of wrestling, with local "Akhadas" nurturing young talents and preserving this ancient sport.

Overview Test Series Bihar's Culture: Overview The traditional Bihar society has a vibrant cultural life that includes art, dancing, music, festivals, and fairs. The rich tradition of the Bihari people has been preserved. Bihar's traditional dances are quite entertaining. People sing folk songs to remember some of the significant events.

Essay on Bihar in English. Bihar is a state in eastern India that has a rich cultural and historical heritage. It is known for its ancient sites, unique handicrafts, and rich literature. The state is also famous for producing some of the greatest scholars, poets, and philosophers of India, such as Aryabhatta, Chanakya, and Vidyapati.

Bihar Culture. Rich in diversity, Bihari culture is a neat mosaic of three major religions - Hinduism, Buddhism and Jainism - that had defined its literature, arts and crafts, cuisine, architecture and festivals. Gautam Buddha attained enlightenment at Bodh Gaya, a town in the Gaya district that gave rise to Buddhism which spread across the ...

History Bihar has a rich history. It was the center of power, learning, and culture in ancient India. It is the birthplace of Buddhism. Culture Bihar's culture is very diverse. It is known for its music, dance, and festivals. Bihari cuisine is also very famous. Economy Bihar's economy is primarily agricultural.

It is both the commercial and the staple crop, and daal-bhaat ( daal and rice) is the most commonly eaten food in Bihar. Speaking of distinctive features, Bihari culinary techniques involve a great deal of deep-frying, roasting ( bhoonna) and steaming. Mustard oil is the preferred cooking base, though vegetable oils are also used.

Bihar has a rich cultural heritage. The predominant themes are from the myths and legends of Hinduism. The Hindu deities, Lord Rama and His consort, Seeta, and Lord Shiva and His consort, Parvati, form the main theme of folk paintings. Bihar, a land of many Buddhist Monasteries is also known as 'The Land of Buddha'.

1 Essay On Culture And Tradition Of Bihar. The Biharis celebrates the festival of Chaath dedicated to Sun God with major pomp and it usually begins on the fourth day of the month of Kartik Shukhla Paksha which falls either in the month of October or November. Some of their main crops include rice, wheat, lentils, maize corn and sugar cane along ...

Bihar Articles 9 Colourful Festivals and F... India is a land of varied culture, festivals, beliefs and religions. Whichever part of the country you visit, you will come across some culture that will be completely different from your own. It is simply amazing how one country houses so many diversified religions.

500+ Words Essay on Indian Culture and Tradition. India has a rich culture and that has become our identity. Be it in religion, art, intellectual achievements, or performing arts, it has made us a colorful, rich, and diverse nation. The Indian culture and tradition essay is a guideline to the vibrant cultures and traditions followed in India.

Bihar culture and tradition is rich cultural heritage, rooted in Hindu mythology, Buddhism, and the Mauryan dynasty, the birthplace of Karna.

It was that phone call that turned into 33 years of marriage and a household full of culture. The man on the other end of the call was from Kingston, Jamaica. He migrated to the U.S. by himself ...

Handel's 'Messiah' Teaches Us a Surprising Lesson About Tradition. Dec. 23, 2023. Pierre Buttin. By Matthew Walther. Mr. Walther is the editor of The Lamp, a Catholic literary journal, and a ...

Screen Rant

Harry potter: every boggart change (what the characters are scared of).

Boggarts were shapeshifters from Harry Potter that took the form of a victim's fear. Here's what form the Boggarts took with various characters.

Boggarts had a prominent place within the mythology of the Harry Potter series when it came to the connection between magic and fear. The amortal non-being was first introduced in the books by J.K. Rowling before it made its way to the live-action film adaptations. Here's a breakdown of a Boggart and what form it took for certain characters.

In the Harry Potter world, a Boggart was a shapeshifter that took the form of the victim's worst fear. In British mythology, Boggarts were described as house-elves or malevolent spirits. Elsewhere, Boggarts more closely matched something like a boogeyman in popular culture. The non-beings in Harry Potter were known to hide in dark enclosed places.

Related:  Harry Potter Theory: Draco Malfoy Was A Werewolf

Since Boggarts focused on a person's worst fear, defending against them was a priority for Defense Against the Dark Arts class. The Riddikulus charm was the primary spell used to fight off a Boggart. The spell would transform the fear into something weak and comical. It was also taught to gather multiple people to approach a Boggart so the shapeshifter wouldn't know who to target. A handful of characters had their Boggarts on display in the Harry Potter books and movies.

