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The Definitive Guide To Boat Flag Shapes and Sizes

The Definitive Guide To Boat Flag Shapes and Sizes

Boat Flag Shapes

Do you know the difference between a boat flag and a boat pennant? How about the difference between a boat flag and a burgee? If not, don't worry - you're about to learn! In this blog post, we will discuss all the different boat flag sizes and shapes. We'll provide information on what each type of boat flag is used for, as well as tips on choosing the right size and shape for your needs.

Boat flags come in a variety of shapes and sizes, but the most common boat flag shape is rectangular. Rectangular boat flags are typically used for decorative purposes , such as flying your country's flag or displaying your boat's name and home port.

flag size for sailboat

Pennants are another popular boat flag shape - they are long and narrow, and often have a pointed end. Pennants are often used to signal distress or indicate that a boat is entering or leaving port.

flag size for sailboat

Burgees are another type of boat flag, and they are usually triangular in shape. Burgees are typically used by yacht clubs or other organizations as a way to identifying their members.

flag size for sailboat

When choosing a boat flag, it's important to consider both the shape and the size. The shape of the flag should be appropriate for the purpose you're using it for, and the size should be appropriate for the boat you're flying it on. If you have any questions about boat flags, or if you need help choosing the right size or shape for your needs, please don't hesitate to contact us - we're always happy to help!

Boat Flag Sizes

The size of a boat flag also varies, but the most common boat flag size is 12 inches by 18 inches. This size is large enough to be seen from a distance, but not so large that it will be blown away in strong winds. This size is large enough to be seen from a distance, but not so large that it will be blown away in strong winds. A general rule is one inch of length for every foot in boat length. It doesn't need to be followed exactly, but gives a good guideline.

If you have a small boat, you may want to choose a smaller flag size. For example, a boat flag size of six inches by nine inches is often used on small boats. This size is still visible from a distance, but it won't overpower the boat or get blown away in strong winds.

It's also important to consider the wind conditions when choosing a boat flag size. If you know you'll be sailing in windy conditions, you may want to choose a larger flag size. A boat flag size of 18 inches by 24 inches is often used in windy conditions. This size will ensure that your flag is visible, even in strong winds.

Common Boat Flag Size and Shape Questions:

Question: What size flag do I need for a 30 foot boat?

Answer: A boat flag size of 18 inches by 24 inches is often used on boats this size.

Question: Can I fly a flag on a pontoon boat?

Answer: Yes you can! Pontoon boats are perfect vessels for flying flags .

Question: What size flag do you fly on a boat?

Answer: The most common boat flag size is 12 inches by 18 inches.

Question: What shape boat flag do I need?

Answer: The shape of the boat flag should be appropriate for the purpose you're using it for. The most common boat flag shape is rectangular.

Question: What is the difference between a boat flag and a boat pennant?

Answer: Pennants are long and narrow, and often have a pointed end. Pennants are often used to signal distress or indicate that a boat is entering or leaving port.

Question: How big is a standard boat flag?

Answer: They can be almost any size, we offer flags in 12" by 18" and 3' by 5'.

Question: Are nautical flags square or rectangle?

Answer: Boat flags come in a variety of shapes and sizes, but the most common boat flag shape is rectangular. Rectangular boat flags are typically used for decorative purposes . Square flags are used for signaling.

Question: What are the 3 sizes of the flag?

Answer: The three sizes of the flag are the width, height, and mast length.

Question: What flag do you put on a boat?

Answer: The only required flag for a boat in the US is The U.S. national ensign, sometimes called "50-star" or "Old Glory." It is the proper and preferred flag for all U.S. vessels. Your boat should wear it from 0800 until sunset, and when you enter or leave port during daylight or at night, weather and rig permitting. After that you can have fun boat flags , signal flags, club pennants, pirate flags , and just about anything else you can think of.

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Anchoring clearance, standing rigging clearance, running rigging clearance, deck hardware clearance, chandlery clearance, safety clearance, yacht flags sizing guide, traditional yard sizing for flags.

The yard sizing (traditional diagonal measurement) is nominal and may vary slightly due to the nature of the production/sewing process.

