DESTINATION FOX HARBR Alloy Yachts

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A Summary of Sailing Yacht DESTINATION FOX HARB'R

The large luxury yacht DESTINATION FOX HARB'R is a sailing yacht. This 41 metre (135 ft) luxury yacht was made by Alloy Yachts in 2002. DESTINATION FOX HARB'R was previously called Harlequin. Superyacht DESTINATION FOX HARB'R is a stylish yacht that can accommodate a total of 8 people on board and has a total of 6 crew. Launched to celebration in the year of 2002 the comparatively recent interior design and decor showcases the talents emanating from the boards of Redman Whiteley Dixon.

DESTINATION FOX HARB'R underwent extensive tank and wind-tunnel testing to assist in her design. The result is a yacht of high stability, able to carry a powerful sail wardrobe and deliver superb performance. The yacht was a finalist in the 2002 International Superyacht Design Award.

New Build & Design relating to Luxury Yacht DESTINATION FOX HARB'R

The yacht's wider design collaboration came from Dubois Naval Architects. The professional naval architecture drawings are the creation of Dubois Naval Architects. Sailing Yacht DESTINATION FOX HARB'R received her stylish interior designing from the interior design office of Redman Whiteley Dixon. Built at Alloy Yachts the vessel was fabricated in New Zealand. She was officially launched in Auckland in 2002 before being transferred to the owner. The core hull was built out of aluminium. The sailing yacht superstructure is fabricated predominantly with aluminium. With a beam of 8.7 m / 28.5 feet DESTINATION FOX HARB'R has fairly large internal space. A reasonably deep draught of 4.45m (14.6ft) determines the amount of worldwide harbours she can enter, taking into account their specific depth at low tide. She had refit maintenance and modification completed by 2008.

The Max/Min Speed - Engineering Package On S/Y DESTINATION FOX HARB'R:

This yacht is powered by a sole proven CATERPILLAR main engine(s) and can attain a swift maximum limit speed at 14 knots. The main engine of the DESTINATION FOX HARB'R produces 800 horse power (or 588 kilowatts). Her total HP is 800 HP and her total Kilowatts are 588. For propulsion DESTINATION FOX HARB'R has a single screw propeller. Regarding bow thruster maneuverability she was fitted with Abt / Stern: Abt.

Superyacht DESTINATION FOX HARB'R Has The Following Accommodation:

The large luxury yacht sailing yacht DESTINATION FOX HARB'R is able to accommodate as many as 8 passengers and has 6 professional crew.

A List of the Specifications of the DESTINATION FOX HARB'R:

Miscellaneous yacht details.

Her deck material is predominantly a teak deck.

DESTINATION FOX HARBR Disclaimer:

The luxury yacht DESTINATION FOX HARBR displayed on this page is merely informational and she is not necessarily available for yacht charter or for sale, nor is she represented or marketed in anyway by CharterWorld. This web page and the superyacht information contained herein is not contractual. All yacht specifications and informations are displayed in good faith but CharterWorld does not warrant or assume any legal liability or responsibility for the current accuracy, completeness, validity, or usefulness of any superyacht information and/or images displayed. All boat information is subject to change without prior notice and may not be current.

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"Alloy Yachts built large sailing superyachts and the New Zealand company has won numerous International Yachting Awards and has been placed as a finalist on many occasions."

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Mustang Sally

Motor Yacht

Luxury motor yacht Destination Fox Harb’r Too, built in 2008 by American shipyard Trinity Yachts, is a traditional yet contemporary superyacht with a truly defining interior. With an aluminium hull and superstructure, she features exterior design by Trinity while her interior is the work of Patrick Knowles. This extremely detailed vessel measures 49 metres and can accommodate up to 12 guests.

Motor yacht Destination Fox Harb’r Too is the latest launch from Trinity’s 28-foot-beam series which originated with Zoom Zoom Zoom in 2005. This 2008 model was built for Canadian entrepreneur Ron Joyce who was looking to add a large motor yacht to his already three-strong superyacht fleet. At the time, Trinity Yachts was 80 percent through construction of a yacht by the name of Mustang Sally only for her intended owner to order a larger boat be built and to put the current model up for sale.

Fate would have it that this yacht was exactly what Joyce was looking for. Only small changes were ordered upon purchase, including a new paint scheme, the removal of a large aquarium, conversion of a stateroom into a study, and most importantly, a different name. The name Fox Harb’r is also the name of Joyce’s five-star golf resort in Nova Scotia, the official colour of which the taupe hull also reflects.

Luxury superyacht Destination Fox Harb’r Too boasts an interior comparable to that of a spa, swathed in warm tones and comfortable furnishings. Many of the vessel’s surfaces and materials were chosen with low-maintenance in mind, including forgiving wool-based carpets and no lacquered or mirrored finishes. Her décor is focused on raw textures; a mixture of natural stonework and wood grains that leave little need for artwork.

The main salon is separated from a dining area by a twin-column cabinet and houses a lounge area with audio and visual system and a full wet bar. The underlit table in the dining area makes for interesting dining for up to 12 guests while a spacious galley sits opposite the entry foyer for easy service to the dining area.

On the bridge deck a skylounge acts as the social entertainment centre of the motor yacht, featuring a set of couches, television, five-stool bar and card table in its space on the upper aft deck. There is also access to the swimming platform from the aft deck which has underwater lights for evening swimming.

The crowning sundeck is semi-shaded and hosts a Jacuzzi for up to eight people fully surrounded by sun pads, a wet bar, al fresco dining area, lounges, dayhead and tender/watertoy storage.

Amongst her five cabins are an indulgent master suite with a study convertible into a sixth cabin; three King staterooms; and a twin cabin. All feature their own bathrooms and entertainment systems. Located forward on the main deck, the split-level master suite features a forward bed raised to window level and a downstairs area that can be used as a small office or dressing area. His and hers heads and a private study are also present in the suite. Belowdecks can be found the four guest accommodations that lead off a central foyer.

Featuring a dedicated crew, Destination Fox Harb’r Too is an excellent charter yacht for luxury vacations. The yacht cruises comfortably at 16 knots while her crew of 10 under the direction of Captain Bill Hawes ensure the needs of every guest are met.

Destination Fox Harb’r Too sails the Mediterranean in summer and the Caribbean during the winter charter season. The superyacht is built to ABS and MCA classification standards.

  • Yacht Builder Trinity Yachts No profile available
  • Naval Architect Trinity Yachts No profile available
  • Exterior Designer Geoff Van Aller No profile available
  • Interior Designer Patrick Knowles No profile available

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Power Yacht Destination Fox Harbr Too

Destination Fox Harbr Too Crewed Power Yacht Charter

Power Yacht Destination Fox Harbr Too Overview

161ft Destination Fox Harb'r Too adds a new dimension to the luxury charter market boasting 5 luxurious staterooms plus an adaptable 6th stateroom to accommodate additional guests, or act as a private office, gymnasium, or private lounge area.

Destination Fox Harb'r Too is available for charter in the Caribbean during winter months, and the Mediterranean in summer. The yacht is crewed by 10 professional crew members including a 5-star Chef and three hostesses and a watersports guide to ensure that all of your needs are exceeded.

The split-level owner's suite offers magnificent 180-degree views and hosts dual private en-suite facilities (his with shower, and hers with Jacuzzi tub). Four additional staterooms, featuring 3 King beds, 2 twin sized beds, and one Pullman, are located below decks with equally impressive facilities. The 6th adaptable stateroom adjoins the owner's suite on deck, and features a Queen Bed sleeper sofa, and full en-suite facilities.

The yacht has many areas to relax, including a spacious aft deck which is great for water sports, a covered aft cockpit, two large salons, and sundeck flybridge with sunbeds, Jacozi, bar and dining areas.

The Patrick Knowles Design interior reflects a refreshingly cool style influenced by a European Spa Resort, featuring sophisticated fabrics, hand carved glass and wood work, stonework showcasing Beaumaniere Limestone, River Rock Pebbles and Walnut Travertine, satin nickel accents and a rich millwork palate of Redwood Burl, Lacewood, Marcassa Ebony and Honduran Mahogany.

State of the art electronics include V-SAT constant Wi-Fi internet, Crestron video and audio equipment, flat screen TV's with individual satellite receivers, surround sound, iPod docking stations throughout. The yacht is also environment friendly, equipped with an ozone-based water-treatment system.

For the restless, Destination Fox Harb'r Too carries an assortment of toys including 19' Nautica tender, 2 x waverunners, snorkel gear, water ski's and towables, rowing machine / recumbent bicycle, and a deck Jacuzzi to relax in after play time!

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Trinity superyacht Destination Fox Harb'r Too now for sale at IYC

It's another central agency change here as Mark Elliott at International Yacht Collection takes over the listing for sale of the 49 metre motor yacht Destination Fox Harb’r Too .

Built by US superyacht yard Trinity Yachts to ABS class, Destination Fox Harb'r Too was delivered in 2008 as a tri-deck Trinity 161 model. Designed by Geoff Van Aller, her interior is by Patrick Knowles, and she can accommodate 12 guests in six staterooms. The master suite is full beam on the main deck with panoramic forward facing windows, a private office, two settees, a king size bed, and a full entertainment system with a 42 inch flat screen television. Below, three double staterooms have queen beds and 26 inch flat screen televisions while a twin cabin has a Pullman berth and a 26 inch flat screen television. All staterooms have full en suite bathroom facilities.

Destination Fox Harb'r Too is MCA compliant. She is equipped throughout with constant WiFi internet capability, iPod docking stations, a Crestron touchpad lighting and audiovisual system, and an integrated telephone system.

A range of 3,000 nautical miles at 12 knots and a maximum speed of 20 knots is provided by two 2,250hp Caterpillar diesel engines.

Lying in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Destination Fox Harb’r Too is asking $17.9 million.

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Charter Yacht 'DESTINATION FOX HARB’R TOO' in Toronto

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By Louise Marsh   15 August 2013

'DESTINATION FOX HARB'R TOO' will be relocating to Toronto this week and will be available for charter.

The 49.1 metre charter yacht ' Destination Fox Harb'r Too' was built in 2008 and is a Trinity Yachts charter yacht .

Featuring naval architecture by the shipyard and exterior styling by Geoff Van Aller , she is ABS classed and MCA compliant.

Her interior, desgined by Patrick Knowles , offers accommodation for up to 11 charter guests in five staterooms - a master suite, three double staterooms and one twin stateroom with a Pullman berth. Captain Bill Hawes heads her crew of 10 and will ensure you experience the very best luxury yacht charter vacation. 'Destination Fox Harb’r Too' features generous deck spaces, underwater lights, a gym, on-deck Jacuzzi, barbeque, swimming platform and a library and she carries a number of watertoys on board that include waverrunners, water skis, snorkelling equipment and a range of towable toys. As well as being available for family yacht charter vacations , she also offers corporate yacht charters as well as event yacht charters .

She is available to charter from $230,000 per week or $35,000 per day but is not available to US Resident while in US waters.

Get in touch with your preferred yacht charter broker for more information.

'Destination Fox Harb’r Too' features generous deck spaces, underwater lights, a gym, on-deck Jacuzzi, barbeque, swimming platform and a library...

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EXCITING ownership OPPORTUNITies at Fox harb’r

Imagine the tranquil setting and stunning ocean views. Nature walks along the Northumberland shore. Exhilarating golfing on immaculately trimmed courses. Dining to your heart’s content at award-winning restaurants. Enjoying exclusive luxury amenities. And spending quality time with new friends at your new home in a warm and welcoming world-class community like no other. That’s life at Fox Harb’r Resort.

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Harb’r stone village townhomes.

A collection of 18 spectacular townhomes coming to Harb’r Stone Village conceived by one of Canada’s most-acclaimed architects, Brian Mackay Lyons.

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Fractional ownership.

Make Fox Harb’r just one of your destination homes via our limited fractional ownership opportunities. With a limited quantity of Townhomes available through this program, you can secure your piece of this stunning location and experience all that Fox Harb’r has to offer.

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HARB’R STONE CUSTOM HOMES

Select the perfect site then design your ocean-view dream home from our plans or yours. Our custom homes feature welcoming New England-style architecture finished with exquisite designer materials.

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Fox harb’r resort lifestyle

Member for a day.

Picture yourself as a cherished member of our esteemed community. Delight in culinary excellence at our acclaimed restaurants, enjoy unparalleled amenities and forge lasting friendships with fellow residents in our vibrant and inclusive community!

OWNERSHIP HAS ITS BENEFITS

Joining the community at Fox Harb’r gives you access to unparalleled amenities that no other resort in Atlantic Canada can equal. Whether you arrive by car, yacht at the deep water marina or plan on the private jetway, you can be teeing off on the Graham Cooke designed Championship golf course within minutes. In addition to the Championship golf course, there are amenities to suite all tastes:

  • Sport Shooting, Archery & Axe Throwing
  • Spa & Fitness Centre featuring a 25 meter Junior Olympic Pool, Mineral Pool & Hot tub
  • Tennis & Pickleball Courts
  • Yacht & Pontoon Boat Tours
  • Mountain & E-Biking
  • Fine & Casual Dining
  • Private Golf Lessons & Club Fitting

elite alliance

Owning at Fox Harb’r is twofold. Fox Harb’r is your primary paradise but it is one of many options available to you and your family. Your home at Fox Harb’r allows you to discover other exotic and exciting locales around the globe through the the prestigious Elite Alliance exchange program. Ownership is your passport to vacations at more than 150 other amazing destinations worldwide. Elite Alliance’s exchange program allows owners at select family of prestigious residence clubs and luxurious, professionally managed vacation homes access to vacations around the world. The simple exchange process transforms your real estate ownership into a key that unlocks the door to seamless travel adventures – ski trips, golf getaways, beach escapes and much more – at a growing array of coveted destinations worldwide.

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A SPECTACULAR PLACE TO LIVE

Fox Harb’r is a seaside retreat nestled near the peaceful town of Wallace along Nova Scotia’s scenic Northumberland Coast – a haven of civility, character, cuisine, comfortable luxury, and East Coast charm.

HEAR WHAT FOX HARB’R HOMEOWNERS SAY

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reject null hypothesis definition

Statology

Statistics Made Easy

When Do You Reject the Null Hypothesis? (3 Examples)

A hypothesis test is a formal statistical test we use to reject or fail to reject a statistical hypothesis.

We always use the following steps to perform a hypothesis test:

Step 1: State the null and alternative hypotheses.

The null hypothesis , denoted as H 0 , is the hypothesis that the sample data occurs purely from chance.

The alternative hypothesis , denoted as H A , is the hypothesis that the sample data is influenced by some non-random cause.

2. Determine a significance level to use.

Decide on a significance level. Common choices are .01, .05, and .1. 

3. Calculate the test statistic and p-value.

Use the sample data to calculate a test statistic and a corresponding p-value .

4. Reject or fail to reject the null hypothesis.

If the p-value is less than the significance level, then you reject the null hypothesis.

If the p-value is not less than the significance level, then you fail to reject the null hypothesis.

You can use the following clever line to remember this rule:

“If the p is low, the null must go.”

In other words, if the p-value is low enough then we must reject the null hypothesis.

The following examples show when to reject (or fail to reject) the null hypothesis for the most common types of hypothesis tests.

Example 1: One Sample t-test

A  one sample t-test  is used to test whether or not the mean of a population is equal to some value.

For example, suppose we want to know whether or not the mean weight of a certain species of turtle is equal to 310 pounds.

We go out and collect a simple random sample of 40 turtles with the following information:

  • Sample size n = 40
  • Sample mean weight  x  = 300
  • Sample standard deviation s = 18.5

We can use the following steps to perform a one sample t-test:

Step 1: State the Null and Alternative Hypotheses

We will perform the one sample t-test with the following hypotheses:

  • H 0 :  μ = 310 (population mean is equal to 310 pounds)
  • H A :  μ ≠ 310 (population mean is not equal to 310 pounds)

We will choose to use a significance level of 0.05 .

We can plug in the numbers for the sample size, sample mean, and sample standard deviation into this One Sample t-test Calculator to calculate the test statistic and p-value:

  • t test statistic: -3.4187
  • two-tailed p-value: 0.0015

Since the p-value (0.0015) is less than the significance level (0.05) we reject the null hypothesis .

We conclude that there is sufficient evidence to say that the mean weight of turtles in this population is not equal to 310 pounds.

Example 2: Two Sample t-test

A  two sample t-test is used to test whether or not two population means are equal.

For example, suppose we want to know whether or not the mean weight between two different species of turtles is equal.

We go out and collect a simple random sample from each population with the following information:

  • Sample size n 1 = 40
  • Sample mean weight  x 1  = 300
  • Sample standard deviation s 1 = 18.5
  • Sample size n 2 = 38
  • Sample mean weight  x 2  = 305
  • Sample standard deviation s 2 = 16.7

We can use the following steps to perform a two sample t-test:

We will perform the two sample t-test with the following hypotheses:

  • H 0 :  μ 1  = μ 2 (the two population means are equal)
  • H 1 :  μ 1  ≠ μ 2 (the two population means are not equal)

We will choose to use a significance level of 0.10 .

We can plug in the numbers for the sample sizes, sample means, and sample standard deviations into this Two Sample t-test Calculator to calculate the test statistic and p-value:

  • t test statistic: -1.2508
  • two-tailed p-value: 0.2149

Since the p-value (0.2149) is not less than the significance level (0.10) we fail to reject the null hypothesis .

We do not have sufficient evidence to say that the mean weight of turtles between these two populations is different.

Example 3: Paired Samples t-test

A paired samples t-test is used to compare the means of two samples when each observation in one sample can be paired with an observation in the other sample.

