Motor Car History

Rolls-Royce 40/50 Silver Ghost

The Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost refers both to a car model and to one specific car from that series.

Originally named the "40/50 h.p." the chassis was first made at Royce's Manchester works, with production moving to Derby in July 1908, and also, between 1921 and 1926, in Springfield, Massachusetts. Chassis no. 60551, registered AX 201 , was the car that was originally given the name "Silver Ghost." Other 40/50 hp cars were also given names, but the Silver Ghost title was taken up by the press, and soon all 40/50s were called by the name, a fact not officially recognised by Rolls-Royce until 1925, when the Phantom range was launched.The Original Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost one of the first of the 40/50 h.p.series designed and built by Henry Royce in 1906. The first managing director of the company, Claude Johnson, had this special aluminium painted touring body built for it and its external metalwork silver-plated and gave it the name " Silver Ghost." The car had a six-cylinder engine composed of two blocks of three cylinders with bore and stroke being 4 11/2 inches. The compression ratio was 3.2 to 1. Like future Rolls-Royce cars the degree of silence was achieved by having a special expansion chamber for each cylinder leading into the main silencer. The brakes were drum type on the rear wheels, and the car had four forward speeds. Prop. shaft drive, overhead inlet and side exhaust valves completed the picture. The marque stayed in production for many years.Its quiet, smooth-running became very welcome to motorists after the bone-jarring caused by previous cars. Both open and closed bodies of various designs were fitted, to suit the requirements of the customer. 'The Silver Ghost' became the standard by which to judge other cars and it is still, to this day.

Rolls-Royce 40/50 Silver Ghost touring

Rolls-Royce 40/50 (Silver Ghost) touring

The Silver Ghost was the origin of Rolls-Royce's claim of making the "Best car in the world" – a phrase coined not by themselves, but by the prestigious publication Autocar in 1907.

The chassis and engine were also used as the basis of a range of Rolls-Royce Armoured Cars.

In 1906, Rolls-Royce produced four chassis to be shown at the Olympia car show, two existing models, a four-cylinder 20 hp and a six-cylinder 30 hp, and two examples of a new car designated the 40/50 hp. The 40/50 hp was so new that the show cars were not fully finished, and examples were not provided to the press for testing until March 1907.

Rolls-Royce 40/50 landaulet 1906

Rolls-Royce 40/50 landaulet 1906

The car at first had a new side-valve, six-cylinder, 7036 cc engine (7428 cc from 1910) with the cylinders cast in two units of three cylinders each as opposed to the triple two-cylinder units on the earlier six. A three-speed transmission was fitted at first with four-speed units used from 1913. The seven-bearing crankshaft had full pressure lubrication, and the centre main bearing was made especially large to remove vibration, essentially splitting the engine into two three-cylinder units. Two spark plugs were fitted to each cylinder with, from 1921, a choice of magneto or coil ignition. The earliest cars had used a trembler coil to produce the spark with a magneto as an optional extra which soon became standard - the instruction was to start the engine on the trembler/battery and then switch to magneto. Continuous development allowed power output to be increased from 48 bhp (36 kW) at 1,250 rpm to 80 bhp (60 kW) at 2,250 rpm. Electric lighting became an option in 1914 and was standardised in 1919. Electric starting was fitted from 1919 along with electric lights to replace the older ones that used acetylene or oil.

Rolls-Royce 40/50 limosine 1906

Rolls-Royce 40/50 limosine 1906

Development of the Silver Ghost was suspended during World War I, although the chassis and engine were supplied for use in Rolls-Royce Armoured Cars.

Rolls-Royce 40/50 Pullman Deluxe 1906

Rolls-Royce 40/50 Pullman Deluxe 1906

The chassis had rigid front and rear axles and leaf springs all round. Early cars only had brakes on the rear wheels operated by a hand lever, with a pedal-operated transmission brake acting on the propeller shaft. The footbrake system moved to drums on the rear axle in 1913. Four-wheel servo-assisted brakes became optional in 1923.

Rolls-Royce 40/50 chassis 1906

Rolls-Royce 40/50 chassis 1906

Despite these improvements the performance of the Silver Ghost's competitors had improved to the extent that its previous superiority had been eroded by the early 1920s. Sales declined from 742 in 1913 to 430 in 1922. The company decided to launch its replacement which was introduced in 1925 as the New Phantom. After this, older 40/50 models were called Silver Ghosts to avoid confusion.

A total of 7874 Silver Ghost cars were produced from 1907 to 1926, including 1701 from the American Springfield factory. Many of them still run today. A fine example is on display at the National Motor Museum, Beaulieu.

The Alpine Eagles

A 40/50 was privately entered in the prestigious 1912 Austrian Alpine Trial by James Radley, but its 3-speed gearbox proved inadequate for the ascent of the Katschberg Pass. A factory team of four cars were prepared for the 1913 event with four-speed gearboxes, and engine power increased from 60 to 75 bhp (56 kW) by an increase in compression ratio and larger carburettor. The team gained six awards including the Archduke Leopold Cup. Replicas of the victorious cars were put into production and sold officially as Continental models, but they were called Alpine Eagles by chief test driver (and later Rolls-Royce Managing Director) Ernest Hives, and this is the name that they have kept.

Alpine Eagle Silver Ghost

James Radley Alpine Eagle' Silver Ghost

The Silver Ghost

In 1907. Claude Johnson, Commercial and Managing Director of Rolls-Royce, ordered a car to be used as a demonstrator by the company. With chassis no. 60551 and registered AX 201, it was the 12th 40/50 hp to be made, and was painted in aluminium paint with silver-plated fittings. The car was named the "Silver Ghost" to emphasise its ghost-like quietness, and a plaque bearing this name adorned the bulkhead. An open-top Roi-des-Belges body by coachbuilder Barker was fitted, and the car readied for the Scottish reliability trials of 1907 and, immediately afterwards, another 15,000-mile (24,000 km) test which included driving between London and Glasgow 27 times.

The aim was to raise public awareness of the new company and to show the reliability and quietness of their new car. This was a risky idea: cars of this time were notoriously unreliable, and roads of the day could be horrendous. Nevertheless, the car set off on trials, and with press aboard, broke record upon record. Even after 7,000 miles (11,000 km), the cost to service the car was a negligible £2 2s 7d (£2.13). The reputation of the 40/50, and Rolls-Royce, was established.

