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43' sailboat

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  • Sailboat Reviews

Bob Perry designed this Saga for a specific purpose—fast, efficient cruising. Its beauty is in the sum of its parts: there's plenty of function, and form follows fairly enough.

43' sailboat

The term “performance cruiser” has become so overused by production builders as to have lost much of its meaning. We think the definition includes (but is not limited to) boats that can be sailed to their potential by two people, or even a singlehander. Cockpits should be large enough for comfortable lounging in warm climes, or under the moon. Each space belowdecks should be large enough for its intended use. And pricing should correspond to value.

The Robert Perry-designed Saga 43 seems to fit most of those definitions.

Company History Saga Yachts, Inc., of Ontario, Canada, was formed in 1995 by Allan Poole and three business partners. The firm commissioned Robert H. Perry to design the first Saga yacht, the 43-footer of which we speak, which began rolling off the production line in 1996. The company’s plan was to build performance cruisers suitable for bluewater sailing that are of higher quality than mainstream production builders.

Saga 43

A Scot, with an engineering degree from Strathclyde University in Glascow, Poole built race-winning performance sailing yachts for 10 years prior to emigrating to Canada. He held positions as general manager for CS Yachts, director of marketing for Tartan Yachts, and was president of Hinterholler Yachts. Immediately prior to forming Saga, he worked for C&C Yachts before it ceased operations.

The partnership at Saga, however, was not a happy one, and was terminated in 1998. Poole subsequently purchased the molds, and reorganized the company as Saga Marine. It now employs 35 people in a 20,000-square foot facility, and produces 12 to 15 boats annually. In addition to the 43-footer, the company manufacturers a Perry designed 35-footer. Perry is currently designing a 47-footer that the company plans to debut in 2002.

Dealers are located in Annapolis, Connecticut, Seattle, and California.

The Design Seattle architect Perry’s designs occupy a wide swath of the sailboat horizon. Three decades after its introduction, his Valiant 40 is still considered a well-mannered bluewater cruiser. Other designs include the Nordic 40 and the Esprit 37.

From the outset, the Saga 43 was “designed to be a legitimate fast cruiser that would combine elements from racing trends with a long waterline that increases speed and interior volume,” says Perry. “Most cruisers are designed inside out, but not here. We wanted to appeal to an owner who knows performance. Allan and I started with a big cockpit that would be comfortable and ease the task of managing the boat. We wanted a better balance between spaces on deck and below.”

The boat has a fine entry, with beam carried well forward. “She’s not narrow, says Perry, “though she’s six inches narrower than the Valiant 40. She’s just not fat. I think the marketplace is inundated with fat boats.”

There’s not much flare in the hull, but she provides a dry ride, as we learned on our test sail. There’s a bit of hollow at her bow, and she has a relatively low, 19″ high coachroof. Of her profile, Perry says, “I like a strong spring to the sheer.”

Her length-to-beam ratio is 3.94. Perry considers a narrow hull one with a ratio over 4.0, and anything under 3.2 fat.

“She’s complex forward but a normal design aft,” Perry says. At the opposite end of her fine entry, she presents a stout, stable section at the stern. “We wanted good tracking,” says Perry. “The hull form and rig combine to provide a neutral helm under most conditions.

“Most cruisers reef as a survival move, while racers reef to improve performance. You don’t have to wait until this boat is out of control to reef—she lets you know.”

Three keels are available, including a recently introduced shoal-draft version with a bulb and longer chord length to improve lift. The partially balanced spade rudder was placed as far aft as possible, allowing easier steering under a spinnaker in heavy seas.

Both of the oft-used ratios that measure performance potential indicate that she is a goer. The SA/D is 19.09 with a self-tacking jib, which places her on the high end of the “performance cruiser” scale, and a D/L of 152—lower than the typical production cruiser. Her polar plots indicate she’ll be fastest sailing between 120 and 135 degrees, when speed will reach 10 knots in 20 knots of wind. On paper she should sail to weather in the same wind at 7-plus knots.

Deck Layout Perhaps the most noteworthy characteristic of the rig and deck layout is that they were conceived with an eye to simplified shorthanded sailing at speed in the ocean. She carries a masthead rig with double headstays, like many round-the- world racers. Both headsails are flown from Harken furlers. The jib headstay is tacked at the stem. The stay for overlapping headsails is 2.6 feet forward at the end of the stainless steel bowsprit.

The inner jib is self-tacking, secured to a Harken traveler on the cabintop forward. The idea is that this jib will do for windward work, while off the wind the high-clewed outer jib will be unrolled and the inner jib furled. This set-up is somewhat ostentatiously called a Variable Geometry Rig™. The only real criticism we have of the system is that the short distance between stays requires manhandling the outer jib through the slot in a tack or a jibe (they do happen) and will produce excessive wear on the sail and the foredeck crew in any amount of air. It will be less of a problem for offshore sailors, who sometimes don’t change course for days.