For example, suppose we want to know whether or not a certain training program is able to increase the max vertical jump of college basketball players.

To test this, we may recruit a simple random sample of 20 college basketball players and measure each of their max vertical jumps. Then, we may have each player use the training program for one month and then measure their max vertical jump again at the end of the month:

Paired t-test example dataset

We can use the following steps to perform a paired samples t-test:

We will perform the paired samples t-test with the following hypotheses:

  • H 0 :  μ before = μ after (the two population means are equal)
  • H 1 :  μ before ≠ μ after (the two population means are not equal)

We will choose to use a significance level of 0.01 .

We can plug in the raw data for each sample into this Paired Samples t-test Calculator to calculate the test statistic and p-value:

  • t test statistic: -3.226
  • two-tailed p-value: 0.0045

Since the p-value (0.0045) is less than the significance level (0.01) we reject the null hypothesis .

We have sufficient evidence to say that the mean vertical jump before and after participating in the training program is not equal.

Bonus: Decision Rule Calculator 

You can use this decision rule calculator to automatically determine whether you should reject or fail to reject a null hypothesis for a hypothesis test based on the value of the test statistic.

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Hypothesis Testing (cont...)

Hypothesis testing, the null and alternative hypothesis.

In order to undertake hypothesis testing you need to express your research hypothesis as a null and alternative hypothesis. The null hypothesis and alternative hypothesis are statements regarding the differences or effects that occur in the population. You will use your sample to test which statement (i.e., the null hypothesis or alternative hypothesis) is most likely (although technically, you test the evidence against the null hypothesis). So, with respect to our teaching example, the null and alternative hypothesis will reflect statements about all statistics students on graduate management courses.

The null hypothesis is essentially the "devil's advocate" position. That is, it assumes that whatever you are trying to prove did not happen ( hint: it usually states that something equals zero). For example, the two different teaching methods did not result in different exam performances (i.e., zero difference). Another example might be that there is no relationship between anxiety and athletic performance (i.e., the slope is zero). The alternative hypothesis states the opposite and is usually the hypothesis you are trying to prove (e.g., the two different teaching methods did result in different exam performances). Initially, you can state these hypotheses in more general terms (e.g., using terms like "effect", "relationship", etc.), as shown below for the teaching methods example:

Depending on how you want to "summarize" the exam performances will determine how you might want to write a more specific null and alternative hypothesis. For example, you could compare the mean exam performance of each group (i.e., the "seminar" group and the "lectures-only" group). This is what we will demonstrate here, but other options include comparing the distributions , medians , amongst other things. As such, we can state:

Now that you have identified the null and alternative hypotheses, you need to find evidence and develop a strategy for declaring your "support" for either the null or alternative hypothesis. We can do this using some statistical theory and some arbitrary cut-off points. Both these issues are dealt with next.

Significance levels

The level of statistical significance is often expressed as the so-called p -value . Depending on the statistical test you have chosen, you will calculate a probability (i.e., the p -value) of observing your sample results (or more extreme) given that the null hypothesis is true . Another way of phrasing this is to consider the probability that a difference in a mean score (or other statistic) could have arisen based on the assumption that there really is no difference. Let us consider this statement with respect to our example where we are interested in the difference in mean exam performance between two different teaching methods. If there really is no difference between the two teaching methods in the population (i.e., given that the null hypothesis is true), how likely would it be to see a difference in the mean exam performance between the two teaching methods as large as (or larger than) that which has been observed in your sample?

So, you might get a p -value such as 0.03 (i.e., p = .03). This means that there is a 3% chance of finding a difference as large as (or larger than) the one in your study given that the null hypothesis is true. However, you want to know whether this is "statistically significant". Typically, if there was a 5% or less chance (5 times in 100 or less) that the difference in the mean exam performance between the two teaching methods (or whatever statistic you are using) is as different as observed given the null hypothesis is true, you would reject the null hypothesis and accept the alternative hypothesis. Alternately, if the chance was greater than 5% (5 times in 100 or more), you would fail to reject the null hypothesis and would not accept the alternative hypothesis. As such, in this example where p = .03, we would reject the null hypothesis and accept the alternative hypothesis. We reject it because at a significance level of 0.03 (i.e., less than a 5% chance), the result we obtained could happen too frequently for us to be confident that it was the two teaching methods that had an effect on exam performance.

Whilst there is relatively little justification why a significance level of 0.05 is used rather than 0.01 or 0.10, for example, it is widely used in academic research. However, if you want to be particularly confident in your results, you can set a more stringent level of 0.01 (a 1% chance or less; 1 in 100 chance or less).

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One- and two-tailed predictions

When considering whether we reject the null hypothesis and accept the alternative hypothesis, we need to consider the direction of the alternative hypothesis statement. For example, the alternative hypothesis that was stated earlier is:

The alternative hypothesis tells us two things. First, what predictions did we make about the effect of the independent variable(s) on the dependent variable(s)? Second, what was the predicted direction of this effect? Let's use our example to highlight these two points.

Sarah predicted that her teaching method (independent variable: teaching method), whereby she not only required her students to attend lectures, but also seminars, would have a positive effect (that is, increased) students' performance (dependent variable: exam marks). If an alternative hypothesis has a direction (and this is how you want to test it), the hypothesis is one-tailed. That is, it predicts direction of the effect. If the alternative hypothesis has stated that the effect was expected to be negative, this is also a one-tailed hypothesis.

Alternatively, a two-tailed prediction means that we do not make a choice over the direction that the effect of the experiment takes. Rather, it simply implies that the effect could be negative or positive. If Sarah had made a two-tailed prediction, the alternative hypothesis might have been:

In other words, we simply take out the word "positive", which implies the direction of our effect. In our example, making a two-tailed prediction may seem strange. After all, it would be logical to expect that "extra" tuition (going to seminar classes as well as lectures) would either have a positive effect on students' performance or no effect at all, but certainly not a negative effect. However, this is just our opinion (and hope) and certainly does not mean that we will get the effect we expect. Generally speaking, making a one-tail prediction (i.e., and testing for it this way) is frowned upon as it usually reflects the hope of a researcher rather than any certainty that it will happen. Notable exceptions to this rule are when there is only one possible way in which a change could occur. This can happen, for example, when biological activity/presence in measured. That is, a protein might be "dormant" and the stimulus you are using can only possibly "wake it up" (i.e., it cannot possibly reduce the activity of a "dormant" protein). In addition, for some statistical tests, one-tailed tests are not possible.

Rejecting or failing to reject the null hypothesis

Let's return finally to the question of whether we reject or fail to reject the null hypothesis.

If our statistical analysis shows that the significance level is below the cut-off value we have set (e.g., either 0.05 or 0.01), we reject the null hypothesis and accept the alternative hypothesis. Alternatively, if the significance level is above the cut-off value, we fail to reject the null hypothesis and cannot accept the alternative hypothesis. You should note that you cannot accept the null hypothesis, but only find evidence against it.

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Chapter 13: Inferential Statistics

Understanding Null Hypothesis Testing

Learning objectives.

  • Explain the purpose of null hypothesis testing, including the role of sampling error.
  • Describe the basic logic of null hypothesis testing.
  • Describe the role of relationship strength and sample size in determining statistical significance and make reasonable judgments about statistical significance based on these two factors.

The Purpose of Null Hypothesis Testing

As we have seen, psychological research typically involves measuring one or more variables for a sample and computing descriptive statistics for that sample. In general, however, the researcher’s goal is not to draw conclusions about that sample but to draw conclusions about the population that the sample was selected from. Thus researchers must use sample statistics to draw conclusions about the corresponding values in the population. These corresponding values in the population are called  parameters . Imagine, for example, that a researcher measures the number of depressive symptoms exhibited by each of 50 clinically depressed adults and computes the mean number of symptoms. The researcher probably wants to use this sample statistic (the mean number of symptoms for the sample) to draw conclusions about the corresponding population parameter (the mean number of symptoms for clinically depressed adults).

Unfortunately, sample statistics are not perfect estimates of their corresponding population parameters. This is because there is a certain amount of random variability in any statistic from sample to sample. The mean number of depressive symptoms might be 8.73 in one sample of clinically depressed adults, 6.45 in a second sample, and 9.44 in a third—even though these samples are selected randomly from the same population. Similarly, the correlation (Pearson’s  r ) between two variables might be +.24 in one sample, −.04 in a second sample, and +.15 in a third—again, even though these samples are selected randomly from the same population. This random variability in a statistic from sample to sample is called  sampling error . (Note that the term error  here refers to random variability and does not imply that anyone has made a mistake. No one “commits a sampling error.”)

One implication of this is that when there is a statistical relationship in a sample, it is not always clear that there is a statistical relationship in the population. A small difference between two group means in a sample might indicate that there is a small difference between the two group means in the population. But it could also be that there is no difference between the means in the population and that the difference in the sample is just a matter of sampling error. Similarly, a Pearson’s  r  value of −.29 in a sample might mean that there is a negative relationship in the population. But it could also be that there is no relationship in the population and that the relationship in the sample is just a matter of sampling error.

In fact, any statistical relationship in a sample can be interpreted in two ways:

  • There is a relationship in the population, and the relationship in the sample reflects this.
  • There is no relationship in the population, and the relationship in the sample reflects only sampling error.

The purpose of null hypothesis testing is simply to help researchers decide between these two interpretations.

The Logic of Null Hypothesis Testing

Null hypothesis testing  is a formal approach to deciding between two interpretations of a statistical relationship in a sample. One interpretation is called the   null hypothesis  (often symbolized  H 0  and read as “H-naught”). This is the idea that there is no relationship in the population and that the relationship in the sample reflects only sampling error. Informally, the null hypothesis is that the sample relationship “occurred by chance.” The other interpretation is called the  alternative hypothesis  (often symbolized as  H 1 ). This is the idea that there is a relationship in the population and that the relationship in the sample reflects this relationship in the population.

Again, every statistical relationship in a sample can be interpreted in either of these two ways: It might have occurred by chance, or it might reflect a relationship in the population. So researchers need a way to decide between them. Although there are many specific null hypothesis testing techniques, they are all based on the same general logic. The steps are as follows:

  • Assume for the moment that the null hypothesis is true. There is no relationship between the variables in the population.
  • Determine how likely the sample relationship would be if the null hypothesis were true.
  • If the sample relationship would be extremely unlikely, then reject the null hypothesis  in favour of the alternative hypothesis. If it would not be extremely unlikely, then  retain the null hypothesis .

Following this logic, we can begin to understand why Mehl and his colleagues concluded that there is no difference in talkativeness between women and men in the population. In essence, they asked the following question: “If there were no difference in the population, how likely is it that we would find a small difference of  d  = 0.06 in our sample?” Their answer to this question was that this sample relationship would be fairly likely if the null hypothesis were true. Therefore, they retained the null hypothesis—concluding that there is no evidence of a sex difference in the population. We can also see why Kanner and his colleagues concluded that there is a correlation between hassles and symptoms in the population. They asked, “If the null hypothesis were true, how likely is it that we would find a strong correlation of +.60 in our sample?” Their answer to this question was that this sample relationship would be fairly unlikely if the null hypothesis were true. Therefore, they rejected the null hypothesis in favour of the alternative hypothesis—concluding that there is a positive correlation between these variables in the population.

A crucial step in null hypothesis testing is finding the likelihood of the sample result if the null hypothesis were true. This probability is called the  p value . A low  p  value means that the sample result would be unlikely if the null hypothesis were true and leads to the rejection of the null hypothesis. A high  p  value means that the sample result would be likely if the null hypothesis were true and leads to the retention of the null hypothesis. But how low must the  p  value be before the sample result is considered unlikely enough to reject the null hypothesis? In null hypothesis testing, this criterion is called  α (alpha)  and is almost always set to .05. If there is less than a 5% chance of a result as extreme as the sample result if the null hypothesis were true, then the null hypothesis is rejected. When this happens, the result is said to be  statistically significant . If there is greater than a 5% chance of a result as extreme as the sample result when the null hypothesis is true, then the null hypothesis is retained. This does not necessarily mean that the researcher accepts the null hypothesis as true—only that there is not currently enough evidence to conclude that it is true. Researchers often use the expression “fail to reject the null hypothesis” rather than “retain the null hypothesis,” but they never use the expression “accept the null hypothesis.”

The Misunderstood  p  Value

The  p  value is one of the most misunderstood quantities in psychological research (Cohen, 1994) [1] . Even professional researchers misinterpret it, and it is not unusual for such misinterpretations to appear in statistics textbooks!

The most common misinterpretation is that the  p  value is the probability that the null hypothesis is true—that the sample result occurred by chance. For example, a misguided researcher might say that because the  p  value is .02, there is only a 2% chance that the result is due to chance and a 98% chance that it reflects a real relationship in the population. But this is incorrect . The  p  value is really the probability of a result at least as extreme as the sample result  if  the null hypothesis  were  true. So a  p  value of .02 means that if the null hypothesis were true, a sample result this extreme would occur only 2% of the time.

You can avoid this misunderstanding by remembering that the  p  value is not the probability that any particular  hypothesis  is true or false. Instead, it is the probability of obtaining the  sample result  if the null hypothesis were true.

Role of Sample Size and Relationship Strength

Recall that null hypothesis testing involves answering the question, “If the null hypothesis were true, what is the probability of a sample result as extreme as this one?” In other words, “What is the  p  value?” It can be helpful to see that the answer to this question depends on just two considerations: the strength of the relationship and the size of the sample. Specifically, the stronger the sample relationship and the larger the sample, the less likely the result would be if the null hypothesis were true. That is, the lower the  p  value. This should make sense. Imagine a study in which a sample of 500 women is compared with a sample of 500 men in terms of some psychological characteristic, and Cohen’s  d  is a strong 0.50. If there were really no sex difference in the population, then a result this strong based on such a large sample should seem highly unlikely. Now imagine a similar study in which a sample of three women is compared with a sample of three men, and Cohen’s  d  is a weak 0.10. If there were no sex difference in the population, then a relationship this weak based on such a small sample should seem likely. And this is precisely why the null hypothesis would be rejected in the first example and retained in the second.

Of course, sometimes the result can be weak and the sample large, or the result can be strong and the sample small. In these cases, the two considerations trade off against each other so that a weak result can be statistically significant if the sample is large enough and a strong relationship can be statistically significant even if the sample is small. Table 13.1 shows roughly how relationship strength and sample size combine to determine whether a sample result is statistically significant. The columns of the table represent the three levels of relationship strength: weak, medium, and strong. The rows represent four sample sizes that can be considered small, medium, large, and extra large in the context of psychological research. Thus each cell in the table represents a combination of relationship strength and sample size. If a cell contains the word  Yes , then this combination would be statistically significant for both Cohen’s  d  and Pearson’s  r . If it contains the word  No , then it would not be statistically significant for either. There is one cell where the decision for  d  and  r  would be different and another where it might be different depending on some additional considerations, which are discussed in Section 13.2 “Some Basic Null Hypothesis Tests”

Although Table 13.1 provides only a rough guideline, it shows very clearly that weak relationships based on medium or small samples are never statistically significant and that strong relationships based on medium or larger samples are always statistically significant. If you keep this lesson in mind, you will often know whether a result is statistically significant based on the descriptive statistics alone. It is extremely useful to be able to develop this kind of intuitive judgment. One reason is that it allows you to develop expectations about how your formal null hypothesis tests are going to come out, which in turn allows you to detect problems in your analyses. For example, if your sample relationship is strong and your sample is medium, then you would expect to reject the null hypothesis. If for some reason your formal null hypothesis test indicates otherwise, then you need to double-check your computations and interpretations. A second reason is that the ability to make this kind of intuitive judgment is an indication that you understand the basic logic of this approach in addition to being able to do the computations.

Statistical Significance Versus Practical Significance

Table 13.1 illustrates another extremely important point. A statistically significant result is not necessarily a strong one. Even a very weak result can be statistically significant if it is based on a large enough sample. This is closely related to Janet Shibley Hyde’s argument about sex differences (Hyde, 2007) [2] . The differences between women and men in mathematical problem solving and leadership ability are statistically significant. But the word  significant  can cause people to interpret these differences as strong and important—perhaps even important enough to influence the college courses they take or even who they vote for. As we have seen, however, these statistically significant differences are actually quite weak—perhaps even “trivial.”

This is why it is important to distinguish between the  statistical  significance of a result and the  practical  significance of that result.  Practical significance refers to the importance or usefulness of the result in some real-world context. Many sex differences are statistically significant—and may even be interesting for purely scientific reasons—but they are not practically significant. In clinical practice, this same concept is often referred to as “clinical significance.” For example, a study on a new treatment for social phobia might show that it produces a statistically significant positive effect. Yet this effect still might not be strong enough to justify the time, effort, and other costs of putting it into practice—especially if easier and cheaper treatments that work almost as well already exist. Although statistically significant, this result would be said to lack practical or clinical significance.