AX201 was sold in 1908 to a private customer who used it for his annual vacation to Italy and recovered by the company in 1948. Since then, it has been used as a publicity car and travelled worldwide. In 1989, the car was restored by SC Gordon Coachbuilders Luton, and P&A Wood, London, UK. It is now owned by Bentley Motors.

In 1984, the car was photographed in great detail whilst in storage in Luton by precision model makers Franklin Mint. This die-cast model went on to become one of their best-selling products.

The Silver Ghost is considered the most valuable car in the world; in 2005 its insured value was placed at US$35 million. Today it is valued at US$200 million

rolls-royce. 60551 AX 201,

Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost Technical details and specifications (1906-1926)

ENGINE: Bore: 1 14.5 mm. Stroke: 120.7 mm. Swept Volume: 7,434 c.c. 7.036 cc (original) Cylinders: 6 in line. Cast in two blocks of three. Carburettors 1 Rolls. Side valve Ignition Trembler coil and magneto

SUSPENSION: (front) Semi-elliptic (rear) Platform rear spring suspension

CHASSIS: Unconventional Radiator and Engine mounting within the chassis

BRAKES: Footbrake, external contracting type on prop-shaft. Hand-brake, internal in brake drums Transmission and rear wheels only until 1923 when four wheel brakes were fitted.

PERFORMACE: Max. B.H.P. 48 (rated) Top speed 60 m.p. h.

TRANSMISSION: Clutch Cone type Gearbox 4 speed and reverse top o'drive overdrive top gear giving overall ratios of Top 2.7, 3rd 4.2, 2nd 5.9 and 1st 8.5 to l. Fina/ Drive Spiral bevel

DIMENSIONS AND WEIGHT: Length 180 ins Width 72 ins Wheelbase 135 ins Height Various Weight Chassis only 18 1/2 cwt Tank capacity 13 galls

WHEELS TYRES: Tyre size 895 X 150

ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT: 12 volt.

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Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost (1906 to 1926)

The Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost, also known as the 40/50HP, was a series of luxury cars introduced in 1906. This series of cars were first known as the 40/50HP, with one example being named the Silver Ghost. The name caught on, and soon all 40/50HP cars were known as Silver Ghosts. The Silver Ghost was powered by a 7.0L or 7.5L inline six, and was in production until 1926.

Q: What is the top sale price of a Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost?

A: The top sale price was $2,535,000 for a 1910 Rolls-Royce 40/50 HP Silver Ghost Pullman Limousine on August 14 2021.

Q: What is the lowest sale price of a Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost?

A: The lowest recorded sale price was $89,600 for a 1922 Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost Sedan by Rolls-Royce Custom Coach Work on March 07 2020.

Q: What is the average sale price of a Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost?

A: The average price of a Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost is $623,295.

Q: When was the Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost produced?

A: The Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost was sold for model years 1906 to 1926.

Model years for Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost (1906 to 1926)

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1906 Rolls-Royce 40/50 Silver Ghost: The birth of a legend

One of the most remarkable vehicles of the British manufacturer – Rolls-Royce 40/50 Silver Ghost, was the epitome of luxury and style, forever staying in the history of the automotive industry.

silver ghost 1906

Source: Secret Classics

The history of the automotive industry has long exceeded 100 years. During this rather significant period for science and technology, the industry went through several eras, and approaches to vehicle construction have repeatedly changed and taken on new forms. But in automobile history, as in any other branch of human activity, there were milestones forever stuck in the memory of people. Such was the legendary 40/50 hp or the inimitable Silver Ghost. 

It all started with the first Rolls-Royce 10 hp model, the prototype of which appeared in 1903 when engineer Henry Royce from Manchester bought the French car Decauville 1903. He was so dissatisfied with its design and the technical specifications that built and sold the first car of his design to Charles Stewart Rolls. The wealthy gentleman liked it so much that by the end of 1904 a cooperation agreement was signed. The joined company was named Rolls-Royce producing luxurious vehicles for more than a century. Since then, the brand always strived to produce only “the best cars in the world” and succeeded!

The origins

silver ghost 1906

Source: Autoreview

The twelfth chassis (#60551) of the six-cylinder 40/50 hp model debuted in 1906 and was built for the company’s Managing Director Claude Johnson. It was he who persuaded the company’s board to focus on a single high-end model, which soon earned the emotional title of “the best car in the world.” Johnson ordered the body from the London studio Barker & Co.:; the automobile was painted silver, and the fittings were covered with a layer of natural silver. Therefore, and also thanks to the silent operation of the new motor, the owner gave the vehicle, like a yacht, its name – “Silver Ghost”, which was stated on the plate on the body. Shortly after delivering the automobile, Claude Johnson entered it in the Scottish Reliability Trial and won the Dewar Cup. The car set the official record by driving 14 932 miles (24 030.73 km) without a single forced stop due to a malfunction. The result was widely publicized, and the semi-official nickname Silver Ghost stuck to the 40/50 HP model – although only Claude Johnson’s vehicle with the license plate AX201 carried such a name.

The first Ghost

silver ghost 1906

Source: Magneto magazine

Interestingly, the British brand’s first models did not become a breakthrough in the field of auto construction. But the real success was achieved in 1906 when the 40/50 hp model was released. The first indicator 40 hp meant the “tax power” of the engine, calculated from the diameter of the cylinders and their number, and the second characterized the real power of the power unit. By the way, the new engine had six cylinders and a working volume of more than 7 liters, which, in conjunction with a power of 50 hp was a very impressive result, considering that this engineering solution was created more than 100 years ago. The technical platform also had a new crankshaft mounting system on seven bearings. This solution allowed to evenly distribute the weight of the engine and significantly reduce the noise emitted by it. The ignition problem was solved by installing two glow plugs on each of the six cylinders. The new model was introduced at the London Motor Show when the company’s engineers assembled a one-of-a-kind copy on chassis 60544. The legendary vehicle with a unique body received its epoch-making name – “Silver Ghost”. The vehicle, in addition to the attention-grabbing silver body, received surprisingly strong details. The test run of the car was over 24 000 kilometers, while the only malfunction was a broken fuel cock. However, thanks to the quality and high strength, Rolls-Royce automobiles have repeatedly received extremely positive reviews and recognition from the automotive community. According to unofficial statistics, 6 out of 10 Rolls-Royces ever produced are still on the move, and company representatives like to repeat that a Rolls-Royce cannot break, it simply stops functioning.