The keel-stepped Offshore mast is supported by 1×19 wire. Shrouds are continuous. There are two sets of spreaders, swept slightly aft. The solid Forespar vang carries a 16:1 block and tackle.

What the casual observer would consider minor touches attest to her intended use: Decks are 19″ wide and chainplates are at the base of the cabin, so movement is unimpeded. Lifelines are 30″ tall—our preference for blue-water boats and 4-6″ higher than those of many competitors. On the port side of the mast is a compartment, flush to the deck, for storage of halyard tails and winch handles. Safety rails at the mast are standard, as are padeyes for jacklines. Also standard on newer boats is a spare main halyard and a storm trysail track on the mast.

The bowsprit has double rollers, and the anchor locker is divided into two compartments large enough for storage of 300 feet of rode.

Spaces belowdecks are well-lit and well-ventilated. Two Lewmar Ocean Series hatches are on the bow, three more are on the coachroof, and eight stainless-steel framed ports and four fixed portlights add illumination. There are four Dorade boxes with stainless steel cowls.

Saga 43

The builder succeeded in producing a cockpit with seats long enough for lounging. This cockpit is 79″ on the centerline forward of the wheel, and the footwell is 42″ wide. Seats are 7’6″ long, and 19″ wide, so a crew of eight can sit comfortably. The nonskid is “leather grained”— not the typical diamond pattern. It seems to provide good grip.

Primary winches on our test boat, hull #16, were Harken 56 self-tailers. Hoisting the mainsail, which is outfitted with a Harken Batt-Car system, is a matter of pressing a button that energizes the electric Harken 40 self-tailer on the cabintop. The mainsheet is housed on a traveler forward of the companionway, and, like the sheet for the self-tacking jib, is led to a winch at the companionway. Halyard tails and reefing lines can be tucked out of sight in cubbies in the coaming.

The wheel is a 40″ Edson stainless steel destroyer type that allowed two-finger steering during our test sail. A molded foot brace in the cockpit sole provided good support when steering while heeled 15-20°.

In addition to room for crew in the cockpit, there’s also a cavernous locker to starboard. The space is 51” deep and allows for storage of an inflatable dinghy and oars below spare sails, cleaning supplies, and fenders. A separate liferaft compartment is aft to starboard, as is a locker designed to house a 6-gallon gasoline tank for an outboard motor. Two 5-lb propane bottles live in a locker in the port corner.

Belowdecks The first impression upon stepping below is of spaciousness created by 6’5″ headroom, ample clearance amidships between settees, and light reflecting off hand-rubbed cherry and a white liner. The cabin sole is 1″ thick, with teak and holly veneer. The saloon measures 14′ on the centerline.

The common denominators of the three available interior layouts are galley and nav station to starboard, head and dining area to port.

The C-shaped galley is large enough for a chef and helper. The Corian countertop is 39″ wide and 21″ deep, with refrigerator and freezer located at the aft end below a cabinet designed to house a microwave. Standard equipment is a gimbaled three-burner Force 10 stove with oven. The owner told us that storage cabinets surrounding the space were adequate for a crew of three on a 19-day passage from Hawaii to San Francisco. The space is well ventilated by two opening ports.

The navigator sits on the settee and faces aft at a table measuring 36″ wide and 24″ deep—large enough to spread out a big section of chart.

The wiring behind the electric panel is excellent; removing two wing nuts allows the panel to swing down, providing instant access to wiring that is color coded, nicely bundled, and protected by Plexiglas boxes.

Though it sits in the center of the area, the 48″ long dining table is narrow enough with leaves down that it does not interfere with traffic forward, or access to settees. With leaves up, it is 54″ wide, adequate for seating four. Settees are 78″ long, and designed to convert to sea-berths.

Our test boat was equipped with a single head compartment, which was large enough to allow movement without banging into the bulkheads. Headroom is 6′ 2″. The space is surrounded by a seamless, molded pan nearly devoid of wood trim or grates that become greenhouses for mildew. A 16″ wide vanity and sink, mirror, storage cabinets, and toothbrush/cup holder are molded in the pan. Standing room in the shower is 26″ square, with an additional 13″ on a seat. The space is enclosed by a curved Plexiglas door that protects the main compartment from splashing water.

Saga 43

The boat was introduced with fore and aft staterooms and a second head in the bow. Beginning with hull #16, the forward head was eliminated. The most recent option is a queen-sized berth on an island on the centerline in the bow (not a good sea-berth, and not even good for sleeping in a rough harbor), with an optional head or closet.