  • The Yard Size refers to the outside diagonal measurement, e.g. from the top corner of the hoist to the bottom corner of the fly end.
  • The fly is measured along the horizontal length, top or bottom.
  • The hoist is measured down the vertical length of the left-hand side next to the staff.
  • The Fly end is the opposite end to the hoist = the end that flies in the breeze.

The yard sizing (traditional diagonal measurement) is nominal and may vary slightly due to the nature of the production/sewing process.

Nominal length and height measurements are tabled in the guide below.

Selecting the appropriate size for your Courtesy Flags:

Generally, yachts up to about 60 feet (18 metres) in length look properly "dressed" with half yard (18" x 12" or 45x30cm) courtesy flags.

There is a smaller size range (12"x8") not available from Jimmy Green because these flags look insignificant from deck level when hoisted aloft.

There is an old rule of thumb for courtesy flags: a half inch on the fly for every foot of overall vessel length, e.g. 18 inches = ½ yard for a 36-foot yacht.

3/4 yard Courtesy Flags are available for larger yachts or skippers who wish to 'make a statement'.

What Size Ensign do I Need?

As a guide, your Ensign should be proportionate to the LOA and the style/design of the yacht.

An old rule of thumb for the size of your Ensign is an inch per foot of yacht length, but this may look rather small for modern yachts to look "well dressed".

The Ensign hoist measurement also needs to be compatible with the length of the flagstaff. i.e. The length of the flagstaff between the truck (head) and the cleat must be, at the very least, greater than the hoist measurement so there is sufficient room to tension the hoist line or halyard.

The gap between the bottom of the hoist and the cleat is a matter of personal choice.

A more modern interpretation of suitable Red Ensign yard size is suggested in the chart below, but...

Ultimately, the size of a Red Ensign is entirely up to the owner's discretion, and if it looks right, then it is right.

Flag Size Chart - Printed and Standard Sewn
Yard Size Finish Fly Hoist Staff Length Yacht LOA
1/2 Printed 48cm 32cm 60cm < 7m
3/4 Printed or Sewn 69cm 40cm 60/80cm 6-9m
1 Printed or Sewn 90cm 45cm 80/100cm 9-12m
1 1/4 Printed or Sewn 104cm 56cm 90/120cm 10-14m
1 1/2 Printed or Sewn 132cm 70cm 100/125cm 12-16m
2 Sewn 180cm 90cm 125/150cm 14-18m
2 1/2 Sewn 225cm 110cm > 1.5 metres 18m-20m
3 Sewn 274cm 137cm > 2 metres >20m
Flag Size Chart - Premium Sewn
Yard Size Fly Hoist Staff Length Yacht LOA
1/2 45cm 22cm 60cm < 7m
3/4 70cm 35cm 60-80cm 6-9m
1 93cm 46cm 80/100cm 9-12m
1 1/4 114cm 57cm 90/120cm 10-14m
1 1/2 143cm 75cm 100/125cm 12-16m
2 180cm 94cm 125/150cm 14-18m
2 1/2 225cm 110cm > 1.5 metres 18m-20m
3 274cm 137cm > 2 metres >20m

Flag Size Chart Glossary: Yard Size: the traditional method of measurement = length of the diagonal Finish: Sewn = individual panels stitched together to complete the flag

Finish: Printed =  one screen-printed piece of fabric Fly: nominal length, may vary slightly due to the nature of the production/sewing process Hoist: nominal height, may vary slightly due to the nature of the production/sewing process Staff Length: the length overall of the flagstaff N.B. the measurement between the truck and the cleat will be less than the overall length LOA = Yacht Length Overall

Flag Toggles

Top-quality wooden toggles are available at a reasonable cost and can be fitted to the loop at the top of the hoist if required:

Wooden Flag TOGGLES

Ensign on Roshni

A Yard and a Half Sewn Red Ensign on Roshni, Azuree 46

Ensign on Max

A Yard and a Half Printed Red Ensign on Max, Moody 47

Choosing between Printed and Sewn Flags:

Printed courtesy flags are generally accepted everywhere you may visit.

Sewn courtesy flags may prove far too expensive on an extended voyage.

Printed courtesy flags are lighter and therefore fly better in a light breeze.

However, there are two distinct schools of thought regarding your Red Ensign (or national flag), and either is acceptable.