Did you know?

silver ghost 1906

Source: Diecast Society

The Silver Ghost became legendary for its outstanding ride, reliability, and build quality. The first English armored vehicle, which participated in the First World War, was built on its chassis, and a significant part of the combat aircraft of that time was equipped with Rolls-Royce aircraft engines, the production of which was mastered in 1914.

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1907-1926 Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost

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Rolls Royce Silver Ghost

Henry Royce probably did not start out to create the "Best Car in the World" when he designed the Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost. What he wanted was to replace his rough-running six-cylinder "Thirty" with something more reliable, something smoother and quieter.

He succeeded so completely that the new car, introduced at the Olympia Motor Show and later named Silver Ghost, became the longest-running single model next to the Model T Ford (and, much later, the VW Beetle and the British Mini) -- and certainly the most famous luxury car in history. The Silver Ghost remains to this day the most desirable model among antique (pre-1930) cars.

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Rolls-Royce, founded in Manchester in 1904, was the amalgam of socialite entrepreneur Charles S. Rolls, who'd been selling Panhards and wanted something better, and the aforementioned Mr. Royce, whose previous experience had been with electric cranes.

Early production involved a variety of cars in different sizes with two, three, four, and six cylinders, about as successful as bystanders expected from this unlikely duo. But those who thought the venture would fail did not reckon on Royce's acumen, nor his single-minded determination to build a better car than anybody else.

The Silver Ghost was renowned for its smooth, quiet running, achieved with a massive, seven-main-bearing crankshaft and stiff crankcase. Its cylinders were cast in two blocks of three, inclusive of heads, which eliminated head gaskets and the chances of their blowing. The specifications included full-pressure lubrication, an electrical system that really worked, and a precision carburetor made with the quality of a Swiss watch. Its reliability, at a time when "horseless carriages" were anything but reliable, was legendary.

This was proven when a Silver Ghost emerged from a 15,000-mile trial in 1907, observed by the Royal Automobile Club, with highest marks. Four years later, on the London-Edinburgh-London run, a Ghost ran the entire distance in top gear with a fuel consumption of 24.32 miles per Imperial gallon (19 mpg U.S.), an astonishing performance for the time in such a heavy car.

Although the seven-liter side-valve engine's compression ratio was only 3,2:1, it developed 48 brake horsepower at 1,500 rpm, and would deliver 50-mph cruising speeds, which was more than an enthusiastic driver could do on almost any public road of the day.

When a Ghost owner wanted to really let it out, he'd pay a visit to Brooklands, the huge banked oval in Surrey, built just after the first Ghosts. Brooklands' motto was "the right crowd and no crowding," which was certainly appropriate here: the Silver Ghost chassis alone cost £985, close to $5,000 at the time, five or 10 times what the average professional could expect to make in a year. Truly this was a car for the classes and not the masses.

Henry Royce's success came at a key time, when the cash-poor company desperately needed a winner. So well received was it that the firm moved to more spacious quarters in Derby in 1908, simultaneously deciding to produce only this model -- and so it did for the next 17 years.

On the next page, learn about the 1909 to the 1919 Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost.

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1909-1926 Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost

The first mechanical change to the Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost came in 1909, when an increase in stroke brought displacement to 7.4 liters and the original four-speed transmission was replaced by a three-speed unit. By 1911, when Rolls-Royce prepared a car for the London-Edinburgh run, compression was 3.5:1 and carburetion increases had brought horsepower to 58. The Ghost reverted to a four-speed transmission in 1913, when cantilever rear suspension was adopted.

That was the year when Rolls-Royce was able to claim an honest 80 mph for the light, open-bodied Ghosts built for the Austrian Alpine Trials, where they finished ahead of all other rivals. Incidentally, the beautiful London-Edinburgh tourer survives, and recently changed hands at a Florida auction for $1,3000,000 -- a bargain compared to two other, less distinguished examples which sold for $2,005,000 and $2,600,000.

Limited production continued during the Great War, when many new and some old Ghosts were fitted with armored bodywork for running battles against the Turks in the Middle East, under such commanders as Allenby and Lawrence of Arabia. Others were used as staff cars and ambulances. Inflation saw the chassis price rise to £2,100 ($10,165) after the war, although this now included a chain-driven self-starter and four-wheel brakes with a servo assist. Brake horsepower of the 1919 and later models rose to 70.

In 1920, Rolls-Royce of America, Incorporated, was founded at Springfield, Massachusetts, in a plant purchased from the American Wire Wheel Company. The object was to build cars for the American market while avoiding high import tariffs, and the subsidiary enjoyed good success until the Depression closed it down in 1931. Silver Ghosts were built at Springfield beginning in 1921.

Retaining their English right-hand drive, they offered the 7.4-liter engine rated at 80 bhp. In 1925, Springfield finally switched to left-hand drive, by which time the cars were developing 85 bhp at 2,300 rpm and could do 70-plus mph with the high-speed (3.25:1) rear axle ratio. Two huge wheelbases, of 144 and 150 1/2inches, were available, and bodies were supplied by the cream of American coach builders, chiefly Brewster. Of the 2,944 Springfield Rolls-Royces built over 11 years, 1,703 were Silver Ghosts.

Paul Woudenberg, in his Illustrated Rolls-Royce and Bentley Buyer's Guide (1984), writes that the American Rolls had "no glaring weaknesses and, given regular maintenance and lubrication, has nearly unlimited life. The American Ghost has been given much attention in the Flying Lady, publication of the Rolls-Royce Owners Club, especially in the years after 1952, and owners will find back issues of this magazine (still available) a valuable guide in maintenance and troubleshooting."

He adds that while the domestic version lacked the four-wheel brakes of the later British cars, it did feature valve covers, an important improvement over the exposed valves of the English models. The domestics can be recognized at a glance by their drum headlamps, tubular bumpers, and American componentry such as electrics, as well as left-hand drive after 1925.

Finally, since Brewster built the vast majority of American bodies (and was itself bought by Rolls-Royce of America in 1923), the Springfield cars carry a far more uniform line of bodywork.

The Silver Ghost was superseded in Britain by the Phantom I in 1925, after a long and distinguished career. UK production since 1906 amounted to 6,173 chassis, making 7,876 altogether.

On our final page, you will find the specifications for the 1907-1926 Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost.

1907-1926 Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost Specifications

The 1907-1926 Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost was hailed by some as the "Best Car in the World." Though some might dispute this title, there is no question that the Silver Ghost was a truly classic car. On this page, you will find the specifications for the 1907-1926 Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost.