Accommodations in the forward stateroom on our test boat included a queen-sized Pullman berth to port—far preferable for offshore sailing. There’s generous storage space in six pull-out drawers, a compartment outboard under the berth, and three cabinets on the hull, one with a 24″ wide hanging locker.

In the single-head configuration, the space forward of the stateroom is a 4’4″ x 5′ compartment that could be used as a workbench area (!) or extra storage area.

The berth in the aft stateroom is 80″ long and 72″ wide, and covered with 4″ thick cushions. Also in the cabin are a hanging locker and four large drawers—enough space for four sets of foulies and a moderate wardrobe. Spaces below the berth are occupied by batteries.

Aluminum tanks store diesel amidships on the centerline, and water port and starboard under the settees, and under the Pullman berth.

Construction Saga’s construction techniques reflect standard methods employed by the better builders in the industry. Hulls are sprayed with two layers of ISO-NPG gelcoat. The laminate is hand-laid and squeegeed to eliminate excess resin in the lamination. Two layers of vinylester resin are in the skin coat; polyester resins are in other layers.

The hull is cored with 3/4″ Baltek AL600 balsa sandwiched by four layers of chop and 2408 biaxial stitch mat on the exterior, and two layers on the interior. The 1-3/4″ thick bottom is solid fiberglass; additional reinforcing is on the centerline, at the keel, rudder, and mast step. The layup schedule for the deck is essentially the same, with core removed andsolid fiberglass reinforcements added in areas where hardware will be installed. Deck hardware is installed with aluminum backing plates.

Support for the hull is produced by an 18″ deep matrix frame constructed of 6 layers of 2408 mat, all of which are bonded to the hull, as are bulkheads and cabinetry. (These last are also bonded to the deck “where appropriate.”)

The hull-deck joint is a flange bonded with 3M 5200 and fasteners located on 4″ centers. Similarly, the aluminum toerail is bonded with 3M 5200 and through-bolted with aluminum washers and nuts.

The keel is cast lead, secured to the hull with two rows of 1″ keel bolts. The rudder stock is 2″ diameter stainless steel.

The mast and chainplates are grounded with 7AG copper wire for lightening protection. Seacocks are Marelon ball valves, and hoses are fitted with double clamps.

Performance We sailed hull #16 on San Francisco bay with Dwight Odom, a recent competitor in the Singlehanded Transpac, a 2,120-mile voyage from San Francisco to Hawaii. Though fit, Odom is in his 60s. This certainly speaks to the ease with which this 43- footer can be sailed.

Odom recorded boatspeeds of 14 knots sailing downwind in 35-40 knots of wind, flying a headsail and reefed main. We didn’t experience those conditions on our test sail.

She was not lightened for the test sail. We pulled away from the slip carrying a stainless steel wind vane on the stern, 300 feet of chain in the bow, provisions, and clothing.

Flying a full mainsail and 110% jib, and sailing as high on the breeze as possible without stalling the jib, speed reached 5.5 knots in 12 knots of true wind. When the wind freshened to 14-16 knots, our speed over the ground increased to 6.6 knots while sailing into a flooding tide under the Golden Gate Bridge. She was heeled 15-20 degrees, the helm was light, and she was in a comfortable groove.

Easing sheets and sailing between a close reach and a beam reach in 12 knots of true wind, the GPS recorded 8 knots, a half-knot faster than her polars indicate. As the breeze lightened we footed off to a broad reach and speed fluctuated between 7.9-8.2 knots. (This was now with a bit of current behind us.)

She also motors comfortably at 7-8 knots, though one owner claims to have pegged the speedo at 9 knots. Her standard engine is a 56- hp Yanmar fitted with a three bladed prop. A feathering prop will be important for the performance sailor.

One owner who kept close records of fuel consumption on a passage from the British Virgin Islands to the East Coast traveled at 8.2 knots at 3100 rpm, and 9 knots at 3600 rpm, with fuel consumption of about one gallon per hour.

Conclusions This boat was designed for serious sailors interested in maximizing performance and cruising in comfort. She’s faster than most production boats her size. The cockpit is large, and spaces below reflect Bob Perry’s ability to design comfortable accommodations.

The company’s warranty is fairly typical of the industry. It covers any defective workmanship and/or materials for a period of a year. Exceptions to this are a 5-year limited warranty on the hull structure, and 10-year limited warranty on gelcoat blistering and osmosis. The warranty is transferable to a second owner.

The boat was introduced with a $226,000 price tag, and owners have been rewarded with increases in resale value. Two used boats in the northeast recently sold for $299,000 and $295,000.

Prices of new boats have increased to $308,000 FOB the factory, reflecting upgrades and modifications to the interiors. Included in the upgrades are an electric windlass, six golf cart batteries, an inverter, and self-aligning rudder bearings. The nav station now houses a panel designed for a laptop.