  • Printed - is less than half the cost and ‘will soon be blown out anyway'.
  • Sewn - is the only proper flag to fly, will last longer and is worth 'every penny.'

Shop for Flags

AllStar Flags

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Flag Sizes for Boats | Nautical Flag Sizes | All Star Flags

Nautical Flag Sizing

Length of Boat Size of Private & Club Signal Size of Yacht Ensign
-20 ft 8" x 12" 12" x 18"
20 ft 10" x 15" 12" x 18"
25 ft 10" x 15" 16" x 24"
30 ft 12" x 18" 16" x 24"
35 ft 12" x 18" 24" x 36"
40 ft 14" x 21" 24" x 36"
45 ft 14" x 21" 24" x 36"
50 ft 16" x 24" 2.5' x 4'
55 ft 16" x 24" 2.5' x 4'
60 ft 20" x 30" 2.5' x 4'
70 ft 20" x 30" 3' x 5'
80 ft 24" x 36" 3' x 5'
90 ft 24" x 36" 4' x 6'
100 ft 30" x 48" 4' x 6'

20 ft 10" x 15" 16" x 24"
25 ft 10" x 15" 16" x 24"
30 ft 12" x 18" 24" x 36"
35 ft 14" x 21" 24" x 36"
40 ft 14" x 21" 24" x 36"
45 ft 16" x 24" 2.5' x 4'
50 ft 20" x 30" 2.5' x 4'
60 ft 20" x 30" 2.5' x 4'
70 ft 24" x 36" 3' x 5'
80 ft 24" x 36" 3' x 5'
90 ft 30" x 48" 4' x 6'
100 ft 30" x 48" 4' x 6'

By Chad Creech, All Star Flags

  • What flags to fly and where to put them on your boat

For many a recreational sailor, the same questions come to mind every year. Where should I place the flag? And how big should it be? Can I fly the national flag? At sea you’ll often come across a less experienced crew, who seem to have fully-dressed the boat, having decorated it with flags like a Christmas tree. So let's clear up the issue. It never hurts to go over the basic principles, which are actually very simple. So where does which flag belong and what do they mean?

The place at the stern of a yacht is reserved exclusively for one thing: 

The Ensign (the national flag of the country under which the boat is registered)

This is the most important flag, which says the most about the boat and crew. This is because ships have the nationality of the state whose flag they fly under (this right is granted by the state together with the issuing of the relevant documents). Ships are then subject to the exclusive jurisdiction of that state on the high seas (which, of course, results in a number of interesting situations). Please note that on coastal seas, the law of the state whose waters you pass through also applies to the vessel. 

Where is it flown?  

At the stern, ideally on the flagpole (pushpit) or on the stern forestay (flying the flag depends on whether the ship is sailing or mooring). And it must be the largest flag on the ship

This flag should be flown in the correct manner from sunrise to sunset. It must always be hoisted first and lowered last. No other flag may be flown unless the national flag (ensign) is also flown.

How big should the flag be? According to the decree, the flag (if it is the ensign of a boat) should, for example, have a size of 0.75 x 0.50 m (on a recreational yacht).

flag size for sailboat

Don't overlook other useful tips:

What to pack for a tropical sailing, skippered boats: how to pack for a yachting holiday, don’t panic: handling maritime emergencies, sextant and navigation: survival without gps, the ultimate yacht cleaning kit, new year's resolution: let's sail more eco, how to sail a yacht on a tailwind, how to sail a yacht in crosswinds, how to have a nautical christmas, the starboard spreader.

The starboard spreader is reserved for courtesy flags. They are flown immediately after the ensign and lowered last before it. What flags should they commonly be?

 The flag of the state in whose waters you are sailing

It is placed under the starboard spreader and it isn’t just a courtesy to do so, it is a duty.

However, if you are sailing in Croatia on a Croatian ship, there is no need to fly a courtesy flag.

Boat owner’s flag

The yacht owner can also fly their own national flag on the boat. It can be placed on the starboard spreader, but if the owner deems it appropriate it can be flown on the port side, as it is a flag of lower importance (than the ensign).