Harry Potter

During his third year at Hogwarts, Harry and his classmates were taught how to defend against Boggarts. Professor Remus Lupin, in charge of Defense Against the Dark Arts at the time, worried that Harry's fear would take the shape of Lord Voldemort. In actuality, Harry's Boggart was a Dementor , meaning he feared fear itself. When Harry encountered the Boggart in the Triwizard Tournament a year later, he used a Patronus Charm against the shapeshifter.

Hermione Granger

Hermione's Boggart wasn't included in the film series but it was revealed during the book, Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban . Her version of the Boggart was Professor McGonagall telling her that she was a failure. The Riddikulus spell used to banish the Boggart was unclear.

Ron Weasley

Ron's Boggart was featured in the books as well as the movies. The Boggart took the form of a giant spider. In the book, Ron used the Riddikulus spell to take away the spider's legs. The movie took a more amusing approach as the defense spell gave the spider roller skates and it slid all over the classroom floor.

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The Boggarts Of Fellow Hogwarts Students

Neville Longbottom:  The Boggart was Severus Snape and the defense spell put the figure in Neville's grandmother's clothes.

Dean Thomas: In the books, Dean's Boggart was a disembodies living hand that was stopped after he trapped it in a mousetrap.

Parvati Patil: Parvati's Boggart was a mummy in the books that tipped over its own bandages, but it was omitted from the movies.

Padma Patil: The movies featured a giant cobra as Padma's Boggart and she used the Riddikulus spell to turn it into a jack-in-the-box.

Seamus Finnigan: Seamus' Boggwart was a banshee in the books and he used the defense spell so it would lose its voice.

The Boggarts Of Other Harry Potter Characters

Albus Dumbledore: Albus' Boggart, a corpse of his sister Arianna, was revealed by Rowling, but the Riddikulus was unknown.

Molly Weasley: In the book series, a Boggart appeared at 12 Grimmauld Place and in Molly's eyes, it turned into the dead bodies of her family and friends.

Remus Lupin: Seeing as Remus was a werewolf, his Boggart turned into a full moon and he used the Riddikulus charm to turn it into a deflating balloon.

Tom Riddle: According to Rowling, Tom's Boggart was his own dead body.

Newt Scamander: In the Harry Potter spinoff, Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald , Newt's Boggart was revealed as a desk job, and Dumbledore taught him the Riddikulus spell to transform it into a mechanical dragon.

Next:  Why JK Rowling Could Never Kill Off Hagrid In Harry Potter

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Fantastic beasts: the secrets of dumbledore.

Překlad "boggart" do čeština

Boggart je překlad "boggart“ do čeština. Ukázka přeložené věty: If it is anything less than a Boggart, we are on our way. ↔ Pokud bude stvůra menší než Boggart, půjdeme za chvíli dál.

Alternative spelling of boggard. [..]

angličtino - čeština slovník

If it is anything less than a Boggart , we are on our way.

Pokud bude stvůra menší než Boggart , půjdeme za chvíli dál.

Zobrazit algoritmicky generované překlady

Automatické překlady " boggart " do čeština

Překlady "boggart" do čeština v kontextu, překladová paměť.

10 Popular Harry Potter Characters and Their Boggarts, Ranked

A character's Boggart can say a lot about them. Here are the most telling Boggart forms in Harry Potter and what they reveal about each character.

Quick Links

  • Ron Weasley's Greatest Fear Is Self-Explanatory
  • Voldemort's Boggart Aligns With His Actions Throughout the Series
  • Remus Lupin's Boggart Reflects His Tragic Condition
  • Albus Dumbledore's Fear Is a Reminder of His Biggest Regret
  • Molly Weasley's Boggart Hints at Her Heartbreaking Backstory
  • Leta Lestrange's Boggart Reveals Her Secret Guilt
  • Neville Longbottom's Fear Is Darker Than It Seems
  • Newt Scamander's Fear Is Among the Strangest
  • Harry Potter's Boggart Is Deceptively Complicated
  • Hermione Granger's Fear Exposes Her Deepest Insecurities

It's important to remember the ongoing controversial statements by the creator of the Harry Potter franchise. CBR supports the hard work of industry professionals on properties fans know and love, and the wider world of Harry Potter that fans have adopted as their own. You can find CBR's continuing coverage on Rowling here .