Engine: I-6, cast in 2 blocks, integral beads, side valves, 7,036 cc (4 1/2 × 4 1/2-in bore × stroke), 7 main bearings, dual ignition with magneto and trembler coil, 3.2:1 compression ratio, 48 bhp @ 1,500 rpm

Transmission: 4-speed, cone clutch multi-dry-plate clutch

Suspension, front: Semi-elliptic leaf springs

Suspension, rear: Semi-elliptic leaf springs with auxiliary transverse leaf spring

Brakes: External contracting on the driveshaft

Wheelbase (in.): 135-1/2 and 143-1/2

Weight (lbs): 2,050-2,200 (chassis only)

Top speed (mph) : 60

Production: UK 6,173 US 1,703 (1907-26)

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The Rolls-Royce That Built a Reputation

By Robert C. Yeager

  • Aug. 17, 2012

ON its way to the Pebble Beach Concours d’Élégance as a participant in the 1,500-mile Motoring Classic tour, the 1912 Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost owned by Charles Howard of Gloucestershire, England, was sidelined by an engine failure. That will not affect the Silver Ghost’s place in history, however. Some experts consider the Ghost the greatest Rolls of all.

T. E. Lawrence wrote, “A Rolls in the desert was above rubies,” and regarded his nine Silver Ghosts as indispensable to military success.

The British Army officer, known as Lawrence of Arabia, told the broadcaster Lowell Thomas after World War I that his fondest wish was for “my own Rolls-Royce car with enough tires and petrol to last all my life.”

First offered in 1906, the Silver Ghost proved virtually indestructible and, as its wealthy patrons demanded, infinitely adaptable. Partly because the chassis were so long-lived, the same car was often rebodied several times.

silver ghost 1906

“Just as each season you needed a Savile Row tailor for a new suit,” said Peter Hageman, a Silver Ghost owner, Pebble Beach judge and frequent participant in the motoring classic tour, “you needed a coachbuilder for a new body.”

Mr. Howard, a longtime collector, maintains that a car should be measured by its handling and its “poke.” The Ghost offered both. It could motor smoothly at 55 miles an hour with its engine turning a mere 1,500 r.p.m.

Often, said Laurence Anderson, a mechanic in Berkeley, Calif., who specializes in vintage Rolls-Royces and Bentleys, Silver Ghosts were equipped with steel-studded tires to better deal with London cobblestones made slick by rain, mud and horse manure. The cars’ wooden running boards were strong enough to be removed and driven over if needed to cross a stream, he said.

Fitted with Vickers machine guns and armor plate during World War I, the cars served in combat and as ambulances. Armored Ghosts were still in service at the time of the North Africa campaigns of World War II. As for Mr. Howard’s car, by 1943, according to a dashboard plaque, it had logged 750,000 miles.

When production ended in 1926, nearly 8,000 Ghosts had been built.

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Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost

American silver ghost (1921-1926).

Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost

Silver Ghost (1907-1925)

Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost

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Related articles and history.

A Detailed Look Back At The Rolls Royce Silver Ghost

This quiet running beauty was the dream car of its day and remains a vintage dream car today.

The well known automotive classic Rolls Royce Silver Ghost has made a name for itself and the Rolls Royce company since its launch in 1906 at the Olympia Motor Show under its original name “40/50”. The Roll Royce Silver Ghost passed various durability tests  before its regular production began, which set the standard for all future Rolls Royces. The silver Ghost proved the companies claim to make “The Best Car In The World,” which is why the Rolls Royce is one of the most recognized trademarks in history.

Only two years after the partnership between Henery Royce (The Mechanic) and Charles Stewart Rolls (The Promotor), this masterpiece was created and brought lifelong recognition to their names. This article will take a detailed look back at the Silver Ghost, the car that made Rolls Royce who they are today.

Related: Bring A Trailer: 1935 Rolls-Royce Phantom II Tourer

The Early Years

When designing the Rolls Royce Silver Ghost, Henry Royce had an objective to create a quiet, reliable, smooth-running automobile, and he was none other than successful. Though this car’s production was initially at Royce’s Manchester works in 1906, production locations changed through the years. The Derby Factory was its production home in 1908 and Springfield, MA USA, between 1921 and 1926.

This car’s original name, “40/50,” took the backseat when the quietness of this car reminded people of something “ghost-like.” It wasn’t until shortly after the press took this ghost description and ran with it. This car’s beautiful and unique appearance was surrounded with silver plated fittings and painted in aluminum paint, ultimately completing its name and description ⸺ The Silver Ghost. The popular name was eventually attached to the entire series, though the original Silver Ghost will always be Chassis no. 60551.

Many people during the early 1900s enjoyed hiring chauffeurs to handle and drive their automobiles. However, the Rolls Royce Silver Ghost's design had a certain appeal that made many owners want to get behind the wheel themselves and take it for a spin.

Related: 10 Most Amazing Rolls Royce Models Ever Made, Ranked

Lets Talk Design

The Silver Ghost broke the world’s record for distance and reliability, operating without any involuntary stops for 14,371 miles. The bodywork on this four-door automobile provided its owners with a durable yet luxurious car ; this took driving to a whole new level. Many vehicle engines were noisy due to the long crankshaft design most manufacturers implemented during this time.

Rolls Royce engines fixed this problem with their full pressure oiling system and large bearings enclosed in an aluminum alloy crankcase, alleviating the commonly heard noise when driving. This Rolls Royces is equipped with a side-valve six-cylinder engine and 4-speed gearbox , reaching a maximum of 60 MPH.

It’s 48 brake horsepower(bhp) at 1,500 RPM provided the driver with more bhp than any other automobile of the time. In addition to its smooth, vibration-free ride, the quality of mechanics made this car the first of its kind to withstand decades of operation.

Final Look At The Rolls Royce Silver Ghost

Rolls Royce has made its mark in history for what it takes to make a uniquely innovative and exceptional automobile. The company continues to trailblaze into the future with its unparalleled luxury and fine craftsmanship .

The 1906 Silver Ghost design was ahead of its time, and many people looked at this car as “the best car in the world.” Between the years 1906 to 1926, there were 7874 Silver Ghost cars produced. Many of these beautiful cars are well preserved and fully functional, so the people of today can continuously marvel at such intriguing automotive history.