Key Takeaways

  • Null hypothesis testing is a formal approach to deciding whether a statistical relationship in a sample reflects a real relationship in the population or is just due to chance.
  • The logic of null hypothesis testing involves assuming that the null hypothesis is true, finding how likely the sample result would be if this assumption were correct, and then making a decision. If the sample result would be unlikely if the null hypothesis were true, then it is rejected in favour of the alternative hypothesis. If it would not be unlikely, then the null hypothesis is retained.
  • The probability of obtaining the sample result if the null hypothesis were true (the  p  value) is based on two considerations: relationship strength and sample size. Reasonable judgments about whether a sample relationship is statistically significant can often be made by quickly considering these two factors.
  • Statistical significance is not the same as relationship strength or importance. Even weak relationships can be statistically significant if the sample size is large enough. It is important to consider relationship strength and the practical significance of a result in addition to its statistical significance.
  • Discussion: Imagine a study showing that people who eat more broccoli tend to be happier. Explain for someone who knows nothing about statistics why the researchers would conduct a null hypothesis test.
  • The correlation between two variables is  r  = −.78 based on a sample size of 137.
  • The mean score on a psychological characteristic for women is 25 ( SD  = 5) and the mean score for men is 24 ( SD  = 5). There were 12 women and 10 men in this study.
  • In a memory experiment, the mean number of items recalled by the 40 participants in Condition A was 0.50 standard deviations greater than the mean number recalled by the 40 participants in Condition B.
  • In another memory experiment, the mean scores for participants in Condition A and Condition B came out exactly the same!
  • A student finds a correlation of  r  = .04 between the number of units the students in his research methods class are taking and the students’ level of stress.

Long Descriptions

“Null Hypothesis” long description: A comic depicting a man and a woman talking in the foreground. In the background is a child working at a desk. The man says to the woman, “I can’t believe schools are still teaching kids about the null hypothesis. I remember reading a big study that conclusively disproved it years ago.” [Return to “Null Hypothesis”]

“Conditional Risk” long description: A comic depicting two hikers beside a tree during a thunderstorm. A bolt of lightning goes “crack” in the dark sky as thunder booms. One of the hikers says, “Whoa! We should get inside!” The other hiker says, “It’s okay! Lightning only kills about 45 Americans a year, so the chances of dying are only one in 7,000,000. Let’s go on!” The comic’s caption says, “The annual death rate among people who know that statistic is one in six.” [Return to “Conditional Risk”]

Media Attributions

  • Null Hypothesis by XKCD  CC BY-NC (Attribution NonCommercial)
  • Conditional Risk by XKCD  CC BY-NC (Attribution NonCommercial)
  • Cohen, J. (1994). The world is round: p < .05. American Psychologist, 49 , 997–1003. ↵
  • Hyde, J. S. (2007). New directions in the study of gender similarities and differences. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 16 , 259–263. ↵

Values in a population that correspond to variables measured in a study.

The random variability in a statistic from sample to sample.

A formal approach to deciding between two interpretations of a statistical relationship in a sample.

The idea that there is no relationship in the population and that the relationship in the sample reflects only sampling error.

The idea that there is a relationship in the population and that the relationship in the sample reflects this relationship in the population.

When the relationship found in the sample would be extremely unlikely, the idea that the relationship occurred “by chance” is rejected.

When the relationship found in the sample is likely to have occurred by chance, the null hypothesis is not rejected.

The probability that, if the null hypothesis were true, the result found in the sample would occur.

How low the p value must be before the sample result is considered unlikely in null hypothesis testing.

When there is less than a 5% chance of a result as extreme as the sample result occurring and the null hypothesis is rejected.

Research Methods in Psychology - 2nd Canadian Edition Copyright © 2015 by Paul C. Price, Rajiv Jhangiani, & I-Chant A. Chiang is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License , except where otherwise noted.

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9.1: Introduction to Hypothesis Testing

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Basic Theory

Preliminaries.

As usual, our starting point is a random experiment with an underlying sample space and a probability measure \(\P\). In the basic statistical model, we have an observable random variable \(\bs{X}\) taking values in a set \(S\). In general, \(\bs{X}\) can have quite a complicated structure. For example, if the experiment is to sample \(n\) objects from a population and record various measurements of interest, then \[ \bs{X} = (X_1, X_2, \ldots, X_n) \] where \(X_i\) is the vector of measurements for the \(i\)th object. The most important special case occurs when \((X_1, X_2, \ldots, X_n)\) are independent and identically distributed. In this case, we have a random sample of size \(n\) from the common distribution.

The purpose of this section is to define and discuss the basic concepts of statistical hypothesis testing . Collectively, these concepts are sometimes referred to as the Neyman-Pearson framework, in honor of Jerzy Neyman and Egon Pearson, who first formalized them.

A statistical hypothesis is a statement about the distribution of \(\bs{X}\). Equivalently, a statistical hypothesis specifies a set of possible distributions of \(\bs{X}\): the set of distributions for which the statement is true. A hypothesis that specifies a single distribution for \(\bs{X}\) is called simple ; a hypothesis that specifies more than one distribution for \(\bs{X}\) is called composite .

In hypothesis testing , the goal is to see if there is sufficient statistical evidence to reject a presumed null hypothesis in favor of a conjectured alternative hypothesis . The null hypothesis is usually denoted \(H_0\) while the alternative hypothesis is usually denoted \(H_1\).

An hypothesis test is a statistical decision ; the conclusion will either be to reject the null hypothesis in favor of the alternative, or to fail to reject the null hypothesis. The decision that we make must, of course, be based on the observed value \(\bs{x}\) of the data vector \(\bs{X}\). Thus, we will find an appropriate subset \(R\) of the sample space \(S\) and reject \(H_0\) if and only if \(\bs{x} \in R\). The set \(R\) is known as the rejection region or the critical region . Note the asymmetry between the null and alternative hypotheses. This asymmetry is due to the fact that we assume the null hypothesis, in a sense, and then see if there is sufficient evidence in \(\bs{x}\) to overturn this assumption in favor of the alternative.

An hypothesis test is a statistical analogy to proof by contradiction, in a sense. Suppose for a moment that \(H_1\) is a statement in a mathematical theory and that \(H_0\) is its negation. One way that we can prove \(H_1\) is to assume \(H_0\) and work our way logically to a contradiction. In an hypothesis test, we don't prove anything of course, but there are similarities. We assume \(H_0\) and then see if the data \(\bs{x}\) are sufficiently at odds with that assumption that we feel justified in rejecting \(H_0\) in favor of \(H_1\).

Often, the critical region is defined in terms of a statistic \(w(\bs{X})\), known as a test statistic , where \(w\) is a function from \(S\) into another set \(T\). We find an appropriate rejection region \(R_T \subseteq T\) and reject \(H_0\) when the observed value \(w(\bs{x}) \in R_T\). Thus, the rejection region in \(S\) is then \(R = w^{-1}(R_T) = \left\{\bs{x} \in S: w(\bs{x}) \in R_T\right\}\). As usual, the use of a statistic often allows significant data reduction when the dimension of the test statistic is much smaller than the dimension of the data vector.

The ultimate decision may be correct or may be in error. There are two types of errors, depending on which of the hypotheses is actually true.

Types of errors:

  • A type 1 error is rejecting the null hypothesis \(H_0\) when \(H_0\) is true.
  • A type 2 error is failing to reject the null hypothesis \(H_0\) when the alternative hypothesis \(H_1\) is true.

Similarly, there are two ways to make a correct decision: we could reject \(H_0\) when \(H_1\) is true or we could fail to reject \(H_0\) when \(H_0\) is true. The possibilities are summarized in the following table:

Of course, when we observe \(\bs{X} = \bs{x}\) and make our decision, either we will have made the correct decision or we will have committed an error, and usually we will never know which of these events has occurred. Prior to gathering the data, however, we can consider the probabilities of the various errors.

If \(H_0\) is true (that is, the distribution of \(\bs{X}\) is specified by \(H_0\)), then \(\P(\bs{X} \in R)\) is the probability of a type 1 error for this distribution. If \(H_0\) is composite, then \(H_0\) specifies a variety of different distributions for \(\bs{X}\) and thus there is a set of type 1 error probabilities.

The maximum probability of a type 1 error, over the set of distributions specified by \( H_0 \), is the significance level of the test or the size of the critical region.

The significance level is often denoted by \(\alpha\). Usually, the rejection region is constructed so that the significance level is a prescribed, small value (typically 0.1, 0.05, 0.01).

If \(H_1\) is true (that is, the distribution of \(\bs{X}\) is specified by \(H_1\)), then \(\P(\bs{X} \notin R)\) is the probability of a type 2 error for this distribution. Again, if \(H_1\) is composite then \(H_1\) specifies a variety of different distributions for \(\bs{X}\), and thus there will be a set of type 2 error probabilities. Generally, there is a tradeoff between the type 1 and type 2 error probabilities. If we reduce the probability of a type 1 error, by making the rejection region \(R\) smaller, we necessarily increase the probability of a type 2 error because the complementary region \(S \setminus R\) is larger.

The extreme cases can give us some insight. First consider the decision rule in which we never reject \(H_0\), regardless of the evidence \(\bs{x}\). This corresponds to the rejection region \(R = \emptyset\). A type 1 error is impossible, so the significance level is 0. On the other hand, the probability of a type 2 error is 1 for any distribution defined by \(H_1\). At the other extreme, consider the decision rule in which we always rejects \(H_0\) regardless of the evidence \(\bs{x}\). This corresponds to the rejection region \(R = S\). A type 2 error is impossible, but now the probability of a type 1 error is 1 for any distribution defined by \(H_0\). In between these two worthless tests are meaningful tests that take the evidence \(\bs{x}\) into account.

If \(H_1\) is true, so that the distribution of \(\bs{X}\) is specified by \(H_1\), then \(\P(\bs{X} \in R)\), the probability of rejecting \(H_0\) is the power of the test for that distribution.

Thus the power of the test for a distribution specified by \( H_1 \) is the probability of making the correct decision.

Suppose that we have two tests, corresponding to rejection regions \(R_1\) and \(R_2\), respectively, each having significance level \(\alpha\). The test with region \(R_1\) is uniformly more powerful than the test with region \(R_2\) if \[ \P(\bs{X} \in R_1) \ge \P(\bs{X} \in R_2) \text{ for every distribution of } \bs{X} \text{ specified by } H_1 \]

Naturally, in this case, we would prefer the first test. Often, however, two tests will not be uniformly ordered; one test will be more powerful for some distributions specified by \(H_1\) while the other test will be more powerful for other distributions specified by \(H_1\).

If a test has significance level \(\alpha\) and is uniformly more powerful than any other test with significance level \(\alpha\), then the test is said to be a uniformly most powerful test at level \(\alpha\).

Clearly a uniformly most powerful test is the best we can do.

\(P\)-value

In most cases, we have a general procedure that allows us to construct a test (that is, a rejection region \(R_\alpha\)) for any given significance level \(\alpha \in (0, 1)\). Typically, \(R_\alpha\) decreases (in the subset sense) as \(\alpha\) decreases.

The \(P\)-value of the observed value \(\bs{x}\) of \(\bs{X}\), denoted \(P(\bs{x})\), is defined to be the smallest \(\alpha\) for which \(\bs{x} \in R_\alpha\); that is, the smallest significance level for which \(H_0\) is rejected, given \(\bs{X} = \bs{x}\).

Knowing \(P(\bs{x})\) allows us to test \(H_0\) at any significance level for the given data \(\bs{x}\): If \(P(\bs{x}) \le \alpha\) then we would reject \(H_0\) at significance level \(\alpha\); if \(P(\bs{x}) \gt \alpha\) then we fail to reject \(H_0\) at significance level \(\alpha\). Note that \(P(\bs{X})\) is a statistic . Informally, \(P(\bs{x})\) can often be thought of as the probability of an outcome as or more extreme than the observed value \(\bs{x}\), where extreme is interpreted relative to the null hypothesis \(H_0\).

Analogy with Justice Systems

There is a helpful analogy between statistical hypothesis testing and the criminal justice system in the US and various other countries. Consider a person charged with a crime. The presumed null hypothesis is that the person is innocent of the crime; the conjectured alternative hypothesis is that the person is guilty of the crime. The test of the hypotheses is a trial with evidence presented by both sides playing the role of the data. After considering the evidence, the jury delivers the decision as either not guilty or guilty . Note that innocent is not a possible verdict of the jury, because it is not the point of the trial to prove the person innocent. Rather, the point of the trial is to see whether there is sufficient evidence to overturn the null hypothesis that the person is innocent in favor of the alternative hypothesis of that the person is guilty. A type 1 error is convicting a person who is innocent; a type 2 error is acquitting a person who is guilty. Generally, a type 1 error is considered the more serious of the two possible errors, so in an attempt to hold the chance of a type 1 error to a very low level, the standard for conviction in serious criminal cases is beyond a reasonable doubt .

Tests of an Unknown Parameter

Hypothesis testing is a very general concept, but an important special class occurs when the distribution of the data variable \(\bs{X}\) depends on a parameter \(\theta\) taking values in a parameter space \(\Theta\). The parameter may be vector-valued, so that \(\bs{\theta} = (\theta_1, \theta_2, \ldots, \theta_n)\) and \(\Theta \subseteq \R^k\) for some \(k \in \N_+\). The hypotheses generally take the form \[ H_0: \theta \in \Theta_0 \text{ versus } H_1: \theta \notin \Theta_0 \] where \(\Theta_0\) is a prescribed subset of the parameter space \(\Theta\). In this setting, the probabilities of making an error or a correct decision depend on the true value of \(\theta\). If \(R\) is the rejection region, then the power function \( Q \) is given by \[ Q(\theta) = \P_\theta(\bs{X} \in R), \quad \theta \in \Theta \] The power function gives a lot of information about the test.

The power function satisfies the following properties:

  • \(Q(\theta)\) is the probability of a type 1 error when \(\theta \in \Theta_0\).
  • \(\max\left\{Q(\theta): \theta \in \Theta_0\right\}\) is the significance level of the test.
  • \(1 - Q(\theta)\) is the probability of a type 2 error when \(\theta \notin \Theta_0\).
  • \(Q(\theta)\) is the power of the test when \(\theta \notin \Theta_0\).

If we have two tests, we can compare them by means of their power functions.

Suppose that we have two tests, corresponding to rejection regions \(R_1\) and \(R_2\), respectively, each having significance level \(\alpha\). The test with rejection region \(R_1\) is uniformly more powerful than the test with rejection region \(R_2\) if \( Q_1(\theta) \ge Q_2(\theta)\) for all \( \theta \notin \Theta_0 \).

Most hypothesis tests of an unknown real parameter \(\theta\) fall into three special cases:

Suppose that \( \theta \) is a real parameter and \( \theta_0 \in \Theta \) a specified value. The tests below are respectively the two-sided test , the left-tailed test , and the right-tailed test .

  • \(H_0: \theta = \theta_0\) versus \(H_1: \theta \ne \theta_0\)
  • \(H_0: \theta \ge \theta_0\) versus \(H_1: \theta \lt \theta_0\)
  • \(H_0: \theta \le \theta_0\) versus \(H_1: \theta \gt \theta_0\)

Thus the tests are named after the conjectured alternative. Of course, there may be other unknown parameters besides \(\theta\) (known as nuisance parameters ).

Equivalence Between Hypothesis Test and Confidence Sets

There is an equivalence between hypothesis tests and confidence sets for a parameter \(\theta\).

Suppose that \(C(\bs{x})\) is a \(1 - \alpha\) level confidence set for \(\theta\). The following test has significance level \(\alpha\) for the hypothesis \( H_0: \theta = \theta_0 \) versus \( H_1: \theta \ne \theta_0 \): Reject \(H_0\) if and only if \(\theta_0 \notin C(\bs{x})\)

By definition, \(\P[\theta \in C(\bs{X})] = 1 - \alpha\). Hence if \(H_0\) is true so that \(\theta = \theta_0\), then the probability of a type 1 error is \(P[\theta \notin C(\bs{X})] = \alpha\).

Equivalently, we fail to reject \(H_0\) at significance level \(\alpha\) if and only if \(\theta_0\) is in the corresponding \(1 - \alpha\) level confidence set. In particular, this equivalence applies to interval estimates of a real parameter \(\theta\) and the common tests for \(\theta\) given above .

In each case below, the confidence interval has confidence level \(1 - \alpha\) and the test has significance level \(\alpha\).

  • Suppose that \(\left[L(\bs{X}, U(\bs{X})\right]\) is a two-sided confidence interval for \(\theta\). Reject \(H_0: \theta = \theta_0\) versus \(H_1: \theta \ne \theta_0\) if and only if \(\theta_0 \lt L(\bs{X})\) or \(\theta_0 \gt U(\bs{X})\).
  • Suppose that \(L(\bs{X})\) is a confidence lower bound for \(\theta\). Reject \(H_0: \theta \le \theta_0\) versus \(H_1: \theta \gt \theta_0\) if and only if \(\theta_0 \lt L(\bs{X})\).
  • Suppose that \(U(\bs{X})\) is a confidence upper bound for \(\theta\). Reject \(H_0: \theta \ge \theta_0\) versus \(H_1: \theta \lt \theta_0\) if and only if \(\theta_0 \gt U(\bs{X})\).

Pivot Variables and Test Statistics

Recall that confidence sets of an unknown parameter \(\theta\) are often constructed through a pivot variable , that is, a random variable \(W(\bs{X}, \theta)\) that depends on the data vector \(\bs{X}\) and the parameter \(\theta\), but whose distribution does not depend on \(\theta\) and is known. In this case, a natural test statistic for the basic tests given above is \(W(\bs{X}, \theta_0)\).

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  • Inferential Statistics

 The Purpose of Null Hypothesis Testing

As we have seen, psychological research typically involves measuring one or more variables in a sample and computing descriptive summary data (e.g., means, correlation coefficients) for those variables. These descriptive data for the sample are called statistics .  In general, however, the researcher’s goal is not to draw conclusions about that sample but to draw conclusions about the population that the sample was selected from. Thus researchers must use sample statistics to draw conclusions about the corresponding values in the population. These corresponding values in the population are called parameters . Imagine, for example, that a researcher measures the number of depressive symptoms exhibited by each of 50 adults with clinical depression and computes the mean number of symptoms. The researcher probably wants to use this sample statistic (the mean number of symptoms for the sample) to draw conclusions about the corresponding population parameter (the mean number of symptoms for adults with clinical depression).