One of the most intriguing creatures in the Wizarding World of Harry Potter is the Boggart, a shapeshifter that takes the form of whatever a person fears most. Much like Hogwarts houses, wands and full-bodied Patronus charms, the form a character's Boggart takes can say a lot about them.

From spiders and snakes to corpses and memories, Boggarts can transform into all sorts of things and even people, representing fears that are straightforward or more complex. Harry Potter 's most popular characters have some unusual Boggart forms, but some are more revealing than others. Here they are ranked by how much they tell audiences about each character.

Find Out How CBR Ranked Every Harry Potter Movie

10 Ron Weasley's Greatest Fear Is Self-Explanatory

Boggart form: a giant spider.

Ron Weasley's fear of spiders might just be one of his most relatable traits. As such, it was no surprise in Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban when Ron faced the Boggart, and it transformed into a giant spider. While other Boggarts may be more metaphorical, the reason behind Ron's arachnophobia is pretty simple.

As Ron explains in the Chamber of Secrets novel, when he was three years old, his brother Fred accidentally turned his teddy bear into a large spider. Ron was scarred by the incident and has been deeply afraid of spiders ever since. Even so, Ron still went into an Acromantula nest with Harry to help Hagrid clear his name, confirming he truly belonged in Gryffindor.

9 Voldemort's Boggart Aligns With His Actions Throughout the Series

Boggart form: his own corpse.

Read More About Voldemort's Horcruxes

Although Voldemort never faces a Boggart in the Harry Potter series, author J.K. Rowling did suggest a possible form it could take if he had during a Q&A session with fans. The writer explained that Voldemort's greatest fear is death, specifically his own, so a Boggart might represent this by transforming into his dead body.

Voldemort's Boggart form isn't particularly surprising, considering his big plan to create seven Horcruxes was all about keeping himself alive forever. Such efforts proved futile in the end, as Harry and his friends managed to destroy all of his Horcruxes. To put the final nail in the coffin, Voldemort met his end when his own killing curse backfired.

8 Remus Lupin's Boggart Reflects His Tragic Condition

Boggart form: the full moon.

Students got a glimpse of Professor Remus Lupin's fear when he prevented Harry from facing the Boggart. As he did so, the Boggart transformed into a full moon , hinting at his secret condition as a werewolf before Hermione revealed this information later in Prisoner of Azkaban .

Lupin's Boggart speaks to the tragedy of his condition. Having been bitten as a boy, Lupin lived in constant fear that his condition would be discovered and that he'd hurt people, particularly his close friends and loved ones, during his monthly transformations. When his condition was revealed, Lupin often faced discrimination for something that was completely out of his control.

7 Albus Dumbledore's Fear Is a Reminder of His Biggest Regret

Boggart form: ariana dumbledore's corpse.

Although Headmaster Albus Dumbledore doesn't face any Boggarts in the Harry Potter series, Rowling revealed what form it would've taken if he had during another Q&A session. According to the author, Dumbledore's Boggart would be the corpse of his sister, Ariana.

Dumbledore's fear stems from the fact that he blamed himself for Ariana's death, which occurred when she was hit by a rogue curse during a three-way duel between himself, his brother Aberforth and his love interest Gellert Grindelwald. In fact, Dumbledore's regret eventually doomed him when he put on Marvolo Gaunt's ring, one of Voldemort's Horcruxes which held the Resurrection Stone, as he hoped it would show him his sister again.

6 Molly Weasley's Boggart Hints at Her Heartbreaking Backstory

Boggart form: her family's corpses.

The Weasleys and Every Other Magical Family in Harry Potter

In the Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix novel, Mrs. Weasley had a nasty encounter with a Boggart at 12 Grimmauld Place. It transformed into the corpses of her family, including Harry, switching from person to person every time she tried to cast a spell. Such a sight would shake anyone, but it's even more gut-wrenching when taking Molly's backstory into account.

Molly had two brothers, Fabian and Gideon , who were in the Order of the Phoenix during the First Wizarding War. Sadly, they were both killed by Death Eaters. With the Second Wizarding War just beginning, Molly had every right to fear for her family's safety.

5 Leta Lestrange's Boggart Reveals Her Secret Guilt

Boggart form: corvus lestrange v drowning.

Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald had young Leta Lestrange face her Boggart. It took the form of a painful memory: her baby brother's death. The sight of the blanket unfurling as the baby sank into the water haunted Leta due to the part she played in Corvus Lestrange's untimely demise, having switched him with another infant just before it happened.

Leta's Boggart shows how deeply this moment affected her, having lived with this secret since she was a child. Even when she fought against Grindelwald and his followers, allowing others to see the good in her, Leta had trouble seeing it herself because of this mistake. She spent the rest of her life blaming herself for her brother's death.

4 Neville Longbottom's Fear Is Darker Than It Seems

Boggart form: severus snape.

Like his classmates, audiences probably found it more amusing than scary that Neville Longbottom's greatest fear was Professor Severus Snape in Prisoner of Azkaban . This may have seemed like the silly fear of a child on the surface, but its implications are rather depressing.

Although it's not unusual for children to fear or disparage teachers they don't like, Snape was actually one of Neville's main tormentors in the Harry Potter books, so Neville's fear wasn't unfounded. Some have even theorized that Snape hated Neville because he was the other potential Chosen One in the prophecy. If Voldemort had gone after him instead of Harry, Snape's love, Lily Potter, might've lived.

3 Newt Scamander's Fear Is Among the Strangest

Boggart form: a desk.

Find Out More About the Biggest Magical Creatures That Fascinated Newt Scamander

Alongside Leta, The Crimes of Grindelwald also showed a young Newt Scamander facing his Boggart under the guidance of Professor Dumbledore, who was amused when the Boggart turned into an ordinary desk. Newt explained that his fear was having to work in an office before turning the boggart into a dragon made of office supplies.

While Newt's explanation may seem straightforward and even silly to some, it speaks to Newt's desire to stay true to himself and what he believes rather than conform to what others want him to be. When his brother Theseus tries to get him to work at the Ministry, Newt flat-out refuses. Despite Theseus's good intentions, Newt won't support an organization he doesn't agree with.

2 Harry Potter's Boggart Is Deceptively Complicated

Boggart form: dementor.

Harry Potter learned about Boggarts in Professor Lupin's class in Prisoner of Azkaban . While Lupin thought it would take the form of Lord Voldemort, it instead became a Dementor. As Harry and Lupin discussed it later, Lupin suspected that Harry's true fear wasn't the Dementor but fear itself.

When Harry first encounters a Dementor on the Hogwarts Express, he experiences all of the usual effects and also hears his mother screaming and fainting. Although there was nothing he could've done to save her or his father, Harry always felt responsible for keeping his remaining loved ones safe. The Dementor's effects left him feeling helpless to protect himself or others, so it makes sense that Harry would fear this feeling.

1 Hermione Granger's Fear Exposes Her Deepest Insecurities

Boggart form: minerva mcgonagall telling her she failed.

As revealed in the Prisoner of Azkaban book, Hermione Granger's Boggart took the form of Professor McGonagall telling her she failed all her exams. Like other more banal Boggart transformations, this might seem like a silly thing for Hermione to fear, but it reveals a lot about her insecurities.

Hermione is a Muggle-born witch and often feels the need to prove that she belongs in the Wizarding World. Hearing from McGonagall, someone she looks up to, that she failed would jeopardize her place at Hogwarts and, by extension, the magical world. With this in mind, it's not hard to understand why Hermione considered expulsion to be a fate worse than death in Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone .

Harry Potter

The Harry Potter franchise follows the adventure of a young boy introduced a whole new world of magic, mayhem and darkness. Traversing the obstacles in his path, young Harry's rise to heroics pits him against Lord Voldemort, one of the most dangerous wizards in the world and all his minions.

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  1. Boggart -In English folklore, a boggart (or bogart) is a household

    boggart po polsku

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    boggart po polsku

  3. Boggart -In English folklore, a boggart (or bogart) is a household

    boggart po polsku

  4. ArtStation

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  5. Boggart

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  6. Terrifying Transformations

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VIDEO

  1. Survival Horror Based On Slavic Myths like Kolobok, Boggart and Leshy || Self-Delusion || Gameplay

  2. Boggart Hole Clough Fisheries

  3. i like niy,o po ito please 🥺

  4. Bewitch: Boggart

  5. Tyr

  6. Apparently my Boggart is a Clown

COMMENTS

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  3. Bogart

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  4. Boggart

    Translations in context of "Boggart" in English-Polish from Reverso Context: In Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, Molly Weasley's Boggart is shown to change from Arthur and other family members before going to Harry.