Next: 1970 Rolls-Royce Owned By Muhammad Ali Goes Up For Auction 

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Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost (1906 - 1926)

4 rolls-royce silver ghost (1906 - 1926) for sale.

silver ghost 1906

Rolls-Royce models

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  • Silver Cloud III (1962 - 1966)
  • Silver Dawn (1949 - 1955)
  • Silver Dawn (1994 - 1998)
  • Silver Ghost (1906 - 1926)
  • Silver Seraph (1998 - 2002)
  • Silver Shadow I (1965 - 1977)
  • Silver Shadow II (1977 - 1980)
  • Silver Spirit (1980 - 1989)
  • Silver Spirit II (1989 - 1993)
  • Silver Spirit III (1993 - 1994)
  • Silver Spur (1980 - 1989)
  • Silver Spur (1994 - 1998)
  • Silver Spur II (1989 - 1993)
  • Silver Wraith (1946 - 1959)
  • Silver Wraith II (1977 - 1980)
  • Wraith (1938 - 1939)
  • Wraith (1946 - 1959)
  • Wraith (2013 - )

What's Hot

Rolls royce silver ghost sells for $7.1 million, making it the most expensive rolls royce sold at auction (photos).

Associate Editor, HuffPost Small Business

silver ghost 1906

Car enthusiasts at the Bonhams Goodwood Festival of Speed witnessed a record-breaking auction when a classic Rolls Royce sold for 5.8 million euros ($7.1 million) to an anonymous bidder on June 29, making it the most expensive Rolls Royce ever sold at an auction.

First manufactured in 1906, the 40/50hp Silver Ghost model is known as " The Corgi ," named after a line of toys modelled after the car, according to the Daily Mail . The opulent Double Pullman limousine was first purchased in 1912 by John M. Stephens for about 1,200 euros according to Bonhams. While the luxury car was intended for personal use, many of the models were converted into ambulances during World War One, the Telegraph reported.

The car, which is capable of running at 60 miles per hour gets 15 miles to the gallon. Its headlights, carriage lights, rear lights and inflatable tires are still intact.

The car was sold following the death of its American owner John O'Quinn. A Bonhams representative described the auction as "pure theater" as two revelers bid in over 125,000 euro increments before the hammer dropped at 5.8 million euros, well above the 2.5 million euro expected sale price, according to the Telegraph .

This won't be the last big-ticket item up for bid at Bonhams. The auction house will auction off a classic Mercedes Benz in September, which is expected to fetch over $2 million.

Check out some photos of the Rolls Royce:

"The Corgi" 1912 Rolls-Royce 40/50hp Double Pullman Limousine Coachwork

"The Corgi" 1912 Rolls-Royce

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silver ghost 1906

The Red Square and beyond: a guide to Moscow’s neighbourhoods

Apr 23, 2019 • 6 min read

The Red Square, Kremlin and St Basil's Cathedral in Moscow at night © Mordolff / Getty Images

The Red Square, Kremlin and St Basil's Cathedral in Moscow at night © Mordolff / Getty Images

One of the world’s largest cities, Moscow is a true metropolis whose ancient neighbourhoods are interspersed with newly built high-rises, inhabited by people from all over the former Soviet Union.

It’s also the city of rings: the innermost is the Kremlin itself; further away are the former defensive rings, Boulevard Ring and Garden Ring; still further are the Third Ring Road and the MKAD, which delineates the city’s borders. There’s an ongoing joke that Moscow Mayor is the Lord of the Rings. Most sights are contained within the Garden Ring, although for some more authentic neighbourhoods one has to venture further out. To help you explore Moscow’s diversity, we picked our favourite ’hoods – but this list is by no means exhaustive.

Evening view of Moscow's Red Square from the Kremlin towards St Basil's Cathedral

The Red Square and around

It can be argued that Moscow, or even the whole of Russia, starts at the  Red Square  – it’s an absolute must-see for any visitor. After standing in line to check out Lenin’s granite  mausoleum , go to GUM , Moscow's oldest department store. Full of luxury shops, it’s famous for the glass roof designed by one of Russia’s most celebrated architects, Vladimir Shukhov. Apart from architectural wonders, GUM has several places to eat including the Soviet-style cafeteria Stolovaya No 57 where you can sample mysterious-sounding delicacies such as the ‘herring in a fur coat’.

On the opposite side of GUM, Kremlin ’s walls and towers rise above the Red Square. Walk through the Alexander Garden  and past the grotto to the Kremlin’s entrance. It’s a treasure trove for any art and history lover: ancient gold-domed churches, icons galore and the resting place of Moscow tsars.

On the other side of the Red Square is Moscow's symbol,  St Basil's Cathedral with its multi-colored domes. Right behind it is the newly built Zaryadye Park , which showcases flora from all over Russia; another attraction is the floating bridge jutting out above the embankment and the Moscow river. A glass pavilion nearby hosts Voskhod , a space-themed restaurant with dishes from all 15 former Soviet Union republics. It’s a perfect spot for a classy evening meal and there’s often live music.

People chilling out at a pond in central Moscow on a summer day

Patriarch’s Ponds

The Patriarch’s Ponds (aka Patriki) is a historical neighbourhood, celebrated in Mikhail Bulgakov’s novel Master and Margarita . Located right off Tverskaya street, Moscow’s main thoroughfare, Patriki recently became the city’s most happening quarter. It has some of the most elegant architecture, including several buildings by art-nouveau genius Fyodor Shekhtel. Narrow streets here have a cozy feel, with recently widened sidewalks and bike lanes. In the summer it becomes party central.

Start by checking out free exhibitions or one of the cutting-edge performances at the experimental theatre Praktika . But make no mistake, the neighbourhood’s main attraction are its bars and restaurants. Patriki’s residents are well-off Russians and expats, so it’s no wonder that  Moscow’s recent culinary revolution started here. Uilliam’s , one of the pioneers of this foodie movement, still rules over the scene with its floor-to-ceiling windows. Also try AQ Chicken  for everything chicken-related, Patara  for a taste of Georgian cuisine, and Cutfish for some great sushi. Finish your gastronomic tour with original cocktails at Pinch or the Moscow outpost of NYC restaurant Saxon+Parole .

Old red-brick buildings of the former Arma factory in Moscow

Around Kursky train station

For a long time, Kursky train station was surrounded by semi-abandoned factories and the area was best avoided. It all changed in the late 2000s, when a dilapidated wine factory was turned into Winzavod , a mecca for fans of contemporary art. Today these red-brick buildings are occupied by some of Moscow’s leading galleries. After taking in all the art, pop in the small wine bar Barrell  for a glass from burgeoning wineries of Russia’s south or grab a bite at Khitrye Lyudi  cafe.