Though somewhat more expensive than similar-sized boats produced by the major manufacturers, second-hand prices indicate that she’s a good investment. We think she’s a good sailing boat, too.

Contact- Saga Marine, 423 Lakeshore Rd., St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada L2R 7K6 800/560-7242.

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Shogun logo

THE SHOGUN 43

Be ahead of the rest.

Want a cruising yacht that effortlessly combines innovative design and ground-breaking technology, to make doublehanded sailing easy and fun – even at top speed? 

Enter the Shogun 43.  

Developed with a focus on performance and ease of use, this cruiser goes beyond conventional and traditional design, taking performance cruising to the next level. It is the yacht for you who love speed and want to sail fast without a crew. It is for you who want to have fun on the water and maximise your sailing experience every time you go out, but still want full interior comfort onboard. Shogun 43 gives you both.  

The interior of the Shogun 43 is developed to look and feel harmonious both from a sensory and auditory perspective. We wanted to create a quiet and cosy space with an interior that feels solid, and still is lightweight.

Thanks to a sleek design that can be customised specifically to your type of sailing, the Shogun 43 is a hybrid performer – whether its weekend hops or long distance cruising. Change your setup depending on the number of people onboard, weather conditions, type of sailing, preferred power, and overall experience.  

43' sailboat

Boat Shows 2024

Palma International Boat Show

Palma International Boat Show

The Shogun 43 will be on show at PIBS in Palma, April 25-28, 2024!

Ancora Yachtfestival

Ancora Yachtfestival

Germany's largest outdoor boat show! The Shogun 43 will be in Neustadt, May 31 - June 2, 2024.

Discover the speedmaker

See full video, rig & sail plan, tearing up the rulebook.

The Shogun 43 is designed to be fun and an absolute thrill to sail, which is why we have torn up the rulebook and discarded the notion of what a sail plan should look like. Instead, we have placed the mast further aft, behind the dining table, to get a bigger fore triangle base for headsails. This allows the Shogun 43 to have a 100% self-tacking jib which is a break from conventional Scandinavian yacht design.  

The large foretriangle base also gives the yacht multiple options for headsails. This gives Shogun 43 a flexible sail plan, which is easy to manage. Options for headsails allows you to easily choose how much horsepower you want in any given occasion. Change your setup depending on the type of sailing, weather conditions, preferred power, number of crew and overall experience. So even if the Shogun 43 is a high performer, you as a sailor decides how sensitive you want your Shogun to be.  

We have made this yacht with two different rig and keel options. Your choice depends on the style of sailor you are and what you want to achieve on the water. If you are looking for thrill and exhilaration, the rig with runners and a square top mainsail with a 2.7 m draft keel is the setup that will give you ultimate performance. If you are a more into short-handed sailing or prefer relaxed cruising, then chose the rig with regular backstay and a pinhead mainsail for the shallower 2.4 m keel. Regardless which option you chose, both have a mainsail large enough to always have enough power to help you leave other yachts in your wake.  

The Shogun 43 is as flexible as you want it to be.  

43' sailboat

DECK LAYOUT

Let's go doublehanded.

The exterior layout of the Shogun 43 is designed to be enjoyed by all kind of sailors, from keen racers to relaxed cruising yachtsmen – and especially if you are both. The unique addition of dual winches on the cabin top simplifies doublehanded sailing. Multiple onboard features are designed to remove the need for a crew the size of a football team normally required to set a kite.  

Are you wondering how to use both winch handles at the same time? You don’t. The pit winches are electric. Use the organisers to efficiently manage the halyards and control lines from either side of the cockpit.  

The standard jib tracks are placed on the coachroof to achieve an optimal trim angle and a good sail profile, even when not using the inhaulers. You can choose to have a second pair of tracks, conventionally placed down on the side deck, with floating inhaulers to maximise trim range. Alternatively, you can forgo the tracks on the coachroof and just have the ones on the side deck. It is also possible to add padeyes on the deck for genoa or outboard trim functions. 

All About the Atmosphere

While performance is at the heart of the Shogun 43, style and comfort reign below deck. The whole interior has a wood veneer finish, and the floor is made in a customisable, synthetic fibre. The yacht comes with thick, comfortable cushions clad in a luxurious fabric in the colour of your choice. Every area below deck has multiple design options, allowing you to tailor the yacht entirely to your aesthetic preferences.  

Underneath the wood veneer, the interior is built in using a flax fibre laminate sandwich construction with a divinycell core. The structural part of the interior is made in a similar way, but with carbon laminate, as it is stronger. Both laminates have the same low weight, but the flax resonates a more dampened sound when you touch it, creating a more relaxed atmosphere inside the yacht.  