  5. Boggart

    Species information Eye colour Varies Skin colour Varies Hair colour Varies Related to Bogeyman (possibly) Native to Worldwide Alternative names Bogeyman (potentially) Boggle Mortality Amortal Distinction Transformed into the worst fear of the nearest observer (s) Affiliation Dark Arts Ministry of Magic Classification Non-being Status Extant

  6. Boggart

    A boggart is a supernatural being from English folklore.The dialectologist Elizabeth Wright described it as 'a generic name for an apparition'; folklorist Simon Young defines it as 'any ambivalent or evil solitary supernatural spirit'. Halifax folklorist Kai Roberts states that boggart 'might have been used to refer to anything from a hilltop hobgoblin to a household faerie, from a headless ...

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  8. → Boggart, tłumaczenie na polski, przykładowe zdania

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  9. Boggart

    on Aug 10th 2015 A Boggart is a shape-shifting creature that will assume the form of whatever most frightens the person who encounters it. Nobody knows what a Boggart looks like if nobody is there to see it, although it continues to exist, usually giving evidence of its presence by rattling, shaking or scratching the object in which it is hiding.

  10. Muggles' Guide to Harry Potter/Magic/Boggart

    3 Analysis 4 Questions 5 Greater Picture Overview [] A boggart is a shapeshifter that usually lurks in dark spaces. It has no definite form, taking the shape of that which is most feared by the person who encounters it. When not in the sight of a person, it is believed to look like a dark blob. Extended Description

  11. Boggart

    Boggart (also called a bogey, bogeyman, bogle or bugbear) is a term used for a creature in English folklore. It is generally a household spirit turned malevolent trickster or mishcevious goblin-like creature. The name is derived from the Welsh "bwg". When a hobgoblin is teased or misused excessively, it will become a Boggart — creatures whose sole existence is to play tricks and cause ...

  12. Boggart

    Professor Lupin encourages his third year Defence Against the Dark Arts students to confront their darkest fears, with the help of the magical, shape-shiftin...

  13. Boggart in Harry Potter Explained

    The Boggart in question had earlier entered a wardrobe in the staffroom the previous day. Professor Lupin explained the ways of tackling the Boggart to the students and made them recite the incantation Riddikulus several times before facing the Boggart. Neville Longbottom was the first to face the Boggart. It took the form of Severus Snape.

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  15. Harry Potter: What Are The Main Characters' Boggarts?

    Much of what is known about the characters' Boggarts comes from the video game, LEGO Harry Potter: Years 1-4. In this game, it becomes clear that Draco Malfoy's Boggart is Lord Voldemort. Draco's fear of Voldemort likely comes from different reasons than others have. Most fear Voldemort taking over the world. Draco fears Voldemort intimidating ...

  16. Harry Potter: Every Boggart Change (What The Characters Are Scared Of)

    In the Harry Potter world, a Boggart was a shapeshifter that took the form of the victim's worst fear. In British mythology, Boggarts were described as house-elves or malevolent spirits. Elsewhere, Boggarts more closely matched something like a boogeyman in popular culture. The non-beings in Harry Potter were known to hide in dark enclosed places.

  17. Překlad 'boggart'

    Boggart je překlad "boggart" do čeština. Ukázka přeložené věty: If it is anything less than a Boggart, we are on our way. ↔ Pokud bude stvůra menší než Boggart, půjdeme za chvíli dál. boggart noun gramatika Alternative spelling of boggard. [..] + Přidat překlad angličtino - čeština slovník Boggart

  18. 10 Popular Harry Potter Characters and Their Boggarts, Ranked

    Cast. Daniel Radcliffe , Rupert Grint , Emma Watson , Maggie Smith , Alan Rickman , Helena Bonham Carter , Ralph Fiennes , Michael Gambon. Where to watch. HBO Max. A character's Boggart can say a lot about them. Here are the most telling Boggart forms in Harry Potter and what they reveal about each character.

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  20. What is Boggart?

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  21. boggart in Italian

    The next year, the boggart demanded whatever was below ground, but again the farmer got the better of him. L'anno seguente, il boggart pretese tutto quello che cresceva sotto terra, ma anche stavolta il fattore ebbe la meglio. Literature. Some of them are tricksy boggarts.

  22. BOGGART

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