The spreader is a mast reinforcement (between the mast and the shroud). It is placed on the mast perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the ship (or points slightly to the stern) and is at right angles to the mast.

flag size for sailboat

The Port Spreader

All other flags are flown under the port spreader. So what are the other flags you can fly on the yacht?

Signal flags

Signal flags

Your national flag

Yes, right here is the place for your own national flag when sailing in Croatia on a Croatian boat.

A burgee is a flag bearing the colours or emblem of a sailing club and should be flown from the main masthead. If this isn’t feasible it should be below the port spreader.

Flags of the nationalities of the crew members

Flags of the countries you’ve visited during the voyage, etc..

How large can the other flags be? They should always be smaller than the ensign. 

Flags of the nationalities of the crew members

Special flags and occasions

Can i fly a pirate flag .

The international agreement UNCLOS (United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea) speaks for itself. Stateless ships, ships flying a foreign flag and ships refusing to fly their ensign may be detained and inspected by warships or civil service ships, even on the high seas.

So if you are flying under a pirate flag out of ignorance or innate rebellion :) (i.e. you hang it on the place where the ensign belongs) you definitely risk an interesting experience. But also be careful not to hang in less risky places, for example, where the burgee should be as there are places and ports where you could get a pretty hefty fine.

flag size for sailboat

How to greet other boats with the flag?

A sharp shot from a cannon is a thing of the past. When ships meet, instead of a verbal greeting you dip the ensign. And after the same response from the other boat it can be raised again. But who greets who first? A merchant ship is first when meeting a warship, a smaller vessel of the same flag when greeting a larger one and when two merchant ships of the same type meet, it is the one with the more junior commanding officer.

When ships meet on the high seas, it is customary to add a port salute. Dipping the flag is accompanied by three prolonged blasts of the horn and the same response is acknowledged with one short blast.

Do you know what dressing the ship is? 

Dressing the ship consists of flying national flags on top of the masts and stringing signal flags over the tops of the masts to connect the bow and stern.

When is dressing done? It is a sign of celebration and is done on national holidays. However it can it can be done in a lesser way at the order of the ship's captain on special occasions. The national flags are again placed on the tops of the masts accompanied by flying at least four signal flags from both ends of the mast boom.

Would you also like to set sail and enjoy an adventure at sea? Whether you want to sail under the Croatian, Italian or Greek flags, you’ll find everything you need with us.

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Boat Flags & Boat Flag Etiquette

The United States Flag Code provides advisory rules for display and care of the American Flag, but there are also specific guidelines for flying flags on recreational boats. In fact, boat flag etiquette not only ensures that the flag is displayed respectfully, it actually helps boaters to identify one another and communicate while on open water.

Boat Flags: When & Where to Fly Them

The five most common types of boat flags are Ensign, Burgee, Private Signal, Courtesy and Signal Flags.

National Ensign Flags

Ensign Flag

The ensign flag is the largest, most important flag on a boat because it identifies the nation of origin. The preferred U.S. national ensign flag is the traditional American Flag , however, the United States Yacht Ensign may be flown in its place, provided the boat remains in domestic waters. Similar to the Betsy Ross Flag , but with a fouled anchor in the center of the 13 stars, the yacht ensign should never be used in international or foreign waters.

Always flown off the stern, on a staff-pole that is long and angled, the ensign may be offset to one side to allow it to fly clear of the rigging and engine exhaust. In addition, American boat flags should only be flown from 8:00 am until sunset, and when entering or leaving port during daylight or at night, weather and rig permitting. When leaving your boat in port, the flag should be taken down if you will not return before sunset.

Burgee Flags

Typically triangular or swallow-tailed in shape, the burgee flag is a small flag with a symbol signifying the skipper’s sailing organization or yacht club. Many yacht clubs have rules about when their burgees are flown, but generally speaking, burgee flags are flown from the bow staff or under the starboard spreader. These flags are flown day and night, and follow the skipper from boat to boat.

Private Signal Flags

Private signal flags are personal flags, sometimes referred to as house flags, which are custom designed and made specifically for the boat owner. Custom Boat Flags usually feature a personal interest, hobby, family tradition, initials or some other symbol to identify the boat owner. These boat flags are flown day and night, but only when the owner is in command of the boat. Custom boat flags are flown at the head of the aftermost mast, from the bow staff on mastless vessels, or on the starboard rigging below the burgee.