Unfortunately, sample statistics are not perfect estimates of their corresponding population parameters. This is because there is a certain amount of random variability in any statistic from sample to sample. The mean number of depressive symptoms might be 8.73 in one sample of adults with clinical depression, 6.45 in a second sample, and 9.44 in a third—even though these samples are selected randomly from the same population. Similarly, the correlation (Pearson’s  r ) between two variables might be +.24 in one sample, −.04 in a second sample, and +.15 in a third—again, even though these samples are selected randomly from the same population. This random variability in a statistic from sample to sample is called  sampling error . (Note that the term error  here refers to random variability and does not imply that anyone has made a mistake. No one “commits a sampling error.”)

Null hypothesis testing (often called null hypothesis significance testing or NHST) is a formal approach to deciding between two interpretations of a statistical relationship in a sample. One interpretation is called the   null hypothesis  (often symbolized  H 0 and read as “H-zero”). This is the idea that there is no relationship in the population and that the relationship in the sample reflects only sampling error. Informally, the null hypothesis is that the sample relationship “occurred by chance.” The other interpretation is called the alternative hypothesis  (often symbolized as  H 1 ). This is the idea that there is a relationship in the population and that the relationship in the sample reflects this relationship in the population.

  • If the sample relationship would be extremely unlikely, then reject the null hypothesis  in favor of the alternative hypothesis. If it would not be extremely unlikely, then  retain the null hypothesis .

Following this logic, we can begin to understand why Mehl and his colleagues concluded that there is no difference in talkativeness between women and men in the population. In essence, they asked the following question: “If there were no difference in the population, how likely is it that we would find a small difference of  d  = 0.06 in our sample?” Their answer to this question was that this sample relationship would be fairly likely if the null hypothesis were true. Therefore, they retained the null hypothesis—concluding that there is no evidence of a sex difference in the population. We can also see why Kanner and his colleagues concluded that there is a correlation between hassles and symptoms in the population. They asked, “If the null hypothesis were true, how likely is it that we would find a strong correlation of +.60 in our sample?” Their answer to this question was that this sample relationship would be fairly unlikely if the null hypothesis were true. Therefore, they rejected the null hypothesis in favor of the alternative hypothesis—concluding that there is a positive correlation between these variables in the population.

A crucial step in null hypothesis testing is finding the probability of the sample result or a more extreme result if the null hypothesis were true (Lakens, 2017). [1] This probability is called the p value . A low  p value means that the sample or more extreme result would be unlikely if the null hypothesis were true and leads to the rejection of the null hypothesis. A p value that is not low means that the sample or more extreme result would be likely if the null hypothesis were true and leads to the retention of the null hypothesis. But how low must the p value criterion be before the sample result is considered unlikely enough to reject the null hypothesis? In null hypothesis testing, this criterion is called α (alpha) and is almost always set to .05. If there is a 5% chance or less of a result at least as extreme as the sample result if the null hypothesis were true, then the null hypothesis is rejected. When this happens, the result is said to be statistically significant . If there is greater than a 5% chance of a result as extreme as the sample result when the null hypothesis is true, then the null hypothesis is retained. This does not necessarily mean that the researcher accepts the null hypothesis as true—only that there is not currently enough evidence to reject it. Researchers often use the expression “fail to reject the null hypothesis” rather than “retain the null hypothesis,” but they never use the expression “accept the null hypothesis.”

The  p  value is one of the most misunderstood quantities in psychological research (Cohen, 1994) [2] . Even professional researchers misinterpret it, and it is not unusual for such misinterpretations to appear in statistics textbooks!

Null Hypothesis. Image description available.

Table 13.1 illustrates another extremely important point. A statistically significant result is not necessarily a strong one. Even a very weak result can be statistically significant if it is based on a large enough sample. This is closely related to Janet Shibley Hyde’s argument about sex differences (Hyde, 2007) [3] . The differences between women and men in mathematical problem solving and leadership ability are statistically significant. But the word  significant  can cause people to interpret these differences as strong and important—perhaps even important enough to influence the college courses they take or even who they vote for. As we have seen, however, these statistically significant differences are actually quite weak—perhaps even “trivial.”

Conditional Risk. Image description available.

Image Description

“Null Hypothesis” long description:  A comic depicting a man and a woman talking in the foreground. In the background is a child working at a desk. The man says to the woman, “I can’t believe schools are still teaching kids about the null hypothesis. I remember reading a big study that conclusively disproved it  years  ago.”  [Return to “Null Hypothesis”]

“Conditional Risk” long description:  A comic depicting two hikers beside a tree during a thunderstorm. A bolt of lightning goes “crack” in the dark sky as thunder booms. One of the hikers says, “Whoa! We should get inside!” The other hiker says, “It’s okay! Lightning only kills about 45 Americans a year, so the chances of dying are only one in 7,000,000. Let’s go on!” The comic’s caption says, “The annual death rate among people who know that statistic is one in six.”  [Return to “Conditional Risk”]

  • Null Hypothesis  by XKCD  CC BY-NC (Attribution NonCommercial)
  • Conditional Risk  by XKCD  CC BY-NC (Attribution NonCommercial)
  • Lakens, D. (2017, December 25). About p -values: Understanding common misconceptions. [Blog post] Retrieved from https://correlaid.org/en/blog/understand-p-values/ ↵

Descriptive data that involves measuring one or more variables in a sample and computing descriptive summary data (e.g., means, correlation coefficients) for those variables.

Corresponding values in the population.

The idea that there is no relationship in the population and that the relationship in the sample reflects only sampling error (often symbolized H0 and read as “H-zero”).

An alternative to the null hypothesis (often symbolized as H1), this hypothesis proposes that there is a relationship in the population and that the relationship in the sample reflects this relationship in the population.

A decision made by researchers using null hypothesis testing which occurs when the sample relationship would be extremely unlikely.

A decision made by researchers in null hypothesis testing which occurs when the sample relationship would not be extremely unlikely.

The probability of obtaining the sample result or a more extreme result if the null hypothesis were true.

The criterion that shows how low a p-value should be before the sample result is considered unlikely enough to reject the null hypothesis (Usually set to .05).

An effect that is unlikely due to random chance and therefore likely represents a real effect in the population.

Refers to the importance or usefulness of the result in some real-world context.

Research Methods in Psychology Copyright © 2019 by Rajiv S. Jhangiani, I-Chant A. Chiang, Carrie Cuttler, & Dana C. Leighton is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License , except where otherwise noted.

P-Value And Statistical Significance: What It Is & Why It Matters

Saul Mcleod, PhD

Editor-in-Chief for Simply Psychology

BSc (Hons) Psychology, MRes, PhD, University of Manchester

Saul Mcleod, PhD., is a qualified psychology teacher with over 18 years of experience in further and higher education. He has been published in peer-reviewed journals, including the Journal of Clinical Psychology.

Learn about our Editorial Process

Olivia Guy-Evans, MSc

Associate Editor for Simply Psychology

BSc (Hons) Psychology, MSc Psychology of Education

Olivia Guy-Evans is a writer and associate editor for Simply Psychology. She has previously worked in healthcare and educational sectors.

On This Page:

The p-value in statistics quantifies the evidence against a null hypothesis. A low p-value suggests data is inconsistent with the null, potentially favoring an alternative hypothesis. Common significance thresholds are 0.05 or 0.01.

P-Value Explained in Normal Distribution

Hypothesis testing

When you perform a statistical test, a p-value helps you determine the significance of your results in relation to the null hypothesis.

The null hypothesis (H0) states no relationship exists between the two variables being studied (one variable does not affect the other). It states the results are due to chance and are not significant in supporting the idea being investigated. Thus, the null hypothesis assumes that whatever you try to prove did not happen.

The alternative hypothesis (Ha or H1) is the one you would believe if the null hypothesis is concluded to be untrue.

The alternative hypothesis states that the independent variable affected the dependent variable, and the results are significant in supporting the theory being investigated (i.e., the results are not due to random chance).

What a p-value tells you

A p-value, or probability value, is a number describing how likely it is that your data would have occurred by random chance (i.e., that the null hypothesis is true).

The level of statistical significance is often expressed as a p-value between 0 and 1.

The smaller the p -value, the less likely the results occurred by random chance, and the stronger the evidence that you should reject the null hypothesis.

Remember, a p-value doesn’t tell you if the null hypothesis is true or false. It just tells you how likely you’d see the data you observed (or more extreme data) if the null hypothesis was true. It’s a piece of evidence, not a definitive proof.

Example: Test Statistic and p-Value

Suppose you’re conducting a study to determine whether a new drug has an effect on pain relief compared to a placebo. If the new drug has no impact, your test statistic will be close to the one predicted by the null hypothesis (no difference between the drug and placebo groups), and the resulting p-value will be close to 1. It may not be precisely 1 because real-world variations may exist. Conversely, if the new drug indeed reduces pain significantly, your test statistic will diverge further from what’s expected under the null hypothesis, and the p-value will decrease. The p-value will never reach zero because there’s always a slim possibility, though highly improbable, that the observed results occurred by random chance.

P-value interpretation

The significance level (alpha) is a set probability threshold (often 0.05), while the p-value is the probability you calculate based on your study or analysis.

A p-value less than or equal to your significance level (typically ≤ 0.05) is statistically significant.

A p-value less than or equal to a predetermined significance level (often 0.05 or 0.01) indicates a statistically significant result, meaning the observed data provide strong evidence against the null hypothesis.

This suggests the effect under study likely represents a real relationship rather than just random chance.

For instance, if you set α = 0.05, you would reject the null hypothesis if your p -value ≤ 0.05. 

It indicates strong evidence against the null hypothesis, as there is less than a 5% probability the null is correct (and the results are random).

Therefore, we reject the null hypothesis and accept the alternative hypothesis.

Example: Statistical Significance

Upon analyzing the pain relief effects of the new drug compared to the placebo, the computed p-value is less than 0.01, which falls well below the predetermined alpha value of 0.05. Consequently, you conclude that there is a statistically significant difference in pain relief between the new drug and the placebo.

What does a p-value of 0.001 mean?

A p-value of 0.001 is highly statistically significant beyond the commonly used 0.05 threshold. It indicates strong evidence of a real effect or difference, rather than just random variation.

Specifically, a p-value of 0.001 means there is only a 0.1% chance of obtaining a result at least as extreme as the one observed, assuming the null hypothesis is correct.

Such a small p-value provides strong evidence against the null hypothesis, leading to rejecting the null in favor of the alternative hypothesis.

A p-value more than the significance level (typically p > 0.05) is not statistically significant and indicates strong evidence for the null hypothesis.

This means we retain the null hypothesis and reject the alternative hypothesis. You should note that you cannot accept the null hypothesis; we can only reject it or fail to reject it.

Note : when the p-value is above your threshold of significance,  it does not mean that there is a 95% probability that the alternative hypothesis is true.

One-Tailed Test

Probability and statistical significance in ab testing. Statistical significance in a b experiments

Two-Tailed Test

statistical significance two tailed

How do you calculate the p-value ?

Most statistical software packages like R, SPSS, and others automatically calculate your p-value. This is the easiest and most common way.

Online resources and tables are available to estimate the p-value based on your test statistic and degrees of freedom.

These tables help you understand how often you would expect to see your test statistic under the null hypothesis.

Understanding the Statistical Test:

Different statistical tests are designed to answer specific research questions or hypotheses. Each test has its own underlying assumptions and characteristics.

For example, you might use a t-test to compare means, a chi-squared test for categorical data, or a correlation test to measure the strength of a relationship between variables.

Be aware that the number of independent variables you include in your analysis can influence the magnitude of the test statistic needed to produce the same p-value.

This factor is particularly important to consider when comparing results across different analyses.

Example: Choosing a Statistical Test

If you’re comparing the effectiveness of just two different drugs in pain relief, a two-sample t-test is a suitable choice for comparing these two groups. However, when you’re examining the impact of three or more drugs, it’s more appropriate to employ an Analysis of Variance ( ANOVA) . Utilizing multiple pairwise comparisons in such cases can lead to artificially low p-values and an overestimation of the significance of differences between the drug groups.

How to report

A statistically significant result cannot prove that a research hypothesis is correct (which implies 100% certainty).

Instead, we may state our results “provide support for” or “give evidence for” our research hypothesis (as there is still a slight probability that the results occurred by chance and the null hypothesis was correct – e.g., less than 5%).

Example: Reporting the results

In our comparison of the pain relief effects of the new drug and the placebo, we observed that participants in the drug group experienced a significant reduction in pain ( M = 3.5; SD = 0.8) compared to those in the placebo group ( M = 5.2; SD  = 0.7), resulting in an average difference of 1.7 points on the pain scale (t(98) = -9.36; p < 0.001).

The 6th edition of the APA style manual (American Psychological Association, 2010) states the following on the topic of reporting p-values:

“When reporting p values, report exact p values (e.g., p = .031) to two or three decimal places. However, report p values less than .001 as p < .001.

The tradition of reporting p values in the form p < .10, p < .05, p < .01, and so forth, was appropriate in a time when only limited tables of critical values were available.” (p. 114)

  • Do not use 0 before the decimal point for the statistical value p as it cannot equal 1. In other words, write p = .001 instead of p = 0.001.
  • Please pay attention to issues of italics ( p is always italicized) and spacing (either side of the = sign).
  • p = .000 (as outputted by some statistical packages such as SPSS) is impossible and should be written as p < .001.
  • The opposite of significant is “nonsignificant,” not “insignificant.”

Why is the p -value not enough?

A lower p-value  is sometimes interpreted as meaning there is a stronger relationship between two variables.

However, statistical significance means that it is unlikely that the null hypothesis is true (less than 5%).

To understand the strength of the difference between the two groups (control vs. experimental) a researcher needs to calculate the effect size .

When do you reject the null hypothesis?

In statistical hypothesis testing, you reject the null hypothesis when the p-value is less than or equal to the significance level (α) you set before conducting your test. The significance level is the probability of rejecting the null hypothesis when it is true. Commonly used significance levels are 0.01, 0.05, and 0.10.

Remember, rejecting the null hypothesis doesn’t prove the alternative hypothesis; it just suggests that the alternative hypothesis may be plausible given the observed data.

The p -value is conditional upon the null hypothesis being true but is unrelated to the truth or falsity of the alternative hypothesis.

What does p-value of 0.05 mean?

If your p-value is less than or equal to 0.05 (the significance level), you would conclude that your result is statistically significant. This means the evidence is strong enough to reject the null hypothesis in favor of the alternative hypothesis.

Are all p-values below 0.05 considered statistically significant?

No, not all p-values below 0.05 are considered statistically significant. The threshold of 0.05 is commonly used, but it’s just a convention. Statistical significance depends on factors like the study design, sample size, and the magnitude of the observed effect.

A p-value below 0.05 means there is evidence against the null hypothesis, suggesting a real effect. However, it’s essential to consider the context and other factors when interpreting results.

Researchers also look at effect size and confidence intervals to determine the practical significance and reliability of findings.

How does sample size affect the interpretation of p-values?

Sample size can impact the interpretation of p-values. A larger sample size provides more reliable and precise estimates of the population, leading to narrower confidence intervals.

With a larger sample, even small differences between groups or effects can become statistically significant, yielding lower p-values. In contrast, smaller sample sizes may not have enough statistical power to detect smaller effects, resulting in higher p-values.

Therefore, a larger sample size increases the chances of finding statistically significant results when there is a genuine effect, making the findings more trustworthy and robust.

Can a non-significant p-value indicate that there is no effect or difference in the data?

No, a non-significant p-value does not necessarily indicate that there is no effect or difference in the data. It means that the observed data do not provide strong enough evidence to reject the null hypothesis.

There could still be a real effect or difference, but it might be smaller or more variable than the study was able to detect.

Other factors like sample size, study design, and measurement precision can influence the p-value. It’s important to consider the entire body of evidence and not rely solely on p-values when interpreting research findings.

Can P values be exactly zero?

While a p-value can be extremely small, it cannot technically be absolute zero. When a p-value is reported as p = 0.000, the actual p-value is too small for the software to display. This is often interpreted as strong evidence against the null hypothesis. For p values less than 0.001, report as p < .001

Further Information

  • P-values and significance tests (Kahn Academy)
  • Hypothesis testing and p-values (Kahn Academy)
  • Wasserstein, R. L., Schirm, A. L., & Lazar, N. A. (2019). Moving to a world beyond “ p “< 0.05”.
  • Criticism of using the “ p “< 0.05”.
  • Publication manual of the American Psychological Association
  • Statistics for Psychology Book Download

Bland, J. M., & Altman, D. G. (1994). One and two sided tests of significance: Authors’ reply.  BMJ: British Medical Journal ,  309 (6958), 874.

Goodman, S. N., & Royall, R. (1988). Evidence and scientific research.  American Journal of Public Health ,  78 (12), 1568-1574.

Goodman, S. (2008, July). A dirty dozen: twelve p-value misconceptions . In  Seminars in hematology  (Vol. 45, No. 3, pp. 135-140). WB Saunders.

Lang, J. M., Rothman, K. J., & Cann, C. I. (1998). That confounded P-value.  Epidemiology (Cambridge, Mass.) ,  9 (1), 7-8.

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Null hypothesis significance testing: a short tutorial

Cyril pernet.

1 Centre for Clinical Brain Sciences (CCBS), Neuroimaging Sciences, The University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK

Version Changes

Revised. amendments from version 2.