Specifically for the Shogun, we utilised new solutions to make the fine interior lightweight.  Details, like the construction method of the of the corners, making them neither rounded nor straight – but rather like the vertices of a hexagon, cut the weight nearly in half compared to other cruising yachts. They are signature Shogun.  

The layout has three double berth cabins, one in the bow and two aft. and has the salon table placed forward in the centre, with the mast situated aft of the table. Three large and aligned skylights are located above the table, allowing the sky to enter the salon. Two couches, with large portlights behind them, stretch along on both sides of the salon. The L-shaped galley is located to port, opposite the spacious heads to starboard.

43' sailboat

CONSTRUCTION

Progressive technology.

The Shogun 43’s hull, deck, rig, rudders, and the structural elements of the interior are made entirely from carbon. Even the keel blade is made in carbon to maximise leverage, as the majority of the weight is then transferred to the bulb, giving the yacht better righting moment.    

The fusion of the hull and deck is done differently. Instead of placing the deck onto the hull and fusing them at the shear line, the Shoguns hull sides fuses by the inside of the deck by the cabin house. This why Shogun can have such a smooth and rounded shearline.  

When the hull and deck are laminated as one unit it ensures a stiffer structure. The bottom structure is then laminated in after the hull sides are fused.  

The cabin top and stern are laminated in individual forms and later fused with the hull. With this stiffer overall structure, the bulkheads become less significant. Allowing the Shogun 43 to have a divided bulkhead structure forward with three aligned skylights. This is the reason the yacht has an open interior that creates a spacious feel.  

All the carbon laminates are vacuum infused with epoxy and are created in collaboration with our partners and composite experts Vaxholm Komposit, Marstrom Composite and Linjett Yachts.  

Which colour are you?

Chili red, midnight blue, lime green or coffee? The Shogun 43 does not only stand out from the crowd through her design and aggressive lines, she also comes in a wide range of colour coatings. Why stick with white when there are a variety of unique and exclusive finishes that will make your Shogun even more you? Shogun Yachts offer colours from Axalta , previously only available for cars, which means you can get the Shogun 43 in any shiny, colourful coating – even metallic if you like.  

43' sailboat

Specifications

Displacement, bulb weight, 2660 kg (42%), 2.4 / 2.7 m, mast height (wl), selftacking jib, gennaker a2.5, yacht designer, oscar & håkan södergren.

43' sailboat

43' sailboat

Columbia 43

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Sceptre 43 Atlantic

  • By Quentin Warren
  • Updated: August 5, 2002

scep43at.gif

In what may be one of this industry’s more agreeable cases of déjà vu, the Newport (RI) boat show last September unveiled a nicely turned out rendition of a Pacific Northwest cruiser already well regarded, this time in the guise of the Sceptre 43 Atlantic. She is a rework of designer Hein Driehuyzen’s popular Sceptre 41, with two feet added to the stern to increase the effective waterline length, elongate the profile and provide space for a convenient sugar scoop transom. Preserved are the earlier boat’s joyful sailing qualities, strong construction pedigree and inside steering capability.

The 41 was a worthy vessel in her own right (see Cruising World June ’86, March ’92). The notion that you can incorporate a separate steering station below and avoid stacking the profile with a raised pilothouse or invoking the motorsailer moniker is fetching, especially in a boat designed for off-season or upper-latitude cruising. The 43, even sleeker with her added length, offers the same advantage. The beauty these days is that given the versatility and dependability of modern autopilot systems, you can opt for an electronic station in the saloon in lieu of another wheel, which allows the main cabin to remain in essence an unadulterated living space when it’s not being used as a command post.

Currently Sceptre Yachts is in the very able hands of Heather Rouse and her husband Jeff, an Australian-born shipwright whose involvement with the construction of these boats dates back to hull #14 of the original 41. The hull is solid glass, the deck cored with Baltek balsa. The keel is a prolonged fin, the rudder skeg-hung with three bearings — at the deck, just above the waterline and at the shoe. Primary steering in the aft cockpit is by way of Edson chain, cable and quadrant. The entry is fine, and hull sections are fairly deep to provide for good payload-carrying ability and a bilge that’s deep enough to accept milk crates. The installation of systems is first-class, stressing accessibility, redundancy and equipment right off the top shelf.

The rig is a custom-built two-spreader keel-stepped affair with cutter capability, fore and aft lowers and a set of “fixed” running backs. The chain plates are secured mechanically to four-inch aluminum pipe that runs fore and aft on each side of the hull, carried by massive fiberglass knees.