Right next to Winzavod is Artplay , another refurbished factory full of design and furniture shops and large exhibition spaces.  It’s also home to  Pluton , one of the latest additions to Moscow’s dance scene. Other Pluton residents are the multimedia art gallery Proun  and another lunch option,  Shanhaika , with authentic Chinese cuisine.

A short walk away is Arma, where a cluster of circular gas holders has been turned into offices, restaurants and clubs including Gazgolder  (it belongs to one of Russia’s most famous rappers, Basta). Apart from hip-hop concerts, Gazgolder organises regular techno parties that sometimes go non-stop from Friday to Monday.

Colourful facade and onion-shaped domes of a Russian Orthodox church in Moscow

If you’re interested in religious architecture, Taganka is the place to go. First of all, see the old Moscow at Krutitskoye Podvorye – one of those places where nothing seems to have changed in centuries. The monastery was founded in the 13th century, but in the 16th century it became the home of Moscow metropolitans and most of the surviving buildings are from that epoch. Take a tour of the grounds, and don’t miss the interior and icons of the Assumption Cathedral.

Your next stop is the Rogozhskoe settlement of ‘old believers’, a branch that split from Russian Orthodoxy in the 17th century. The settlement is dominated by an 80m-tall bell tower. The yellow-coloured Intercession Church, built in neoclassical style with baroque elements, has an important collection of icons. Next to the church grounds is the popular Trapeznaya cafeteria, with Russian food cooked using traditional recipes – a perfect spot for lunch.

A short ride away is Andronikov Monastery, which today houses the Rublyov Museum  in the old monks’ quarters. There’s a great collection of ancient Orthodox icons although none by Andrei Rublyov, who was a monk here in the 15th century. The main attraction at the monastery is the small Saviour’s Cathedral, considered the oldest surviving church in Moscow.

Finish the day at the craft-beer cluster around Taganskaya metro station. Varka offers both Russian and imported labels, with the Burger Heroes stand serving arguably the best burgers in town. Craft & Draft looks more like a respectable old-fashioned pub, with decent food, 20 beers on tap and a hundred types of bottled brews.

Elaborate facade with statues and balcony on a mansion in Moscow

Khamovniki is Moscow’s ancient textile district, named after the word kham  (a type of cloth). Two main thoroughfares, Ostozhenka and Prechistenka, cut through the neighbourhood parallel to each other. The former turned into the so-called ‘Golden Mile’ of Moscow in the 1990s, with the highest real-estate prices and some of the best examples of new Russian architecture, while the latter is still mostly lined up with impressive 19th-century mansions.

Khamovniki is somewhat of a literary quarter, as several museums devoted to Russia’s best-known writers – among them  Leo Tolstoy , Alexander Pushkin  and Ivan Turgenev – popped up here during the last century. There’s also plenty to see for an art lover. The  Multimedia Art Museum regularly hosts exhibitions by some of the best photographers from all over the world, as well as contemporary art. Several galleries, including RuArts  and Kournikova Gallery , have also found home in Khamovniki.

When you’ve had your fill of literature and art, stop by Gorod Sad on Ostozhenka, an outpost of a local health-food chain, and order dishes such as pumpkin soup or grilled vegetables salads. Afterwards, head to Dom 12 , which is located just off Ostozhenka street. This restaurant and wine bar is frequented by the city’s intellectuals and its schedule includes lectures, book presentations and film screenings, while in the summer guests migrate to a lovely courtyard.

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Moscow public library, moscow carnegie library.

  • Location: Moscow Idaho Regional Essays: Idaho Latah County Architect: Watson Vernon Fred King Company Roy Moerder John Eisinger Hummel, Jones, Miller and Hunsucker Great Northern Construction Company Cobblestone Landscaping Types: Carnegie libraries (institutions) children's libraries (institutions) public libraries (buildings) libraries (buildings) arches semicircular arches fanlights Styles: Mission Style (Spanish Colonial Revival style) Materials: brick (clay material) sandstone roofing tile plate glass

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Anne L. Marshall, " Moscow Public Library ", [ Moscow , Idaho ], SAH Archipedia, eds. Gabrielle Esperdy and Karen Kingsley, Charlottesville: UVaP, 2012—, http://sah-archipedia.org/buildings/ID-01-057-0014 . Last accessed: January 23, 2024.

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silver ghost 1906

The Mission Revival Moscow Public Library is a testament to the passion and drive of two women’s groups who mobilized the community and secured Carnegie funding for library construction. While the initial Carnegie building symbolizes aspirations for education, culture, self-improvement, and community-building in the Progressive Era, the 1983 addition is the result of a decade of discussion and deliberation that affirmed the perseverance of library supporters and the established community’s commitment to honor its past while accommodating a growing and changing constituency.

This story began in 1885 with the establishment of a Women’s Reading Room Society in downtown Moscow. By 1904, members of two women’s groups, the Pleiades Club and the Ladies Historical Club, formed a library committee and began planning and raising funds for a new building. The committee’s secretary, Mary Forney, requested and received $10,000 in Carnegie Library Endowment Funds for library construction once the community procured a site and the city agreed to provide annual operating expenses. In 1905 Moscow citizens voted in favor of a permanent tax to support the library. A mayor-appointed library board and the two clubs raised funding to purchase a corner site two blocks from Main Street at the edge of the residential Fort Russell neighborhood.

In 1905 the board hired Boise architect Watson Vernon to design the library in the Mission Revival style, unusual for a library—especially in northern Idaho. Boise contractor Fred King Company began construction in the summer of 1905 and completed the building in the spring of 1906. Although the board planned to move into the new library at the beginning of April 1906, plans changed when the University of Idaho’s Administration Building burned to the ground on March 30th of that year. To accommodate the university, the library was used as classroom space until the end of the 1906–1907 academic year. University classes took place in the library until midafternoon each day, when the building opened for regular library use.

The library sits on a sloped site that enhances the drama of procession to the elevated entrance as seen by pedestrians walking uphill from downtown. The original Mission Revival building is symmetrical and rectangular in plan, with a rusticated sandstone raised basement supporting buff brick walls accented with sandstone lintels, stringcourse sills, and coping above. True to the Mission Revival style, the library has defined corner piers and decorative curvilinear parapets extending above a terra-cotta tile roof. The front of the central porch, to which visitors ascended by a pair of curved stone staircases, has its own decorative curvilinear parapet, perforated by a large semicircular arch. Inside, a circular librarian’s desk originally dominated the central space, which was a flanked by two reading rooms flooded by daylight through large rectangular windows capped with fanlights. The semi-cylindrical shape of the reading rooms eliminates hidden corners and allowed panoptical surveillance by a single librarian.