This v3 includes minor changes that reflect the 3rd reviewers' comments - in particular the theoretical vs. practical difference between Fisher and Neyman-Pearson. Additional information and reference is also included regarding the interpretation of p-value for low powered studies.

Peer Review Summary

Although thoroughly criticized, null hypothesis significance testing (NHST) remains the statistical method of choice used to provide evidence for an effect, in biological, biomedical and social sciences. In this short tutorial, I first summarize the concepts behind the method, distinguishing test of significance (Fisher) and test of acceptance (Newman-Pearson) and point to common interpretation errors regarding the p-value. I then present the related concepts of confidence intervals and again point to common interpretation errors. Finally, I discuss what should be reported in which context. The goal is to clarify concepts to avoid interpretation errors and propose reporting practices.

The Null Hypothesis Significance Testing framework

NHST is a method of statistical inference by which an experimental factor is tested against a hypothesis of no effect or no relationship based on a given observation. The method is a combination of the concepts of significance testing developed by Fisher in 1925 and of acceptance based on critical rejection regions developed by Neyman & Pearson in 1928 . In the following I am first presenting each approach, highlighting the key differences and common misconceptions that result from their combination into the NHST framework (for a more mathematical comparison, along with the Bayesian method, see Christensen, 2005 ). I next present the related concept of confidence intervals. I finish by discussing practical aspects in using NHST and reporting practice.

Fisher, significance testing, and the p-value

The method developed by ( Fisher, 1934 ; Fisher, 1955 ; Fisher, 1959 ) allows to compute the probability of observing a result at least as extreme as a test statistic (e.g. t value), assuming the null hypothesis of no effect is true. This probability or p-value reflects (1) the conditional probability of achieving the observed outcome or larger: p(Obs≥t|H0), and (2) is therefore a cumulative probability rather than a point estimate. It is equal to the area under the null probability distribution curve from the observed test statistic to the tail of the null distribution ( Turkheimer et al. , 2004 ). The approach proposed is of ‘proof by contradiction’ ( Christensen, 2005 ), we pose the null model and test if data conform to it.

In practice, it is recommended to set a level of significance (a theoretical p-value) that acts as a reference point to identify significant results, that is to identify results that differ from the null-hypothesis of no effect. Fisher recommended using p=0.05 to judge whether an effect is significant or not as it is roughly two standard deviations away from the mean for the normal distribution ( Fisher, 1934 page 45: ‘The value for which p=.05, or 1 in 20, is 1.96 or nearly 2; it is convenient to take this point as a limit in judging whether a deviation is to be considered significant or not’). A key aspect of Fishers’ theory is that only the null-hypothesis is tested, and therefore p-values are meant to be used in a graded manner to decide whether the evidence is worth additional investigation and/or replication ( Fisher, 1971 page 13: ‘it is open to the experimenter to be more or less exacting in respect of the smallness of the probability he would require […]’ and ‘no isolated experiment, however significant in itself, can suffice for the experimental demonstration of any natural phenomenon’). How small the level of significance is, is thus left to researchers.

What is not a p-value? Common mistakes

The p-value is not an indication of the strength or magnitude of an effect . Any interpretation of the p-value in relation to the effect under study (strength, reliability, probability) is wrong, since p-values are conditioned on H0. In addition, while p-values are randomly distributed (if all the assumptions of the test are met) when there is no effect, their distribution depends of both the population effect size and the number of participants, making impossible to infer strength of effect from them.

Similarly, 1-p is not the probability to replicate an effect . Often, a small value of p is considered to mean a strong likelihood of getting the same results on another try, but again this cannot be obtained because the p-value is not informative on the effect itself ( Miller, 2009 ). Because the p-value depends on the number of subjects, it can only be used in high powered studies to interpret results. In low powered studies (typically small number of subjects), the p-value has a large variance across repeated samples, making it unreliable to estimate replication ( Halsey et al. , 2015 ).

A (small) p-value is not an indication favouring a given hypothesis . Because a low p-value only indicates a misfit of the null hypothesis to the data, it cannot be taken as evidence in favour of a specific alternative hypothesis more than any other possible alternatives such as measurement error and selection bias ( Gelman, 2013 ). Some authors have even argued that the more (a priori) implausible the alternative hypothesis, the greater the chance that a finding is a false alarm ( Krzywinski & Altman, 2013 ; Nuzzo, 2014 ).

The p-value is not the probability of the null hypothesis p(H0), of being true, ( Krzywinski & Altman, 2013 ). This common misconception arises from a confusion between the probability of an observation given the null p(Obs≥t|H0) and the probability of the null given an observation p(H0|Obs≥t) that is then taken as an indication for p(H0) (see Nickerson, 2000 ).

Neyman-Pearson, hypothesis testing, and the α-value

Neyman & Pearson (1933) proposed a framework of statistical inference for applied decision making and quality control. In such framework, two hypotheses are proposed: the null hypothesis of no effect and the alternative hypothesis of an effect, along with a control of the long run probabilities of making errors. The first key concept in this approach, is the establishment of an alternative hypothesis along with an a priori effect size. This differs markedly from Fisher who proposed a general approach for scientific inference conditioned on the null hypothesis only. The second key concept is the control of error rates . Neyman & Pearson (1928) introduced the notion of critical intervals, therefore dichotomizing the space of possible observations into correct vs. incorrect zones. This dichotomization allows distinguishing correct results (rejecting H0 when there is an effect and not rejecting H0 when there is no effect) from errors (rejecting H0 when there is no effect, the type I error, and not rejecting H0 when there is an effect, the type II error). In this context, alpha is the probability of committing a Type I error in the long run. Alternatively, Beta is the probability of committing a Type II error in the long run.

The (theoretical) difference in terms of hypothesis testing between Fisher and Neyman-Pearson is illustrated on Figure 1 . In the 1 st case, we choose a level of significance for observed data of 5%, and compute the p-value. If the p-value is below the level of significance, it is used to reject H0. In the 2 nd case, we set a critical interval based on the a priori effect size and error rates. If an observed statistic value is below and above the critical values (the bounds of the confidence region), it is deemed significantly different from H0. In the NHST framework, the level of significance is (in practice) assimilated to the alpha level, which appears as a simple decision rule: if the p-value is less or equal to alpha, the null is rejected. It is however a common mistake to assimilate these two concepts. The level of significance set for a given sample is not the same as the frequency of acceptance alpha found on repeated sampling because alpha (a point estimate) is meant to reflect the long run probability whilst the p-value (a cumulative estimate) reflects the current probability ( Fisher, 1955 ; Hubbard & Bayarri, 2003 ).

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The figure was prepared with G-power for a one-sided one-sample t-test, with a sample size of 32 subjects, an effect size of 0.45, and error rates alpha=0.049 and beta=0.80. In Fisher’s procedure, only the nil-hypothesis is posed, and the observed p-value is compared to an a priori level of significance. If the observed p-value is below this level (here p=0.05), one rejects H0. In Neyman-Pearson’s procedure, the null and alternative hypotheses are specified along with an a priori level of acceptance. If the observed statistical value is outside the critical region (here [-∞ +1.69]), one rejects H0.

Acceptance or rejection of H0?

The acceptance level α can also be viewed as the maximum probability that a test statistic falls into the rejection region when the null hypothesis is true ( Johnson, 2013 ). Therefore, one can only reject the null hypothesis if the test statistics falls into the critical region(s), or fail to reject this hypothesis. In the latter case, all we can say is that no significant effect was observed, but one cannot conclude that the null hypothesis is true. This is another common mistake in using NHST: there is a profound difference between accepting the null hypothesis and simply failing to reject it ( Killeen, 2005 ). By failing to reject, we simply continue to assume that H0 is true, which implies that one cannot argue against a theory from a non-significant result (absence of evidence is not evidence of absence). To accept the null hypothesis, tests of equivalence ( Walker & Nowacki, 2011 ) or Bayesian approaches ( Dienes, 2014 ; Kruschke, 2011 ) must be used.

Confidence intervals

Confidence intervals (CI) are builds that fail to cover the true value at a rate of alpha, the Type I error rate ( Morey & Rouder, 2011 ) and therefore indicate if observed values can be rejected by a (two tailed) test with a given alpha. CI have been advocated as alternatives to p-values because (i) they allow judging the statistical significance and (ii) provide estimates of effect size. Assuming the CI (a)symmetry and width are correct (but see Wilcox, 2012 ), they also give some indication about the likelihood that a similar value can be observed in future studies. For future studies of the same sample size, 95% CI give about 83% chance of replication success ( Cumming & Maillardet, 2006 ). If sample sizes however differ between studies, CI do not however warranty any a priori coverage.

Although CI provide more information, they are not less subject to interpretation errors (see Savalei & Dunn, 2015 for a review). The most common mistake is to interpret CI as the probability that a parameter (e.g. the population mean) will fall in that interval X% of the time. The correct interpretation is that, for repeated measurements with the same sample sizes, taken from the same population, X% of times the CI obtained will contain the true parameter value ( Tan & Tan, 2010 ). The alpha value has the same interpretation as testing against H0, i.e. we accept that 1-alpha CI are wrong in alpha percent of the times in the long run. This implies that CI do not allow to make strong statements about the parameter of interest (e.g. the mean difference) or about H1 ( Hoekstra et al. , 2014 ). To make a statement about the probability of a parameter of interest (e.g. the probability of the mean), Bayesian intervals must be used.

The (correct) use of NHST

NHST has always been criticized, and yet is still used every day in scientific reports ( Nickerson, 2000 ). One question to ask oneself is what is the goal of a scientific experiment at hand? If the goal is to establish a discrepancy with the null hypothesis and/or establish a pattern of order, because both requires ruling out equivalence, then NHST is a good tool ( Frick, 1996 ; Walker & Nowacki, 2011 ). If the goal is to test the presence of an effect and/or establish some quantitative values related to an effect, then NHST is not the method of choice since testing is conditioned on H0.

While a Bayesian analysis is suited to estimate that the probability that a hypothesis is correct, like NHST, it does not prove a theory on itself, but adds its plausibility ( Lindley, 2000 ). No matter what testing procedure is used and how strong results are, ( Fisher, 1959 p13) reminds us that ‘ […] no isolated experiment, however significant in itself, can suffice for the experimental demonstration of any natural phenomenon'. Similarly, the recent statement of the American Statistical Association ( Wasserstein & Lazar, 2016 ) makes it clear that conclusions should be based on the researchers understanding of the problem in context, along with all summary data and tests, and that no single value (being p-values, Bayesian factor or else) can be used support or invalidate a theory.

What to report and how?

Considering that quantitative reports will always have more information content than binary (significant or not) reports, we can always argue that raw and/or normalized effect size, confidence intervals, or Bayes factor must be reported. Reporting everything can however hinder the communication of the main result(s), and we should aim at giving only the information needed, at least in the core of a manuscript. Here I propose to adopt optimal reporting in the result section to keep the message clear, but have detailed supplementary material. When the hypothesis is about the presence/absence or order of an effect, and providing that a study has sufficient power, NHST is appropriate and it is sufficient to report in the text the actual p-value since it conveys the information needed to rule out equivalence. When the hypothesis and/or the discussion involve some quantitative value, and because p-values do not inform on the effect, it is essential to report on effect sizes ( Lakens, 2013 ), preferably accompanied with confidence or credible intervals. The reasoning is simply that one cannot predict and/or discuss quantities without accounting for variability. For the reader to understand and fully appreciate the results, nothing else is needed.

Because science progress is obtained by cumulating evidence ( Rosenthal, 1991 ), scientists should also consider the secondary use of the data. With today’s electronic articles, there are no reasons for not including all of derived data: mean, standard deviations, effect size, CI, Bayes factor should always be included as supplementary tables (or even better also share raw data). It is also essential to report the context in which tests were performed – that is to report all of the tests performed (all t, F, p values) because of the increase type one error rate due to selective reporting (multiple comparisons and p-hacking problems - Ioannidis, 2005 ). Providing all of this information allows (i) other researchers to directly and effectively compare their results in quantitative terms (replication of effects beyond significance, Open Science Collaboration, 2015 ), (ii) to compute power to future studies ( Lakens & Evers, 2014 ), and (iii) to aggregate results for meta-analyses whilst minimizing publication bias ( van Assen et al. , 2014 ).

[version 3; referees: 1 approved

Funding Statement

The author(s) declared that no grants were involved in supporting this work.

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Referee response for version 3

Dorothy vera margaret bishop.

1 Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK

I can see from the history of this paper that the author has already been very responsive to reviewer comments, and that the process of revising has now been quite protracted.

That makes me reluctant to suggest much more, but I do see potential here for making the paper more impactful. So my overall view is that, once a few typos are fixed (see below), this could be published as is, but I think there is an issue with the potential readership and that further revision could overcome this.

I suspect my take on this is rather different from other reviewers, as I do not regard myself as a statistics expert, though I am on the more quantitative end of the continuum of psychologists and I try to keep up to date. I think I am quite close to the target readership , insofar as I am someone who was taught about statistics ages ago and uses stats a lot, but never got adequate training in the kinds of topic covered by this paper. The fact that I am aware of controversies around the interpretation of confidence intervals etc is simply because I follow some discussions of this on social media. I am therefore very interested to have a clear account of these issues.

This paper contains helpful information for someone in this position, but it is not always clear, and I felt the relevance of some of the content was uncertain. So here are some recommendations:

  • As one previous reviewer noted, it’s questionable that there is a need for a tutorial introduction, and the limited length of this article does not lend itself to a full explanation. So it might be better to just focus on explaining as clearly as possible the problems people have had in interpreting key concepts. I think a title that made it clear this was the content would be more appealing than the current one.
  • P 3, col 1, para 3, last sentence. Although statisticians always emphasise the arbitrary nature of p < .05, we all know that in practice authors who use other values are likely to have their analyses queried. I wondered whether it would be useful here to note that in some disciplines different cutoffs are traditional, e.g. particle physics. Or you could cite David Colquhoun’s paper in which he recommends using p < .001 ( http://rsos.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/1/3/140216) - just to be clear that the traditional p < .05 has been challenged.

What I can’t work out is how you would explain the alpha from Neyman-Pearson in the same way (though I can see from Figure 1 that with N-P you could test an alternative hypothesis, such as the idea that the coin would be heads 75% of the time).

‘By failing to reject, we simply continue to assume that H0 is true, which implies that one cannot….’ have ‘In failing to reject, we do not assume that H0 is true; one cannot argue against a theory from a non-significant result.’

I felt most readers would be interested to read about tests of equivalence and Bayesian approaches, but many would be unfamiliar with these and might like to see an example of how they work in practice – if space permitted.

  • Confidence intervals: I simply could not understand the first sentence – I wondered what was meant by ‘builds’ here. I understand about difficulties in comparing CI across studies when sample sizes differ, but I did not find the last sentence on p 4 easy to understand.
  • P 5: The sentence starting: ‘The alpha value has the same interpretation’ was also hard to understand, especially the term ‘1-alpha CI’. Here too I felt some concrete illustration might be helpful to the reader. And again, I also found the reference to Bayesian intervals tantalising – I think many readers won’t know how to compute these and something like a figure comparing a traditional CI with a Bayesian interval and giving a source for those who want to read on would be very helpful. The reference to ‘credible intervals’ in the penultimate paragraph is very unclear and needs a supporting reference – most readers will not be familiar with this concept.

P 3, col 1, para 2, line 2; “allows us to compute”

P 3, col 2, para 2, ‘probability of replicating’

P 3, col 2, para 2, line 4 ‘informative about’

P 3, col 2, para 4, line 2 delete ‘of’

P 3, col 2, para 5, line 9 – ‘conditioned’ is either wrong or too technical here: would ‘based’ be acceptable as alternative wording

P 3, col 2, para 5, line 13 ‘This dichotomisation allows one to distinguish’

P 3, col 2, para 5, last sentence, delete ‘Alternatively’.

P 3, col 2, last para line 2 ‘first’

P 4, col 2, para 2, last sentence is hard to understand; not sure if this is better: ‘If sample sizes differ between studies, the distribution of CIs cannot be specified a priori’

P 5, col 1, para 2, ‘a pattern of order’ – I did not understand what was meant by this

P 5, col 1, para 2, last sentence unclear: possible rewording: “If the goal is to test the size of an effect then NHST is not the method of choice, since testing can only reject the null hypothesis.’ (??)

P 5, col 1, para 3, line 1 delete ‘that’

P 5, col 1, para 3, line 3 ‘on’ -> ‘by’

P 5, col 2, para 1, line 4 , rather than ‘Here I propose to adopt’ I suggest ‘I recommend adopting’

P 5, col 2, para 1, line 13 ‘with’ -> ‘by’

P 5, col 2, para 1 – recommend deleting last sentence

P 5, col 2, para 2, line 2 ‘consider’ -> ‘anticipate’

P 5, col 2, para 2, delete ‘should always be included’

P 5, col 2, para 2, ‘type one’ -> ‘Type I’

I have read this submission. I believe that I have an appropriate level of expertise to confirm that it is of an acceptable scientific standard, however I have significant reservations, as outlined above.

The University of Edinburgh, UK

I wondered about changing the focus slightly and modifying the title to reflect this to say something like: Null hypothesis significance testing: a guide to commonly misunderstood concepts and recommendations for good practice

Thank you for the suggestion – you indeed saw the intention behind the ‘tutorial’ style of the paper.