Our experience aboard the 43 Atlantic topped off a sparkling day on Long Island Sound last fall. True to form, the vessel is solid as a rock and quite beautifully put together abovedeck and below. In a steady 12 knots of true wind she jogged along to weather at 6 to 7 knots and remained remarkably nimble at the helm for a boat so designed to tackle serious bluewater cruising. On a broad reach she slid home beneath an asymmetrical kite flown off a conventional spinnaker pole that stores vertically on the mast when not in use. The 43 is balanced, powerful and responsive.

With her enhanced teak-finished interior, she’s also elegant and inviting. Here’s a boat with a million little details that make sense and a long-distance track record that’s been proven many times over. Pricing for the upscale Atlantic series is in the $330,000-$350,000 range. Contact Heather Rouse at Sceptre (1993) Ltd, 23-12491, No. 2 Road, Richmond, BC V7E 2C3, Canada; phone (604) 241-9331. Or Jake Leo at Northrop & Johnson, 100 Essex Street, PO Box 207, West Mystic, CT 06388; phone (860) 536-8087.

Sceptre 43 Atlantic Specifications:

  • Beam: 12’8″
  • Draft 6’1″ (deep): 5’9″ (shoal)
  • Disp: 21,500 lbs.
  • Ballast: 8,700 lbs.
  • Sail Area (100%): 774 sq.ft.
  • Mast above: DWL 59’0″
  • Disp/Length: 206
  • SA/Disp 16.01
  • Designer: Hein Driehuyzen
  • More: 41 - 50 ft , before 2000 , Bluewater Cruising , keelboat , monohull , Sailboat Reviews , Sailboats
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Watch CBS News

Suspected smugglers jettison bales of cocaine into Eastern Pacific Ocean during Coast Guard stop

By Aliza Chasan

February 26, 2024 / 6:43 PM EST / CBS News

The crew of the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Alert seized nearly 11,000 pounds of cocaine during a bust in the Eastern Pacific Ocean, officials said Monday. 

The cutter was on a 59-day narcotics patrol when its helicopter crew spotted a suspected "go-fast" vessel, which the FBI defines as a small, low-profile vessel favored by smugglers. After spotting the "go-fast" vessel, the cutter launched both of its small-boat pursuit teams. 

The Coast Guard ordered the vessel to stop, but it kept going, so the crew's helicopter disabled the "go-fast" vessel's engine. CBS News has reached out to the Coast Guard for details on how the engine was disabled. In the past, officials have said Coast Guard marksmen onboard the helicopters fire disabling shots.

coast guard cocaine seizure

The cutter's pursuit team caught up and gained control of the vessel, officials said. Members of the Coast Guard also recovered dozens of bales of cocaine jettisoned into the ocean by the suspected smugglers. They worked through the night to haul in and account for all the cocaine, valued at more than $143 million.

"The interdiction is among the Coast Guard's largest single interdictions in the Eastern Pacific and represents a major blow to the criminal organizations attempting to smuggle illicit narcotics through the maritime domain," the agency said in a news release.

The Coast Guard did not provide further details about the suspected smugglers.

Cocaine is classified as a schedule II controlled substance because of its high potential for abuse.

  • United States Coast Guard

Aliza Chasan is a digital producer at 60 Minutes and CBSNews.com. She has previously written for outlets including PIX11 News, The New York Daily News, Inside Edition and DNAinfo. Aliza covers trending news, often focusing on crime and politics.

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  • Sailboat Guide

Nauticat 43

Nauticat 43 is a 42 ′ 8 ″ / 13 m monohull sailboat designed by Sparkman & Stephens and built by Nauticat - Siltala Yachts between 1983 and 1999.

  • 1 / 7 Wrangell, AK, US 1985 Nauticat 43 $150,000 USD View
  • 2 / 7 Wrangell, AK, US 1985 Nauticat 43 $150,000 USD View
  • 3 / 7 Wrangell, AK, US 1985 Nauticat 43 $150,000 USD View
  • 4 / 7 Wrangell, AK, US 1985 Nauticat 43 $150,000 USD View
  • 5 / 7 Wrangell, AK, US 1985 Nauticat 43 $150,000 USD View
  • 6 / 7 Wrangell, AK, US 1985 Nauticat 43 $150,000 USD View
  • 7 / 7 Wrangell, AK, US 1985 Nauticat 43 $150,000 USD View

Rig and Sails

Auxilary power, accomodations, calculations.

The theoretical maximum speed that a displacement hull can move efficiently through the water is determined by it's waterline length and displacement. It may be unable to reach this speed if the boat is underpowered or heavily loaded, though it may exceed this speed given enough power. Read more.