Over time, the building expanded to accommodate its growing and changing constituency. In 1931, the library board hired contractor Roy Moerder to prepare plans to double the stack and office space by removing the library’s back wall and extending the building to the east. Following Moerder’s plans and specifications, John Eisinger completed the addition by October 1931, extending the original north and south walls with buff bricks salvaged from the demolished east wall. In building the new east elevation, invisible from the street, Eisinger did not attempt to match the original building; instead he built it of red brick walls and rectangular windows. Other changes were the result of maintenance issues: in 1938 the deteriorating curved stairs of the entrance were replaced with a single, straight staircase.

The 1960s and 1970s were decades of change and activism for the library and its community. This began in relatively minor way with the 1964 remodeling of the basement from a clubroom into a children’s library. More significantly, in 1967, the Moscow Public Library merged with the Latah County Library to form the Moscow–Latah County Library District. The county library moved its collection into the Moscow Library, making it the headquarters for the entire district. By 1971 a citizens’ panel studied the library’s needs and urged administrative bodies to seek funding for a new facility. In 1972, the library board purchased two lots to the north of the library for $35,000. The following year the board hired a local firm, Architectural Workshop, to complete a building program and feasibility study that considered alternatives such as demolishing the existing building and rebuilding from the ground up, adding onto the original building, building on a site in a different location, or adapting the old post office for use as a library.

Next, the board then hired Coeur d’Alene architect R. G. Nelson to design a new 16,000-square-foot building. In 1977, Nelson presented a schematic design for a new building that some community members felt was inappropriately modern for a historic residential neighborhood. Public discussion of the feasibility study and schematic design drew many community members into a conversation about inadequate space, poor repair, and inaccessibility of the historic building. The conversation expanded to consider the library within the context of Moscow’s historic core. A citizen’s group, the Fort Russell Neighborhood Planning Association, advocated preserving the Carnegie library and requiring that any new building be “in harmony with the scale and character of the area.” Public appreciation of the historic Carnegie library led to its nomination to the National Register of Historic Places in 1978.

In 1977 and 1978 the board presented bond levy elections to voters of the Moscow and Latah County Library District to raise money for a new library building. Although the elections passed in Moscow, they failed in the county. By 1982, the library had hired another architecture firm, Hummel, Jones, Miller and Hunsucker. Project Architect Nelson Miller designed an addition that, while modern, was sympathetic to the historic building. His design was disseminated to the public in 1982, as the library board presented another bond levy to Moscow voters for $485,000 to renovate and add onto the existing library building; the bond passed. The Latah County District contributed savings, donations, and some annual funding for furnishings. Miller completed construction bid documents by July and the library board hired Great Northern Construction Company from Coeur d’Alene. Great Northern broke ground in August 1982 and the expanded library opened to the public in April 1983.

The 1983 addition preserves and complements the original building in both material and form. Buff brick walls of the addition match the original. A semicircular arch through the north wall echoes the semicircular arch of the original building’s entrance porch. Most importantly, the new library building steps back, literally, allowing the older building to take center stage. The newer building asserts its modern identity with large panes of south-facing glass that contrast in form with the round-arched windows of the original, yet they achieve the same end—to flood the reading area with daylight.

The library continues to serve as an active cultural and social node in the Moscow community. In 2013 City Council provided $25,000 to add to the $50,000 raised by the Library Friends to upgrade the library entrance. Jacob Osborne of Cobblestone Landscaping designed a new ADA-compliant entrance ramp and a pedestrian plaza to accommodate a variety of library programs. Completed in 2014, the new landscape design includes new seating, LED lighting, and water-wise and pollinator friendly landscaping.

Hibbard, Don, “Moscow Carnegie Library,” Lath County, Idaho. National Register of Historic Places Inventory-Nomination Form, 1979. National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior, Washington, DC.

Neil, J. Meredith. Saints and Oddfellows: A Bicentennial Sampler of Idaho Architecture . Boise, ID: Boise Gallery of Art Association, 1976.

Monroe, Julie R. Moscow: Living and Learning on the Palouse . Charleston, SC: Arcadia, 2003.

Moscow Library Collection (meeting minutes, correspondence, newspaper articles, and other papers and images related to design and construction of the Moscow Library). Latah County Historical Society, Moscow, ID.

Moscow-Latah County Library System Board. Board Reports 1965–1983. Moscow Public Library, Moscow, ID.

Otness, Lillian Woodworth. A Great Good Country: A Guide to Historical Moscow and Latah County, Idaho . Moscow, ID: Latah County Historical Society, 1983.

Spurling, Carol. Moscow Public Library: A Century of Service 1906-2006 . Moscow, ID: Moscow Public Library, 2006.

Writing Credits

  • Location: Moscow, Idaho Regional Overviews: Latah County Architect: Cobblestone Landscaping Types: Carnegie libraries (institutions) children's libraries (institutions) public libraries (buildings) libraries (buildings) arches semicircular arches fanlights Styles: Mission Style (Spanish Colonial Revival style) Materials: brick (clay material) sandstone roofing tile plate glass

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SAH Archipedia tells the story of the United States through its buildings, landscapes, and cities. This freely available resource empowers the public with authoritative knowledge that deepens their understanding and appreciation of the built environment. But the Society of Architectural Historians, which created SAH Archipedia with University of Virginia Press, needs your support to maintain the high-caliber research, writing, photography, cartography, editing, design, and programming that make SAH Archipedia a trusted online resource available to all who value the history of place, heritage tourism, and learning.

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  2. 1906 Rolls-Royce 40/50 Silver Ghost: The birth of a legend

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  3. 1906 Rolls-Royce 40/50 Silver Ghost: The birth of a legend

    silver ghost 1906

  4. Anniversary of 1906 Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost Stock Photo

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  5. Rolls Royce 40-50 Silver Ghost AX 201 de 1906

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COMMENTS

  1. Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost

    In 1906, Rolls-Royce produced four chassis to be shown at the Olympia car show, two existing models, a four-cylinder 20 hp and a six-cylinder 30 hp, and two examples of a new car designated the 40/50 hp. The 40/50 hp was so new that the show cars were not fully finished, and examples were not provided to the press for testing until March 1907. [3]

  2. The "Silver Ghost": The Car That Made Rolls-Royce

    The car that would become the Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost was introduced in December 1906 at the Olympia Show, as the 40/50. This was just two years after the partnership between "mechanic"...