  • P 3, col 1, para 3, last sentence. Although statisticians always emphasise the arbitrary nature of p < .05, we all know that in practice authors who use other values are likely to have their analyses queried. I wondered whether it would be useful here to note that in some disciplines different cutoffs are traditional, e.g. particle physics. Or you could cite David Colquhoun’s paper in which he recommends using p < .001 ( http://rsos.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/1/3/140216)  - just to be clear that the traditional p < .05 has been challenged.

I have added a sentence on this citing Colquhoun 2014 and the new Benjamin 2017 on using .005.

I agree that this point is always hard to appreciate, especially because it seems like in practice it makes little difference. I added a paragraph but using reaction times rather than a coin toss – thanks for the suggestion.

Added an example based on new table 1, following figure 1 – giving CI, equivalence tests and Bayes Factor (with refs to easy to use tools)

Changed builds to constructs (this simply means they are something we build) and added that the implication that probability coverage is not warranty when sample size change, is that we cannot compare CI.

I changed ‘ i.e. we accept that 1-alpha CI are wrong in alpha percent of the times in the long run’ to ‘, ‘e.g. a 95% CI is wrong in 5% of the times in the long run (i.e. if we repeat the experiment many times).’ – for Bayesian intervals I simply re-cited Morey & Rouder, 2011.

It is not the CI cannot be specified, it’s that the interval is not predictive of anything anymore! I changed it to ‘If sample sizes, however, differ between studies, there is no warranty that a CI from one study will be true at the rate alpha in a different study, which implies that CI cannot be compared across studies at this is rarely the same sample sizes’

I added (i.e. establish that A > B) – we test that conditions are ordered, but without further specification of the probability of that effect nor its size

Yes it works – thx

P 5, col 2, para 2, ‘type one’ -> ‘Type I’ 

Typos fixed, and suggestions accepted – thanks for that.

Stephen J. Senn

1 Luxembourg Institute of Health, Strassen, L-1445, Luxembourg

The revisions are OK for me, and I have changed my status to Approved.

I have read this submission. I believe that I have an appropriate level of expertise to confirm that it is of an acceptable scientific standard.

Referee response for version 2

On the whole I think that this article is reasonable, my main reservation being that I have my doubts on whether the literature needs yet another tutorial on this subject.

A further reservation I have is that the author, following others, stresses what in my mind is a relatively unimportant distinction between the Fisherian and Neyman-Pearson (NP) approaches. The distinction stressed by many is that the NP approach leads to a dichotomy accept/reject based on probabilities established in advance, whereas the Fisherian approach uses tail area probabilities calculated from the observed statistic. I see this as being unimportant and not even true. Unless one considers that the person carrying out a hypothesis test (original tester) is mandated to come to a conclusion on behalf of all scientific posterity, then one must accept that any remote scientist can come to his or her conclusion depending on the personal type I error favoured. To operate the results of an NP test carried out by the original tester, the remote scientist then needs to know the p-value. The type I error rate is then compared to this to come to a personal accept or reject decision (1). In fact Lehmann (2), who was an important developer of and proponent of the NP system, describes exactly this approach as being good practice. (See Testing Statistical Hypotheses, 2nd edition P70). Thus using tail-area probabilities calculated from the observed statistics does not constitute an operational difference between the two systems.

A more important distinction between the Fisherian and NP systems is that the former does not use alternative hypotheses(3). Fisher's opinion was that the null hypothesis was more primitive than the test statistic but that the test statistic was more primitive than the alternative hypothesis. Thus, alternative hypotheses could not be used to justify choice of test statistic. Only experience could do that.

Further distinctions between the NP and Fisherian approach are to do with conditioning and whether a null hypothesis can ever be accepted.

I have one minor quibble about terminology. As far as I can see, the author uses the usual term 'null hypothesis' and the eccentric term 'nil hypothesis' interchangeably. It would be simpler if the latter were abandoned.

Referee response for version 1

Marcel alm van assen.

1 Department of Methodology and Statistics, Tilburgh University, Tilburg, Netherlands

Null hypothesis significance testing (NHST) is a difficult topic, with misunderstandings arising easily. Many texts, including basic statistics books, deal with the topic, and attempt to explain it to students and anyone else interested. I would refer to a good basic text book, for a detailed explanation of NHST, or to a specialized article when wishing an explaining the background of NHST. So, what is the added value of a new text on NHST? In any case, the added value should be described at the start of this text. Moreover, the topic is so delicate and difficult that errors, misinterpretations, and disagreements are easy. I attempted to show this by giving comments to many sentences in the text.

Abstract: “null hypothesis significance testing is the statistical method of choice in biological, biomedical and social sciences to investigate if an effect is likely”. No, NHST is the method to test the hypothesis of no effect.

Intro: “Null hypothesis significance testing (NHST) is a method of statistical inference by which an observation is tested against a hypothesis of no effect or no relationship.” What is an ‘observation’? NHST is difficult to describe in one sentence, particularly here. I would skip this sentence entirely, here.

Section on Fisher; also explain the one-tailed test.

Section on Fisher; p(Obs|H0) does not reflect the verbal definition (the ‘or more extreme’ part).

Section on Fisher; use a reference and citation to Fisher’s interpretation of the p-value

Section on Fisher; “This was however only intended to be used as an indication that there is something in the data that deserves further investigation. The reason for this is that only H0 is tested whilst the effect under study is not itself being investigated.” First sentence, can you give a reference? Many people say a lot about Fisher’s intentions, but the good man is dead and cannot reply… Second sentence is a bit awkward, because the effect is investigated in a way, by testing the H0.

Section on p-value; Layout and structure can be improved greatly, by first again stating what the p-value is, and then statement by statement, what it is not, using separate lines for each statement. Consider adding that the p-value is randomly distributed under H0 (if all the assumptions of the test are met), and that under H1 the p-value is a function of population effect size and N; the larger each is, the smaller the p-value generally is.

Skip the sentence “If there is no effect, we should replicate the absence of effect with a probability equal to 1-p”. Not insightful, and you did not discuss the concept ‘replicate’ (and do not need to).

Skip the sentence “The total probability of false positives can also be obtained by aggregating results ( Ioannidis, 2005 ).” Not strongly related to p-values, and introduces unnecessary concepts ‘false positives’ (perhaps later useful) and ‘aggregation’.

Consider deleting; “If there is an effect however, the probability to replicate is a function of the (unknown) population effect size with no good way to know this from a single experiment ( Killeen, 2005 ).”

The following sentence; “ Finally, a (small) p-value  is not an indication favouring a hypothesis . A low p-value indicates a misfit of the null hypothesis to the data and cannot be taken as evidence in favour of a specific alternative hypothesis more than any other possible alternatives such as measurement error and selection bias ( Gelman, 2013 ).” is surely not mainstream thinking about NHST; I would surely delete that sentence. In NHST, a p-value is used for testing the H0. Why did you not yet discuss significance level? Yes, before discussing what is not a p-value, I would explain NHST (i.e., what it is and how it is used). 

Also the next sentence “The more (a priori) implausible the alternative hypothesis, the greater the chance that a finding is a false alarm ( Krzywinski & Altman, 2013 ;  Nuzzo, 2014 ).“ is not fully clear to me. This is a Bayesian statement. In NHST, no likelihoods are attributed to hypotheses; the reasoning is “IF H0 is true, then…”.

Last sentence: “As  Nickerson (2000)  puts it ‘theory corroboration requires the testing of multiple predictions because the chance of getting statistically significant results for the wrong reasons in any given case is high’.” What is relation of this sentence to the contents of this section, precisely?

Next section: “For instance, we can estimate that the probability of a given F value to be in the critical interval [+2 +∞] is less than 5%” This depends on the degrees of freedom.

“When there is no effect (H0 is true), the erroneous rejection of H0 is known as type I error and is equal to the p-value.” Strange sentence. The Type I error is the probability of erroneously rejecting the H0 (so, when it is true). The p-value is … well, you explained it before; it surely does not equal the Type I error.

Consider adding a figure explaining the distinction between Fisher’s logic and that of Neyman and Pearson.

“When the test statistics falls outside the critical region(s)” What is outside?

“There is a profound difference between accepting the null hypothesis and simply failing to reject it ( Killeen, 2005 )” I agree with you, but perhaps you may add that some statisticians simply define “accept H0’” as obtaining a p-value larger than the significance level. Did you already discuss the significance level, and it’s mostly used values?

“To accept or reject equally the null hypothesis, Bayesian approaches ( Dienes, 2014 ;  Kruschke, 2011 ) or confidence intervals must be used.” Is ‘reject equally’ appropriate English? Also using Cis, one cannot accept the H0.

Do you start discussing alpha only in the context of Cis?

“CI also indicates the precision of the estimate of effect size, but unless using a percentile bootstrap approach, they require assumptions about distributions which can lead to serious biases in particular regarding the symmetry and width of the intervals ( Wilcox, 2012 ).” Too difficult, using new concepts. Consider deleting.

“Assuming the CI (a)symmetry and width are correct, this gives some indication about the likelihood that a similar value can be observed in future studies, with 95% CI giving about 83% chance of replication success ( Lakens & Evers, 2014 ).” This statement is, in general, completely false. It very much depends on the sample sizes of both studies. If the replication study has a much, much, much larger N, then the probability that the original CI will contain the effect size of the replication approaches (1-alpha)*100%. If the original study has a much, much, much larger N, then the probability that the original Ci will contain the effect size of the replication study approaches 0%.

“Finally, contrary to p-values, CI can be used to accept H0. Typically, if a CI includes 0, we cannot reject H0. If a critical null region is specified rather than a single point estimate, for instance [-2 +2] and the CI is included within the critical null region, then H0 can be accepted. Importantly, the critical region must be specified a priori and cannot be determined from the data themselves.” No. H0 cannot be accepted with Cis.

“The (posterior) probability of an effect can however not be obtained using a frequentist framework.” Frequentist framework? You did not discuss that, yet.

“X% of times the CI obtained will contain the same parameter value”. The same? True, you mean?

“e.g. X% of the times the CI contains the same mean” I do not understand; which mean?

“The alpha value has the same interpretation as when using H0, i.e. we accept that 1-alpha CI are wrong in alpha percent of the times. “ What do you mean, CI are wrong? Consider rephrasing.

“To make a statement about the probability of a parameter of interest, likelihood intervals (maximum likelihood) and credibility intervals (Bayes) are better suited.” ML gives the likelihood of the data given the parameter, not the other way around.

“Many of the disagreements are not on the method itself but on its use.” Bayesians may disagree.

“If the goal is to establish the likelihood of an effect and/or establish a pattern of order, because both requires ruling out equivalence, then NHST is a good tool ( Frick, 1996 )” NHST does not provide evidence on the likelihood of an effect.

“If the goal is to establish some quantitative values, then NHST is not the method of choice.” P-values are also quantitative… this is not a precise sentence. And NHST may be used in combination with effect size estimation (this is even recommended by, e.g., the American Psychological Association (APA)).

“Because results are conditioned on H0, NHST cannot be used to establish beliefs.” It can reinforce some beliefs, e.g., if H0 or any other hypothesis, is true.

“To estimate the probability of a hypothesis, a Bayesian analysis is a better alternative.” It is the only alternative?

“Note however that even when a specific quantitative prediction from a hypothesis is shown to be true (typically testing H1 using Bayes), it does not prove the hypothesis itself, it only adds to its plausibility.” How can we show something is true?

I do not agree on the contents of the last section on ‘minimal reporting’. I prefer ‘optimal reporting’ instead, i.e., the reporting the information that is essential to the interpretation of the result, to any ready, which may have other goals than the writer of the article. This reporting includes, for sure, an estimate of effect size, and preferably a confidence interval, which is in line with recommendations of the APA.

I have read this submission. I believe that I have an appropriate level of expertise to state that I do not consider it to be of an acceptable scientific standard, for reasons outlined above.

The idea of this short review was to point to common interpretation errors (stressing again and again that we are under H0) being in using p-values or CI, and also proposing reporting practices to avoid bias. This is now stated at the end of abstract.

Regarding text books, it is clear that many fail to clearly distinguish Fisher/Pearson/NHST, see Glinet et al (2012) J. Exp Education 71, 83-92. If you have 1 or 2 in mind that you know to be good, I’m happy to include them.

I agree – yet people use it to investigate (not test) if an effect is likely. The issue here is wording. What about adding this distinction at the end of the sentence?: ‘null hypothesis significance testing is the statistical method of choice in biological, biomedical and social sciences used to investigate if an effect is likely, even though it actually tests for the hypothesis of no effect’.

I think a definition is needed, as it offers a starting point. What about the following: ‘NHST is a method of statistical inference by which an experimental factor is tested against a hypothesis of no effect or no relationship based on a given observation’

The section on Fisher has been modified (more or less) as suggested: (1) avoiding talking about one or two tailed tests (2) updating for p(Obs≥t|H0) and (3) referring to Fisher more explicitly (ie pages from articles and book) ; I cannot tell his intentions but these quotes leave little space to alternative interpretations.

The reasoning here is as you state yourself, part 1: ‘a p-value is used for testing the H0; and part 2: ‘no likelihoods are attributed to hypotheses’ it follows we cannot favour a hypothesis. It might seems contentious but this is the case that all we can is to reject the null – how could we favour a specific alternative hypothesis from there? This is explored further down the manuscript (and I now point to that) – note that we do not need to be Bayesian to favour a specific H1, all I’m saying is this cannot be attained with a p-value.

The point was to emphasise that a p value is not there to tell us a given H1 is true and can only be achieved through multiple predictions and experiments. I deleted it for clarity.

This sentence has been removed

Indeed, you are right and I have modified the text accordingly. When there is no effect (H0 is true), the erroneous rejection of H0 is known as type 1 error. Importantly, the type 1 error rate, or alpha value is determined a priori. It is a common mistake but the level of significance (for a given sample) is not the same as the frequency of acceptance alpha found on repeated sampling (Fisher, 1955).

A figure is now presented – with levels of acceptance, critical region, level of significance and p-value.

I should have clarified further here – as I was having in mind tests of equivalence. To clarify, I simply states now: ‘To accept the null hypothesis, tests of equivalence or Bayesian approaches must be used.’

It is now presented in the paragraph before.

Yes, you are right, I completely overlooked this problem. The corrected sentence (with more accurate ref) is now “Assuming the CI (a)symmetry and width are correct, this gives some indication about the likelihood that a similar value can be observed in future studies. For future studies of the same sample size, 95% CI giving about 83% chance of replication success (Cumming and Mallardet, 2006). If sample sizes differ between studies, CI do not however warranty any a priori coverage”.

Again, I had in mind equivalence testing, but in both cases you are right we can only reject and I therefore removed that sentence.

Yes, p-values must be interpreted in context with effect size, but this is not what people do. The point here is to be pragmatic, does and don’t. The sentence was changed.

Not for testing, but for probability, I am not aware of anything else.

Cumulative evidence is, in my opinion, the only way to show it. Even in hard science like physics multiple experiments. In the recent CERN study on finding Higgs bosons, 2 different and complementary experiments ran in parallel – and the cumulative evidence was taken as a proof of the true existence of Higgs bosons.

Daniel Lakens

1 School of Innovation Sciences, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, Netherlands

I appreciate the author's attempt to write a short tutorial on NHST. Many people don't know how to use it, so attempts to educate people are always worthwhile. However, I don't think the current article reaches it's aim. For one, I think it might be practically impossible to explain a lot in such an ultra short paper - every section would require more than 2 pages to explain, and there are many sections. Furthermore, there are some excellent overviews, which, although more extensive, are also much clearer (e.g., Nickerson, 2000 ). Finally, I found many statements to be unclear, and perhaps even incorrect (noted below). Because there is nothing worse than creating more confusion on such a topic, I have extremely high standards before I think such a short primer should be indexed. I note some examples of unclear or incorrect statements below. I'm sorry I can't make a more positive recommendation.

“investigate if an effect is likely” – ambiguous statement. I think you mean, whether the observed DATA is probable, assuming there is no effect?

The Fisher (1959) reference is not correct – Fischer developed his method much earlier.

“This p-value thus reflects the conditional probability of achieving the observed outcome or larger, p(Obs|H0)” – please add 'assuming the null-hypothesis is true'.

“p(Obs|H0)” – explain this notation for novices.

“Following Fisher, the smaller the p-value, the greater the likelihood that the null hypothesis is false.”  This is wrong, and any statement about this needs to be much more precise. I would suggest direct quotes.

“there is something in the data that deserves further investigation” –unclear sentence.

“The reason for this” – unclear what ‘this’ refers to.

“ not the probability of the null hypothesis of being true, p(H0)” – second of can be removed?

“Any interpretation of the p-value in relation to the effect under study (strength, reliability, probability) is indeed

wrong, since the p-value is conditioned on H0”  - incorrect. A big problem is that it depends on the sample size, and that the probability of a theory depends on the prior.

“If there is no effect, we should replicate the absence of effect with a probability equal to 1-p.” I don’t understand this, but I think it is incorrect.

“The total probability of false positives can also be obtained by aggregating results (Ioannidis, 2005).” Unclear, and probably incorrect.

“By failing to reject, we simply continue to assume that H0 is true, which implies that one cannot, from a nonsignificant result, argue against a theory” – according to which theory? From a NP perspective, you can ACT as if the theory is false.

“(Lakens & Evers, 2014”) – we are not the original source, which should be cited instead.

“ Typically, if a CI includes 0, we cannot reject H0.”  - when would this not be the case? This assumes a CI of 1-alpha.

“If a critical null region is specified rather than a single point estimate, for instance [-2 +2] and the CI is included within the critical null region, then H0 can be accepted.” – you mean practically, or formally? I’m pretty sure only the former.

The section on ‘The (correct) use of NHST’ seems to conclude only Bayesian statistics should be used. I don’t really agree.