Classic hull speed formula:

Hull Speed = 1.34 x √LWL

Max Speed/Length ratio = 8.26 ÷ Displacement/Length ratio .311 Hull Speed = Max Speed/Length ratio x √LWL

Sail Area / Displacement Ratio

A measure of the power of the sails relative to the weight of the boat. The higher the number, the higher the performance, but the harder the boat will be to handle. This ratio is a "non-dimensional" value that facilitates comparisons between boats of different types and sizes. Read more.

SA/D = SA ÷ (D ÷ 64) 2/3

  • SA : Sail area in square feet, derived by adding the mainsail area to 100% of the foretriangle area (the lateral area above the deck between the mast and the forestay).
  • D : Displacement in pounds.

Ballast / Displacement Ratio

A measure of the stability of a boat's hull that suggests how well a monohull will stand up to its sails. The ballast displacement ratio indicates how much of the weight of a boat is placed for maximum stability against capsizing and is an indicator of stiffness and resistance to capsize.

Ballast / Displacement * 100

Displacement / Length Ratio

A measure of the weight of the boat relative to it's length at the waterline. The higher a boat’s D/L ratio, the more easily it will carry a load and the more comfortable its motion will be. The lower a boat's ratio is, the less power it takes to drive the boat to its nominal hull speed or beyond. Read more.

D/L = (D ÷ 2240) ÷ (0.01 x LWL)³

  • D: Displacement of the boat in pounds.
  • LWL: Waterline length in feet

Comfort Ratio

This ratio assess how quickly and abruptly a boat’s hull reacts to waves in a significant seaway, these being the elements of a boat’s motion most likely to cause seasickness. Read more.

Comfort ratio = D ÷ (.65 x (.7 LWL + .3 LOA) x Beam 1.33 )

  • D: Displacement of the boat in pounds
  • LOA: Length overall in feet
  • Beam: Width of boat at the widest point in feet

Capsize Screening Formula

This formula attempts to indicate whether a given boat might be too wide and light to readily right itself after being overturned in extreme conditions. Read more.

CSV = Beam ÷ ³√(D / 64)

S&S #2239. Based on the earlier NAUTOR 43.

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1985 Nauticat 43 cover photo

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  1. Mason 43 boats for sale

    1979 Mason 43. US$79,000. Amantha Yacht Sales & Management | St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands. Request Info. <. 1. >. * Price displayed is based on today's currency conversion rate of the listed sales price. Boats Group does not guarantee the accuracy of conversion rates and rates may differ than those provided by financial institutions at the ...

  2. MASON 43

    43.83 ft / 13.36 m: LWL: ... Like the LWL, it will vary with the weights of fuel, water, stores and equipment. A boat's actual draft is usually somewhat more than the original designed or advertised draft. For boats with adjustable keels (centerboards, daggerboards, lifting and swing keels), Draft (max) is with the board down. ...

  3. Saga 43

    The partnership at Saga, however, was not a happy one, and was terminated in 1998. Poole subsequently purchased the molds, and reorganized the company as Saga Marine. It now employs 35 people in a 20,000-square foot facility, and produces 12 to 15 boats annually. In addition to the 43-footer, the company manufacturers a Perry designed 35-footer.

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    Find Beneteau Oceanis 43 boats for sale in your area & across the world on YachtWorld. Offering the best selection of Beneteau boats to choose from.

  5. Beneteau 43

    One such is the Beneteau 43, which I sailed in Tortola recently in its guise as the Moorings 43.4, the four-cabin version of the Oceanis 43 "family." You can also order the boat with just two large cabins with generous ensuite head compartments, or in a three cabin/three head layout.

  6. Shogun 43

    This allows the Shogun 43 to have a 100% self-tacking jib which is a break from conventional Scandinavian yacht design. The large foretriangle base also gives the yacht multiple options for headsails. This gives Shogun 43 a flexible sail plan, which is easy to manage. Options for headsails allows you to easily choose how much horsepower you ...

  7. Shannon Pilot 43 Sailboat Review

    These boats are built to go offshore and they have a history of success doing so. The 43 features a hand-laid composite hull consisting of Corecell linear PVC foam and a complicated schedule of biaxial laminates and Kevlar aramid that varies according to the stress requirements of different parts of the boat; premium vinylester resins and an ...

  8. Shannon 43

    Shannon 43 is a 43′ 9″ / 13.4 m monohull sailboat designed by Walter Shultz and built by Shannon Yachts starting in 1986. Great choice! Your favorites are temporarily saved for this session. ... The lower a boat's ratio is, the less power it takes to drive the boat to its nominal hull speed or beyond. Read more. Formula. D/L = (D ÷ 2240 ...