  3. Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost (1906-1926)

    Rolls-Royce 40/50 limosine 1906 Development of the Silver Ghost was suspended during World War I, although the chassis and engine were supplied for use in Rolls-Royce Armoured Cars.

  4. Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost Market

    The Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost, also known as the 40/50HP, was a series of luxury cars introduced in 1906. This series of cars were first known as the 40/50HP, with one example being named the Silver Ghost. The name caught on, and soon all 40/50HP cars were known as Silver Ghosts.

  5. 1906 Rolls-Royce 40/50 Silver Ghost: The birth of a legend

    1906 Rolls-Royce 40/50 Silver Ghost: The birth of a legend One of the most remarkable vehicles of the British manufacturer - Rolls-Royce 40/50 Silver Ghost, was the epitome of luxury and style, forever staying in the history of the automotive industry. Source: Secret Classics The history of the automotive industry has long exceeded 100 years.

  6. Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost: Greatest car of the 1910s

    Today: the 1910s. The Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost was introduced in December 1906 at the Olympia Show as the 40/50 just two years after the partnership between "mechanic" Henry Royce and "promoter" Charles Steward Rolls began.

  7. 1907-1926 Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost

    The Silver Ghost was renowned for its smooth, quiet running, achieved with a massive, seven-main-bearing crankshaft and stiff crankcase. Its cylinders were cast in two blocks of three, inclusive of heads, which eliminated head gaskets and the chances of their blowing.

  8. Rolls-Royce Ghost

    The "Ghost" nameplate, named in honour of the Silver Ghost, a car first produced in 1906, was announced in April 2009 at the Auto Shanghai show. The production model was officially unveiled at the 2009 Frankfurt Motor Show. The Ghost Extended Wheelbase was introduced in 2011. During development, the Ghost was known as the "RR04".

  9. The Rolls-Royce That Built a Reputation

    First offered in 1906, the Silver Ghost proved virtually indestructible and, as its wealthy patrons demanded, infinitely adaptable. Partly because the chassis were so long-lived, the same car...

  10. The Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost Was One Of The Most Expensive ...

    The 1906 model included a 7.0L engine. The first Silver Ghost was referred to as the "40/50" due to its horsepower rating. The inline-six-cylinder engine was 453ci and had horsepower to weight ratio of about 88.85. At the time, the chassis alone was worth a staggering $11,750; In today's economy, this figure would be around $150,000.

  11. The Vintage Silver Ghost

    In 1906, Rolls-Royce introduced the model which would establish the company's world-wide reputation for engineering excellence. Known officially as the 40/50hp, the model became known more widely by the name of its most famous example: The Silver Ghost.

  12. History of The 1906 Rolls-royce Silver Ghost (Legendary)

    The Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost, an icon of automotive history, emerged in 1906 as a masterpiece of engineering and luxury.

  13. RollsRoyce Silver Ghost Model Information

    The Silver Ghost became available in 1906 and brought with it quality and technology to a level that had never been seen before on a motor vehicle. Most engines of the time had long and flexible crankshafts that were prone to vibration and noise. The Rolls-Royce engines had large bearings and pressurized oiling systems, secured by seven main ...

  14. A Detailed Look Back At The Rolls Royce Silver Ghost

    The well known automotive classic Rolls Royce Silver Ghost has made a name for itself and the Rolls Royce company since its launch in 1906 at the Olympia Motor Show under its original name "40/50". The Roll Royce Silver Ghost passed various durability tests before its regular production began, which set the standard for all future Rolls Royces.

  15. Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost

    In 1906, Rolls-Royce produced four chassis to be shown at the Olympia car show; after a great deal of public interest, the managing director, Mr. Claude Johnson (often described as the hyphen in "Rolls-Royce"), ordered the car painted silver, with silver-plated fittings. A plaque with the words "Silver Ghost" adorned the bulkhead.

  16. Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost (1906

    Looking for the Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost (1906 - 1926) of your dreams? There are currently 2 Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost (1906 - 1926) cars as well as thousands of other iconic classic and collectors cars for sale on Classic Driver.

  17. Rolls Royce Silver Ghost Sells For $7.1 Million, Making It The Most

    First manufactured in 1906, the 40/50hp Silver Ghost model is known as "The Corgi," named after a line of toys modelled after the car, according to the Daily Mail.The opulent Double Pullman limousine was first purchased in 1912 by John M. Stephens for about 1,200 euros according to Bonhams.

  18. Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost Classic Cars for Sale

    The Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost, also known as the Rolls-Royce 40/50, is a very highly regarded luxury car produced between 1906 and 1926. The name also refers to a unique vehicle, the original Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost, which is known as the world's most valuable vehicle. History of the Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost

  19. 1906 Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost: Prices, Reviews & Pictures

    1906 Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost Reviews, Pricing & Specs. Write a review. Reviews.

  20. Gorki Leninskiye

    Gorki Leninskiye (Russian: Го́рки Ле́нинские) is an urban locality (a work settlement) in Leninsky District of Moscow Oblast, Russia, located 10 kilometers (6.2 mi) south of Moscow city limits and the Moscow Ring Road.Its population is: 3,586 (2010 Census); 1,729 (2002 Census); 1,711 (1989 Census). The estate of Gorki belonged to various Muscovite noblemen from the 18th century.

  21. The Red Square and beyond: Moscow's neighbourhoods

    The Patriarch's Ponds (aka Patriki) is a historical neighbourhood, celebrated in Mikhail Bulgakov's novel Master and Margarita. Located right off Tverskaya street, Moscow's main thoroughfare, Patriki recently became the city's most happening quarter. It has some of the most elegant architecture, including several buildings by art ...

  22. Moscow Public Library

    In 1905 the board hired Boise architect Watson Vernon to design the library in the Mission Revival style, unusual for a library—especially in northern Idaho. Boise contractor Fred King Company began construction in the summer of 1905 and completed the building in the spring of 1906. Although the board planned to move into the new library at ...

  23. This day in history: Gorbachev's resignation 30 years ago ...

    On Dec. 8, the leaders of Russia, Ukraine and Belarus met in a hunting lodge, declaring the USSR dead and announcing the creation of the Commonwealth of Independent States. Two weeks later, eight ...