“ we can always argue that effect size, power, etc. must be reported.” – which power? Post-hoc power? Surely not? Other types are unknown. So what do you mean?

The recommendation on what to report remains vague, and it is unclear why what should be reported.

This sentence was changed, following as well the other reviewer, to ‘null hypothesis significance testing is the statistical method of choice in biological, biomedical and social sciences to investigate if an effect is likely, even though it actually tests whether the observed data are probable, assuming there is no effect’

Changed, refers to Fisher 1925

I changed a little the sentence structure, which should make explicit that this is the condition probability.

This has been changed to ‘[…] to decide whether the evidence is worth additional investigation and/or replication (Fisher, 1971 p13)’

my mistake – the sentence structure is now ‘ not the probability of the null hypothesis p(H0), of being true,’ ; hope this makes more sense (and this way refers back to p(Obs>t|H0)

Fair enough – my point was to stress the fact that p value and effect size or H1 have very little in common, but yes that the part in common has to do with sample size. I left the conditioning on H0 but also point out the dependency on sample size.

The whole paragraph was changed to reflect a more philosophical take on scientific induction/reasoning. I hope this is clearer.

Changed to refer to equivalence testing

I rewrote this, as to show frequentist analysis can be used  - I’m trying to sell Bayes more than any other approach.

I’m arguing we should report it all, that’s why there is no exhausting list – I can if needed.

Null Hypothesis and Alternative Hypothesis

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Hypothesis testing involves the careful construction of two statements: the null hypothesis and the alternative hypothesis. These hypotheses can look very similar but are actually different.

How do we know which hypothesis is the null and which one is the alternative? We will see that there are a few ways to tell the difference.

The Null Hypothesis

The null hypothesis reflects that there will be no observed effect in our experiment. In a mathematical formulation of the null hypothesis, there will typically be an equal sign. This hypothesis is denoted by H 0 .

The null hypothesis is what we attempt to find evidence against in our hypothesis test. We hope to obtain a small enough p-value that it is lower than our level of significance alpha and we are justified in rejecting the null hypothesis. If our p-value is greater than alpha, then we fail to reject the null hypothesis.

If the null hypothesis is not rejected, then we must be careful to say what this means. The thinking on this is similar to a legal verdict. Just because a person has been declared "not guilty", it does not mean that he is innocent. In the same way, just because we failed to reject a null hypothesis it does not mean that the statement is true.

For example, we may want to investigate the claim that despite what convention has told us, the mean adult body temperature is not the accepted value of 98.6 degrees Fahrenheit . The null hypothesis for an experiment to investigate this is “The mean adult body temperature for healthy individuals is 98.6 degrees Fahrenheit.” If we fail to reject the null hypothesis, then our working hypothesis remains that the average adult who is healthy has a temperature of 98.6 degrees. We do not prove that this is true.

If we are studying a new treatment, the null hypothesis is that our treatment will not change our subjects in any meaningful way. In other words, the treatment will not produce any effect in our subjects.

The Alternative Hypothesis

The alternative or experimental hypothesis reflects that there will be an observed effect for our experiment. In a mathematical formulation of the alternative hypothesis, there will typically be an inequality, or not equal to symbol. This hypothesis is denoted by either H a or by H 1 .

The alternative hypothesis is what we are attempting to demonstrate in an indirect way by the use of our hypothesis test. If the null hypothesis is rejected, then we accept the alternative hypothesis. If the null hypothesis is not rejected, then we do not accept the alternative hypothesis. Going back to the above example of mean human body temperature, the alternative hypothesis is “The average adult human body temperature is not 98.6 degrees Fahrenheit.”

If we are studying a new treatment, then the alternative hypothesis is that our treatment does, in fact, change our subjects in a meaningful and measurable way.

The following set of negations may help when you are forming your null and alternative hypotheses. Most technical papers rely on just the first formulation, even though you may see some of the others in a statistics textbook.

  • Null hypothesis: “ x is equal to y .” Alternative hypothesis “ x is not equal to y .”
  • Null hypothesis: “ x is at least y .” Alternative hypothesis “ x is less than y .”
  • Null hypothesis: “ x is at most y .” Alternative hypothesis “ x is greater than y .”
  • Null Hypothesis Examples
  • An Example of a Hypothesis Test
  • Hypothesis Test for the Difference of Two Population Proportions
  • What Is a P-Value?
  • How to Conduct a Hypothesis Test
  • Hypothesis Test Example
  • Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs Explained
  • Chi-Square Goodness of Fit Test
  • What Level of Alpha Determines Statistical Significance?
  • Popular Math Terms and Definitions
  • How to Do Hypothesis Tests With the Z.TEST Function in Excel
  • The Difference Between Type I and Type II Errors in Hypothesis Testing
  • Type I and Type II Errors in Statistics
  • The Runs Test for Random Sequences
  • What 'Fail to Reject' Means in a Hypothesis Test
  • What Is the Difference Between Alpha and P-Values?

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9.1 Null and Alternative Hypotheses

The actual test begins by considering two hypotheses . They are called the null hypothesis and the alternative hypothesis . These hypotheses contain opposing viewpoints.

H 0 : The null hypothesis: It is a statement of no difference between the variables—they are not related. This can often be considered the status quo and as a result if you cannot accept the null it requires some action.

H a : The alternative hypothesis: It is a claim about the population that is contradictory to H 0 and what we conclude when we reject H 0 . This is usually what the researcher is trying to prove.

Since the null and alternative hypotheses are contradictory, you must examine evidence to decide if you have enough evidence to reject the null hypothesis or not. The evidence is in the form of sample data.

After you have determined which hypothesis the sample supports, you make a decision. There are two options for a decision. They are "reject H 0 " if the sample information favors the alternative hypothesis or "do not reject H 0 " or "decline to reject H 0 " if the sample information is insufficient to reject the null hypothesis.

Mathematical Symbols Used in H 0 and H a :

H 0 always has a symbol with an equal in it. H a never has a symbol with an equal in it. The choice of symbol depends on the wording of the hypothesis test. However, be aware that many researchers (including one of the co-authors in research work) use = in the null hypothesis, even with > or < as the symbol in the alternative hypothesis. This practice is acceptable because we only make the decision to reject or not reject the null hypothesis.

Example 9.1

H 0 : No more than 30% of the registered voters in Santa Clara County voted in the primary election. p ≤ .30 H a : More than 30% of the registered voters in Santa Clara County voted in the primary election. p > 30

A medical trial is conducted to test whether or not a new medicine reduces cholesterol by 25%. State the null and alternative hypotheses.

Example 9.2

We want to test whether the mean GPA of students in American colleges is different from 2.0 (out of 4.0). The null and alternative hypotheses are: H 0 : μ = 2.0 H a : μ ≠ 2.0

We want to test whether the mean height of eighth graders is 66 inches. State the null and alternative hypotheses. Fill in the correct symbol (=, ≠, ≥, <, ≤, >) for the null and alternative hypotheses.

  • H 0 : μ __ 66
  • H a : μ __ 66

Example 9.3

We want to test if college students take less than five years to graduate from college, on the average. The null and alternative hypotheses are: H 0 : μ ≥ 5 H a : μ < 5

We want to test if it takes fewer than 45 minutes to teach a lesson plan. State the null and alternative hypotheses. Fill in the correct symbol ( =, ≠, ≥, <, ≤, >) for the null and alternative hypotheses.

  • H 0 : μ __ 45
  • H a : μ __ 45

Example 9.4

In an issue of U. S. News and World Report , an article on school standards stated that about half of all students in France, Germany, and Israel take advanced placement exams and a third pass. The same article stated that 6.6% of U.S. students take advanced placement exams and 4.4% pass. Test if the percentage of U.S. students who take advanced placement exams is more than 6.6%. State the null and alternative hypotheses. H 0 : p ≤ 0.066 H a : p > 0.066

On a state driver’s test, about 40% pass the test on the first try. We want to test if more than 40% pass on the first try. Fill in the correct symbol (=, ≠, ≥, <, ≤, >) for the null and alternative hypotheses.

  • H 0 : p __ 0.40
  • H a : p __ 0.40

Collaborative Exercise

Bring to class a newspaper, some news magazines, and some Internet articles . In groups, find articles from which your group can write null and alternative hypotheses. Discuss your hypotheses with the rest of the class.

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Null Hypothesis H 0: The correlation in the population is zero: ρ = 0. Alternative Hypothesis H A: The correlation in the population is not zero: ρ ≠ 0. For all these cases, the analysts define the hypotheses before the study. After collecting the data, they perform a hypothesis test to determine whether they can reject the null hypothesis.

A null hypothesis is rejected if the measured data is significantly unlikely to have occurred and a null hypothesis is accepted if the observed outcome is consistent with the position held by the null hypothesis. Rejecting the null hypothesis sets the stage for further experimentation to see if a relationship between two variables exists.

The null hypothesis is the claim that there's no effect in the population. If the sample provides enough evidence against the claim that there's no effect in the population (p ≤ α), then we can reject the null hypothesis. Otherwise, we fail to reject the null hypothesis. Although "fail to reject" may sound awkward, it's the only ...

A hypothesis test is a formal statistical test we use to reject or fail to reject a statistical hypothesis. We always use the following steps to perform a hypothesis test: Step 1: State the null and alternative hypotheses. The null hypothesis, denoted as H0, is the hypothesis that the sample data occurs purely from chance.

For many tests, you can use a p-value (short for "probability value") to support or reject the null hypothesis. If the p-value is low enough (more on that below), you can reject the null hypothesis. This is sometimes referred to as " If the p is low the null must go " [2]. The p-value approach is effective whether you've been given a ...

Use the P-Value method to support or reject null hypothesis. Step 1: State the null hypothesis and the alternate hypothesis ("the claim"). H o :p ≤ 0.23; H 1 :p > 0.23 (claim) Step 2: Compute by dividing the number of positive respondents from the number in the random sample: 63 / 210 = 0.3. Step 3: Find 'p' by converting the stated ...

Basic definitions. The null hypothesis and the alternative hypothesis are types of conjectures used in statistical tests to make statistical inferences, which are formal methods of reaching conclusions and separating scientific claims from statistical noise.. The statement being tested in a test of statistical significance is called the null hypothesis. . The test of significance is designed ...

Table of contents. Step 1: State your null and alternate hypothesis. Step 2: Collect data. Step 3: Perform a statistical test. Step 4: Decide whether to reject or fail to reject your null hypothesis. Step 5: Present your findings. Other interesting articles. Frequently asked questions about hypothesis testing.

Review. In a hypothesis test, sample data is evaluated in order to arrive at a decision about some type of claim.If certain conditions about the sample are satisfied, then the claim can be evaluated for a population. In a hypothesis test, we: Evaluate the null hypothesis, typically denoted with \(H_{0}\).The null is not rejected unless the hypothesis test shows otherwise.

Let's return finally to the question of whether we reject or fail to reject the null hypothesis. If our statistical analysis shows that the significance level is below the cut-off value we have set (e.g., either 0.05 or 0.01), we reject the null hypothesis and accept the alternative hypothesis. Alternatively, if the significance level is above ...

The p value is a number, calculated from a statistical test, that describes how likely you are to have found a particular set of observations if the null hypothesis were true. P values are used in hypothesis testing to help decide whether to reject the null hypothesis. The smaller the p value, the more likely you are to reject the null ...

A crucial step in null hypothesis testing is finding the likelihood of the sample result if the null hypothesis were true. This probability is called the p value. A low p value means that the sample result would be unlikely if the null hypothesis were true and leads to the rejection of the null hypothesis. A high p value means that the sample ...

Null Hypothesis Overview. The null hypothesis, H 0 is the commonly accepted fact; it is the opposite of the alternate hypothesis. Researchers work to reject, nullify or disprove the null hypothesis. Researchers come up with an alternate hypothesis, one that they think explains a phenomenon, and then work to reject the null hypothesis.

The actual test begins by considering two hypotheses.They are called the null hypothesis and the alternative hypothesis.These hypotheses contain opposing viewpoints. H 0, the —null hypothesis: a statement of no difference between sample means or proportions or no difference between a sample mean or proportion and a population mean or proportion. In other words, the difference equals 0.

In hypothesis testing, the goal is to see if there is sufficient statistical evidence to reject a presumed null hypothesis in favor of a conjectured alternative hypothesis.The null hypothesis is usually denoted \(H_0\) while the alternative hypothesis is usually denoted \(H_1\). An hypothesis test is a statistical decision; the conclusion will either be to reject the null hypothesis in favor ...

Key Takeaways: The Null Hypothesis. • In a test of significance, the null hypothesis states that there is no meaningful relationship between two measured phenomena. • By comparing the null hypothesis to an alternative hypothesis, scientists can either reject or fail to reject the null hypothesis. • The null hypothesis cannot be positively ...

The Logic of Null Hypothesis Testing. Null hypothesis testing (often called null hypothesis significance testing or NHST) is a formal approach to deciding between two interpretations of a statistical relationship in a sample. One interpretation is called the null hypothesis (often symbolized H0 and read as "H-zero").

Abstract: "null hypothesis significance testing is the statistical method of choice in biological, biomedical and social sciences to investigate if an effect is likely". No, NHST is the method to test the hypothesis of no effect. I agree - yet people use it to investigate (not test) if an effect is likely.

Alternative hypothesis " x is not equal to y .". Null hypothesis: " x is at least y .". Alternative hypothesis " x is less than y .". Null hypothesis: " x is at most y .". Alternative hypothesis " x is greater than y .". Here are the differences between the null and alternative hypotheses and how to distinguish between them.

The actual test begins by considering two hypotheses.They are called the null hypothesis and the alternative hypothesis.These hypotheses contain opposing viewpoints. H 0: The null hypothesis: It is a statement of no difference between the variables—they are not related. This can often be considered the status quo and as a result if you cannot accept the null it requires some action.

Define Hypothesis. Be the first to add your personal experience. 2. Choose Test. Be the first to add your personal experience. 3. Set Significance. Be the first to add your personal experience. 4.

P-value: The p-value is the probability of obtaining a sample outcome as extreme as, or more extreme than, the observed outcome, assuming that the null hypothesis is true. It provides a measure of the strength of evidence against the null hypothesis. The test being one or two-tailed is related to the critical region because it determines ...

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"I sold my 2019 Axopar 28c through JBY and then purchased a new 37xc from them. Great group to work with!"

"We purchased a pre-owned Axopar 28 from Jeff, and we had a great experience. He was very knowledgeable and committed to making the purchase process easy."

"We can’t speak highly enough of our experience with Jeff Brown Yachts and the Mari~Time program."

– The Austin Family

"Jeff’s professional and proficient handling of our transaction, and then spending a great deal of time familiarizing and training our family has been invaluable. We recommend him highly to anyone looking to buy or sell."

– Mark & Claire M

"I trust Jeff’s integrity and professional counsel in all boating needs. I recommend him to anyone needing sound and professional advice in buying or selling boats."

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  • Axopar Seattle

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Axopar Destination Transit Guide

Year-round adventure is never far away.

jeff brown yachts axopar

Easy access to some of the world’s greatest cruising destinations is one of the great benefits of boating on the Salish Sea. And, each Axopar model provides you the room and comfort to share and enjoy those adventures all year long. Hike, fish, camp, bike, kayak, water ski, stay at your favorite hotel, catch a show or grab dinner across the sound, the possibilities are endless. 

With that in mind, we collected transit times from Seattle to some of our favorite area destinations at cruising speed in an Axopar. Enjoy the ride.

@30 knots | Seattle to 

Winslow | Eagle Harbor - 15 minutes Poulsbo - 25 minutes Bremerton - 25 minutes Tacoma - 45 minutes Port Townsend - 1 hour Hoodsport - 1 hour 40 minutes Friday Harbor - 2 hours Anacortes - 2 hours Victoria - 2 hours Bellingham - 2 hours 25 minutes Vancouver - 3 hours 45 minutes Princess Louisa Inlet - 6 hours

Use our Axopar Boat Configurator to build your dream boat.

View our Axopar offerings, including Axopar 28, Axopar 28 Cabin, Axopar 37XC Cross Cabin, used Axopars and more.

Subscribe to Axopar Seattle

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whatever the adventure, we will take you there!

Live your adventure together with us, axopar boats.

Axopar is a globally renowned Finnish brand of premium range, multi-award-winning motorboats, developed through a passion for adventure and the outdoors for you to experience more timeless moments.

Brabus Marine Superboats

High-performance Brabus Marine’s Shadow Superboats: 1200 Range 1000 Range 900 Range 500 Range 300 Range

Axopar Models

Axopar 45 Range Axopar 37 Range Axopar 29 Range Axopar 25 Range Axopar 22 Range

Axopar Awards

The brand is honored to be presented with awards from European Power Boat of the Year, Japan’s Boat of the Year, Boat of the Year, Motor Boats Award, Boat of the Year Award in USA, International Best of Boats Winner, Marine Industry Customer Satisfaction Index Award, and Boat Builder Awards.

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In the world of yacht brokerage, each journey is unique, and mine has been a captivating ride from roads to waters. I am Nate Evans, a seasoned entrepreneur with a background in the automotive service industry; I’m excited to share my story and why I chose to embark on the maritime adventure with Jeff Brown Yachts.

From Roads to Waters: The Evolution

Growing up on the water in Wilmington, North Carolina, instilled in me a deep appreciation for the maritime world. With over two decades of experience in the automotive service industry, I found myself yearning for a new challenge. The transition from car engines to marine engines was a natural evolution, guided by a genuine passion for the sea.