  9. 43 foot Sailboats for Sale

    Join millions of people using Oodle to find unique used boats for sale, fishing boat listings, jetski classifieds, motor boats, power boats, and sailboats. Don't miss what's happening in your neighborhood. ... 43 foot Sailboats for Sale (1 - 15 of 25) $175,000 43 foot HINCKLEY Hood 43

  10. GULFSTAR 43

    43.33 ft / 13.21 m: LWL: ... Like the LWL, it will vary with the weights of fuel, water, stores and equipment. A boat's actual draft is usually somewhat more than the original designed or advertised draft. For boats with adjustable keels (centerboards, daggerboards, lifting and swing keels), Draft (max) is with the board down. ...

  11. Columbia 43

    Construction. The Columbia 43's hull is heavily applied hand-laid fiberglass. The mast is keel-stepped. The boat has an iron-ballasted fin keel, spade rudder and was made in both full-keel and centerboard models. "The 43 is a solid boat from bow to stern," said Stuart Swain of Illinois, whose family has owned the 1970 Columbia 43 Rainbow for 34 ...

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    Here's a boat with a million little details that make sense and a long-distance track record that's been proven many times over. Pricing for the upscale Atlantic series is in the $330,000-$350,000 range. Contact Heather Rouse at Sceptre (1993) Ltd, 23-12491, No. 2 Road, Richmond, BC V7E 2C3, Canada; phone (604) 241-9331.

  13. Polaris 43

    Polaris 43 is a 42′ 8″ / 13 m monohull sailboat designed by Robert Perry and built by Chien Yu (TAIWAN) starting in 1979. Great choice! Your favorites are temporarily saved for this session. ... The lower a boat's ratio is, the less power it takes to drive the boat to its nominal hull speed or beyond. Read more. Formula. D/L = (D ÷ 2240 ...

  14. Endeavour 43 Sailboat Design History and Boat Specifications

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  15. SHANNON 43

    43.83 ft / 13.36 m: LWL: ... Like the LWL, it will vary with the weights of fuel, water, stores and equipment. A boat's actual draft is usually somewhat more than the original designed or advertised draft. For boats with adjustable keels (centerboards, daggerboards, lifting and swing keels), Draft (max) is with the board down. ...

  16. Suspected smugglers jettison bales of cocaine into Eastern Pacific

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  17. Gulfstar 43

    Gulfstar 43 is a 43′ 4″ / 13.2 m monohull sailboat designed by Vince & Richard Lazarra and built by Gulfstar Yachts between 1976 and 1978. ... The lower a boat's ratio is, the less power it takes to drive the boat to its nominal hull speed or beyond. Read more. Formula. D/L = (D ÷ 2240) ÷ (0.01 x LWL)³

  18. SWAN 43 (S&S)

    A Ballast/Displacement ratio of 40 or more translates into a stiffer, more powerful boat that will be better able to stand up to the wind. Bal./Disp = ballast (lbs)/ displacement (lbs)*100 Disp./Len.: The lower a boat's Displacement/Length (LWL) ratio, the less power it takes to drive the boat to its nominal hull speed. less than 100 ...

  19. Westsail 43

    Westsail 43 is a 42′ 10″ / 13.1 m monohull sailboat designed by William Crealock and built by Westsail Corporation starting in 1974. ... the more easily it will carry a load and the more comfortable its motion will be. The lower a boat's ratio is, the less power it takes to drive the boat to its nominal hull speed or beyond. Read more ...

  20. SERENDIPITY 43

    Serendipity 43 Owners: Related Sailboats: SERENDIPITY 43 R/C : Download Boat Record: Notes. Peterson design #77 and one of the most successful IOR racing designs. The first example of this design was Wings, constructed of C-Flex over a plywood jig in 1979. A mold was made from this boat's hull. 'Acadia' was a winner at the SORC series of 1980. ...

  21. Nauticat 43

    Nauticat 43 is a 42′ 8″ / 13 m monohull sailboat designed by Sparkman & Stephens and built by Nauticat - Siltala Yachts between 1983 and 1999. ... The lower a boat's ratio is, the less power it takes to drive the boat to its nominal hull speed or beyond. Read more. Formula. D/L = (D ÷ 2240) ÷ (0.01 x LWL)³

  22. PEARSON 43

    43.50 ft / 13.26 m: E: ... Like the LWL, it will vary with the weights of fuel, water, stores and equipment. A boat's actual draft is usually somewhat more than the original designed or advertised draft. For boats with adjustable keels (centerboards, daggerboards, lifting and swing keels), Draft (max) is with the board down. ...

  23. NAUTICAT 43

    Related Sailboats: NAUTOR 43 : Download Boat Record: Notes. S&S #2239. Based on the earlier NAUTOR 43. Sailboat Forum. View All Topics: ... A Ballast/Displacement ratio of 40 or more translates into a stiffer, more powerful boat that will be better able to stand up to the wind. Bal./Disp = ballast (lbs)/ displacement (lbs)*100