Discovering the Axopar Culture

The pivotal moment occurred at the 2020 International Boat Show in Dusseldorf, Germany. The Axopar culture instantly resonated with me, offering not just a boat but a lifestyle. Connecting with Jeff Brown and sharing our enthusiasm for nautical adventures, I knew I had found an amazing team with JBY, Axopar and Brabus Marine.

Client-Centric Approach: More Than Just Transactions

What sets the journey with Jeff Brown Yachts apart is the commitment to clients as individuals. Purchasing a yacht is more than a financial transaction; it’s a lifestyle choice. Understanding this, I take the time to delve into the unique boating desires of each client. The goal is not just to meet expectations but to exceed them through high ethical standards, hard work, and unwavering integrity.

Embark on Your Maritime Journey

For those eager to commence their maritime journey with me at Jeff Brown Yachts, I invite you to reach out at (910) 612-7651 and you can expect a personalized experience dedicated to making your nautical dreams a reality.

Cheers to new adventures ,

The Ultimate Boating Experience

The axopar range – let your adventure begin.

Axopar’s unique configurations allow you explore a variety of options for each range such as aft deck modules, open aft, wet bar and multi-storage.

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Call Nate to start your adventure today!

(910) 612-7651

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Luxury rules at the moscow yacht show.

by Maria Sapozhnikova

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The windy Russian autumn weather might be a little bit tricky for sailing, but it doesn’t stop brave yachtsmen from all over the world from flocking to Russian capital in the beginning of September when the Moscow Yacht Show commences. The main Russian Yacht exhibition gathers professional and amateur yacht lovers together under the wing of The Royal Yacht Club.

This year it took place for a fourth time already. The exhibition is considered the principal event on the sporting and social calendar. The Moscow Yacht Show 2010 united in one area three of the largest Russian yachts distributors: Ultramarine, Nordmarine and Premium Yachts.

A wide range of yachts were on display for a week. An exhibition showcased yachts both from Russian manufacturers and world famous brands: Azimut, Princess, Ferretti, Pershing, Riviera, Doral, Linssen, etc.

It was a real feast for seafarers as visitors of the show had a unique chance not only to take a look at the newest superyachts before they hit the market, but also to evaluate their driving advantages during the test drive. The show provided an excellent opportunity for yacht enthusiasts to choose and buy a new boat for the next season.

The event started with the grandiose gala evening. It included grand dinner, the concert and professional awards ceremony for achievements in Russian yachting industry. The guests also enjoyed the annual regatta.

Special guest Paolo Vitelli, Azimut Benetti Group president, opened the evening.

Next year organizers assured guests they would bring more yachts, the scale of which will even make oligarch Roman Abramovich envious. Sounds very promising indeed.

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Jeff Kline DDS

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Welcome to the office of Jeff Kline!  We are so happy you found us!   Our entire team is committed to providing comprehensive, high-quality dental care in a relaxed, friendly environment.   Our patients are as diverse as the population of the Palouse:  kids, seniors, athletes, foreign students and busy professionals.  Thanks to our wonderful family of patients, we have developed a reputation of compassion, honesty, and integrity within our community.

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jeff brown yachts axopar

As the Axopar West Coast dealer, Jeff Brown Yachts proudly presents the revolutionary Axoper lineup, offering advanced hydrodynamic efficiency, extended range, comfort, and adventure-ready features. We operate from six offices in San Diego, Newport Beach, Sausalito, Seattle, Kailua-Kona, and Wrightsville Beach. https://jeffbrownyachts.com ...

Axopar Destination Transit Guide Year-round adventure is never far away . ... Subscribe to the Jeff Brown Yachts Newsletter. San Diego Marina Office 2614 Shelter Island Drive, Suite A San Diego CA, U.S. 92106 619-222-9899. Newport Harbor Office 2507 West Coast Highway, Suite 101

Axopar 37 Range Axopar 37 XC Cross Cabin Axopar 37 Sun-Top Axopar 37 Spyder Axopar 28 Range Axopar 28 Cabin Axopar 28 T-Top Axopar 28 Open ... Jeff Brown Yachts San Diego - Main Office 2330 Shelter Island Drive Suite 105 San Diego CA, U.S. 92106 (619) 222-9899 (619) 709-0697 https://jeffbrownyachts.com

Axopar 45 Range Axopar 45 XC Cross Cabin Axopar 37 Range Axopar 37 XC Cross Cabin Axopar 37 Sun-Top Axopar 37 Spyder Axopar 28 Range ... Jeff Brown Yachts San Francisco 298 Harbor Drive Sausalito, CA 94965 (415) 887-9347 https://jeffbrownyachts.com Instagram Facebook Youtube LinkedIn.

The all-new Axopar 29 range embodies Axopar's unwavering determination and resilience to continually push the boundaries of innovation in design, efficiency,...

The Axopar 37 Angler is a result of decades of fishing experience from the team at Jeff Brown Yachts. It's loaded with innovative features for the offshore A...

2024 AXOPAR SEASON KICKS OFF WITH 3 BOAT SHOWS~ CHARLESTON, VIRGINIA BEACH, & CHARLOTTE. Here's your chance to get a closer look at the versatile Axopar 28 and 37 models, plus, the BRABUS Shadow 500 Cabin. We'll see you in Charleston, Jan. 26-28, at the Mid-Atlantic Sports & Boat Show, in Virginia Beach, Feb 2-4, and Charlotte Feb 8-11.

Jeff Brown Yachts bespoke brokerage and yacht sales jeffbrownyachts.com Jeff Brown Yachts is the exclusive West Coast dealer for Axopar, BRABUS Marine, Pardo Yachts, Pearl Yachts, Sirena Yachts ...

Find 197 used Axopar for sale in your area & across the world on YachtWorld. Offering the best selection of boats to choose from. ... Offered By: Jeff Brown Yachts. Contact. Video. 2021 Axopar 37 XC CROSS CABIN. US$379,000* Price Drop: US$20,000 (Jul 19) US $3,227/mo. Sausalito, California. 37ft - 2021. Offered By: Jeff Brown Yachts.

24 likes, 0 comments - jeffbrownyachts on March 16, 2024: "Just in time for summer! Available Now - The only "Multi Storage" Axopar 37 BRABUS trim on the West ...

Axopar 45 Range Axopar 45 XC Cross Cabin Axopar 45 Cross Top Axopar 45 Sun-Top Axopar 37 Range ... Jeff Brown Yachts JBY Mid-Atlantic Office 6 Marina Street, Suite 1 Wrightsville Beach, NC 28480 (910) 660-1107 https://jeffbrownyachts.com Manitowoc Marina 425 Maritime Dr, Manitowoc, WI 54220, USA ...

Axopar Boats Axopar is a globally renowned Finnish brand of premium range, multi-award-winning motorboats, developed through a passion for adventure and the outdoors for you to experience more timeless moments. ... For those eager to commence their maritime journey with me at Jeff Brown Yachts, I invite you to reach out at (910) 612-7651 and ...

The windy Russian autumn weather might be a little bit tricky for sailing, but it doesn't stop brave yachtsmen from all over the world from flocking to Russian capital in the beginning of ...

Every yacht for sale in moscow listed here. Every boat has beautiful hi-res images, deck-plans, detailed descriptions & videos.

Jeff Kline DDS. Menu. Our Location; About Dr. Kline; Contact; Blog; Services; Insurance/Financial; Welcome! 208-882-0991. Welcome! Welcome to the office of Jeff Kline! We are so happy you found us! Our entire team is committed to providing comprehensive, high-quality dental care in a relaxed, friendly environment.

Elektrostal Geography. Geographic Information regarding City of Elektrostal. Elektrostal Geographical coordinates. Latitude: 55.8, Longitude: 38.45. 55° 48′ 0″ North, 38° 27′ 0″ East. Elektrostal Area. 4,951 hectares. 49.51 km² (19.12 sq mi) Elektrostal Altitude.

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Lurssen delivers 136m superyacht Flying Fox for serial owner

  • Lurssen delivers 136m superyacht Flying Fox for serial owner
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47m Serenissima I Listed For Sale

IMAGES

  1. Review: Trinity 161' "Destination Fox Harb'r Too"

    fox harbour yacht

  2. 136m Flying Fox: inside the world’s 16th largest superyacht

    fox harbour yacht

  3. Charter Yacht 'DESTINATION FOX HARB’R TOO' in Toronto

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  4. Sailing yacht DESTINATION FOX HARBR

    fox harbour yacht

  5. Review: Trinity 161' "Destination Fox Harb'r Too"

    fox harbour yacht

  6. 136m Flying Fox: inside the world’s 16th largest superyacht

    fox harbour yacht

COMMENTS

  1. Yacht DESTINATION FOX HARBR, Alloy Yachts

    The large luxury yacht DESTINATION FOX HARB'R is a sailing yacht. This 41 metre (135 ft) luxury yacht was made by Alloy Yachts in 2002. DESTINATION FOX HARB'R was previously called Harlequin. Superyacht DESTINATION FOX HARB'R is a stylish yacht that can accommodate a total of 8 people on board and has a total of 6 crew.

  2. Destination Fox Harb'r Too Motor Yacht

    Destination Fox Harb'r Too is available for charter in the Caribbean during winter months, and the Mediterranean in summer. The yacht is crewed by 10 professional crew members including a 5-star Chef and three hostesses and a watersports guide to ensure that all of your needs are exceeded. The split-level owner's suite offers magnificent 180 ...

  3. DESTINATION FOX HARB'R TOO Motor Yacht TRINITY 161' 2008

    DESTINATION FOX HARB'R TOO - 2008 TRINITY 161' Tri-Deck. CONTACT Similar Listings For Sale New Search. DESTINATION FOX HARB'R TOO is a 161' (49.07m) Tri-Deck Motor Yacht built by TRINITY and delivered in 2008. Photos and specifications available below. Find yachts and boats listed for sale and ones off the market in our YATCO Yacht & Boat ...

  4. Outdoor Activities

    Fox Harb'r Resort offers more activities for our enjoyment than just phenomenal golf and an award winning spa. Explore our glorious land and partake in exhilarating sport shooting, axe throwing, archery, kayaking, hiking, biking, and fresh air sightseeing pontoon & yacht tours. Try your hand at pickle ball, tennis,or horseshoes.

  5. 49.1m Mustang Sally Superyacht

    Motor yacht Destination Fox Harb'r Too is the latest launch from Trinity's 28-foot-beam series which originated with Zoom Zoom Zoom in 2005. This 2008 model was built for Canadian entrepreneur Ron Joyce who was looking to add a large motor yacht to his already three-strong superyacht fleet. At the time, Trinity Yachts was 80 percent through ...

  6. Fox Harb'r Resort

    Embracing Nova Scotia's dramatic Northumberland Coast, Fox Harb'r Resort offers timeless luxury in an unexpected place. Founded by legendary entrepreneur Ron Joyce, here you'll experience world-class golf, exquisite dining, luxurious spa and exciting outdoor adventures, as well as intimate and expansive spaces for meetings, weddings and celebrations — all enriched by our warm and ...

  7. Shore to Shore : Nova Scotia Luxury Accommodations Guest Suites

    Discover the awe-inspiring beauty of our Shore to Shore escape! Immerse yourself in the stunning landscapes, spanning from the enchanting Northumberland Shore to the picturesque coastline of PEI, all while enjoying the luxuries of Fox Harb'r Resort. Book your escape now for stays between June 14 - September 28, 2024. Call 1-866-257-1801.

  8. Destination Fox Harb'r Too Motor Yacht

    Destination Fox Harb'r Too is available for charter in the Caribbean during winter months, and the Mediterranean in summer. The yacht is crewed by 10 professional crew members including a 5-star Chef and three hostesses and a watersports guide to ensure that all of your needs are exceeded. The split-level owner's suite offers magnificent 180 ...

  9. Luxury Motor Yacht 'DESTINATION FOX HARB'R TOO ...

    The 49m superyacht 'DESTINATION FOX HARB'R TOO' has been renamed MUSTANG SALLY and will remain in the charter fleet. Delivered by Trinity Yachts in 2008, motor yacht MUSTANG SALLY offers the best luxury amenities available on the market for winter charters in the Caribbean. A ship-wide music system, 8-person deck Jacuzzi, barbecue and swimming ...

  10. Destination Fox Harbr Too

    Destination Fox Harb'r Too is available for charter in the Caribbean during winter months, and the Mediterranean in summer. The yacht is crewed by 10 professional crew members including a 5-star Chef and three hostesses and a watersports guide to ensure that all of your needs are exceeded. The split-level owner's suite offers magnificent 180 ...

  11. Amazon disclaims Jeff Bezos' ownership of 136m ...

    Amazon disclaims Jeff Bezos' ownership of 136m superyacht Flying Fox. One of the most prominent deliveries of 2019, the 136-metre Lürssen superyacht Flying Fox has recently caused vast social media buzz, rumouring the vessel belongs to the world's richest person, Jeff Bezos. According to Business Insider, a representative of Amazon ...

  12. Trinity superyacht Destination Fox Harb'r Too now for sale at IYC

    It's another central agency change here as Mark Elliott at International Yacht Collection takes over the listing for sale of the 49 metre motor yacht Destination Fox Harb'r Too.. Built by US superyacht yard Trinity Yachts to ABS class, Destination Fox Harb'r Too was delivered in 2008 as a tri-deck Trinity 161 model. Designed by Geoff Van Aller, her interior is by Patrick Knowles, and she can ...

  13. Charter Yacht 'DESTINATION FOX HARB'R TOO' in Toronto

    The 49.1 metre charter yacht 'Destination Fox Harb'r Too' was built in 2008 and is a Trinity Yachts charter yacht.. Featuring naval architecture by the shipyard and exterior styling by Geoff Van Aller, she is ABS classed and MCA compliant.. Her interior, desgined by Patrick Knowles, offers accommodation for up to 11 charter guests in five staterooms - a master suite, three double staterooms ...

  14. Inside Pendennis' 35m Project Fox

    The 35m expedition style yacht Project Fox, which is currently in build at Pendennis' Falmouth facility, became the first yacht for sale during build in shipyards history. The 35m explorer is aptly named after one of Falmouth's most famous sons: Robert Were Fox the Younger. He was a 19th-century...

  15. Flying Fox: Inside the largest charter superyacht

    Flying Fox, the 136-meter Lurssen superyacht is ready to set new standards for what's possible to get on charters. 14th largest yacht in the world, she was designed by Espen Oeino and Mark Berryman with Imperial overseeing the construction. The curved lines of the hull and an unusual shade of gray,...

  16. Real Estate at Nova Scotia's Fox Harb'r Resort

    Joining the community at Fox Harb'r gives you access to unparalleled amenities that no other resort in Atlantic Canada can equal. Whether you arrive by car, yacht at the deep water marina or plan on the private jetway, you can be teeing off on the Graham Cooke designed Championship golf course within minutes.

  17. royal north sea yacht club oostende restaurant

    The restaurant, has a 30 persons capacity A sun terrace of 150 m² ... ROYAL NORTH SEA YACHT CLUB OOSTENDE. Montgomerykaai 1 8400 Oostende Belgi ..... Royal North Sea Yacht Club. Claimed. Review. Save. Share. 49 reviews #253 of 343 Restaurants in Ostend $$ - $$$ Belgian European. Montgomerykaai 1, Ostend 8400 Belgium +32 59 70 27 54 Website + Add hours Improve this listing.

  18. Motor yacht Flying Fox

    About Flying Fox. Flying Fox is a 136 m / 446′3″ luxury motor yacht. She was built by Lurssen in 2018. With a beam of 22.5 m and a draft of 5.1 m, she has a steel hull and aluminium superstructure. This adds up to a gross tonnage of 9022 tons. She is powered by MTU engines of 6000 hp each giving her a maximum speed of 20 knots and a ...

  19. Moscow Oblast

    Moscow Oblast ( Russian: Моско́вская о́бласть, Moskovskaya oblast) is a federal subject of Russia. It is located in western Russia, and it completely surrounds Moscow. The oblast has no capital, and oblast officials reside in Moscow or in other cities within the oblast. [1] As of 2015, the oblast has a population of 7,231,068 ...

  20. jeff brown yachts axopar

    Jeff Brown Yachts San Diego - Main Office 2330 Shelter Island Drive Suite 105 San Diego CA, U.S. 92106 (619) 222-9899 (619) 709-0697 https://jeffbrownyachts.com... Axopar 45 Range Axopar 45 XC Cross Cabin Axopar 37 Range Axopar 37 XC Cross Cabin Axopar 37 Sun-Top Axopar 37 Spyder Axopar 28 Range ...

  21. Motor yacht Silver Fox

    Silver Fox is a 47.6 m / 156′3″ luxury motor yacht. She was built by Baglietto in 2018. With a beam of 9.5 m and a draft of 2.5 m, she has a steel hull and aluminium superstructure. This adds up to a gross tonnage of 493 tons. She is powered by Caterpillar engines of 2250 hp each giving her a maximum speed of 16 knots and a cruising speed of 12 knots. Silver Fox's maximum range is ...

  22. Elektrostal

    Elektrostal , lit: Electric and Сталь , lit: Steel) is a city in Moscow Oblast, Russia, located 58 kilometers east of Moscow. Population: 155,196 ; 146,294 ...

  23. Lurssen delivers 136m superyacht Flying Fox for serial owner

    The previous yacht to cruise under the name Flying Fox was a 74-meter Nobiskrug delivered in 2010 with a similar colour scheme to that of the 136-meter. Listed on the market in 2017 by Imperial Yachts, the same company that handled the build of the 136-meter, that yacht was sold in November 2017 and is now known as Dytan .