Courtesy Flags

To show respect, courtesy flags are flown when entering or operating a boat in foreign waters and, in some instances, when there is someone from a foreign country on the boat. Courtesy flags represent the host nation or state in whose waters you are traveling, and are flown from the starboard spreader on a sailboat, the starboard spreader of a powerboat with a mast, or the bow staff of a mastless boat.

Signal Flags

Signal Flags are an international standard in maritime, used for nautical ship-to-ship communication, primarily related to safety and navigation. Each signal flag corresponds to a number or letter of the alphabet, and when displayed by itself or in conjunction with other letters and numbers, the flags relay important messages and information to other vessels. Although radio transmissions have largely replaced the use of signal flags, they are still required on commercial vessels and in foreign ports of call.

Signal Flags

Other Boat Flags

Fishing boats often fly flags denoting their catch. Known as Fishing Flags , these boat flags can feature marlin, sailfish, tuna, albacore, tarpon, wahoo, striped bass, bluefish, shark, mako shark, king mackerel, swordfish and more. They are flown from the port outrigger or spreader, and are flown upside down if the catch is released.

Gettysburg Flag Works also carries a variety of Nautical & Marine Ensigns , as well as Jolly Roger Pirate Flags , and several fun and humorous boat flags, including Mother-in-Law On Board , Baby on Board , Wife On Board and Husband on Board .

Boat Flags: How to Order

When ordering an ensign, or American Boat Flag , we recommend a flag that measures one inch for each foot of boat length. For smaller vessels, a 12x18” flag is usually suffice, while larger boats may opt for the 2x3’ flag. Burgee and personal Custom Boat Flags are generally smaller than the ensign, but can measure up to half an inch for each foot above water of the tallest mast.

Need help ordering a flag for your boat? The flag experts at Gettysburg are happy to help. Give us a call at 1-888-697-3524 or contact us online .

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Flag etiquette has been transmitted to us by generations of mariners. Although not often appropriately respected these days, especially not by charterers, we might add, observing flag etiquette can provide some pride of perpetuating a very old tradition as well as some fun. We will not get into deep details and purist fanaticism. However, we will try to show charterers the minimum that is expected for basic respect of rules.

Therefore, we will only talk here about 4 main flags, potentially used by charterers and charter boat owners: the Ensign or the National flag; the club burgee; the Private Signal; and the Courtesy Flags.

Boats should fly the National Flag. Most pleasure boats in US waters have a choice of 2.

The yacht ensign, with its fouled anchor over a circle of 13 stars, the "Betsy Ross" flag. Originally restricted to documented vessels only, it is now commonly flown on recreational boats of all types and sizes instead of the National Flag (see picture).

The 50-star flag "Old Glory" you are familiar with.

The appropriate time to fly the ensign is from 0800 to sunset, except when racing. It is also important to take the flag down prior to leaving the yacht if the ship will be unmanned at the time of sunset.

However, whenever a boat is taken into international or foreign waters, the 50-star U.S. ensign is the proper flag to fly and the yacht ensign cannot to be displayed . In other words, if you own a US boat in the British Virgin Islands, you should not fly the Ensign, but the National Flag.

Boats today fly the ensign from the stern, which provides the best visibility, but it can also be flown from the leech of the most aftersail. When flown from the stern, it should be on a staff (pole) that is sufficiently long and angled, and that is offset to one side (traditionally the starboard side), so the flag flies clear of engine exhaust and rigging.

It is a small flag displaying the symbol of the skipper's yacht club or other sailing organization. It may be flown day and night.

Most people opt to fly the burgee lower in the rig, hoisted to the end of the lowest starboard spreader on a thin flag halyard. While purists rail this practice, it is an accepted adaptation of another tradition, which is that the starboard rigging is a position of honor (when you visit a foreign port, that's where we fly the host country's flag). Besides being reasonable, flying the burgee in the starboard rigging is such a widespread custom that to try to end it would be close to impossible.

Private Signal

It is a small, custom-designed and custom-made flag that carries symbols standing for the owner, so it can basically be anything. The signal may be flown day or night, but is not displayed when another sailor is in command. (The rule is: the private signal and burgee follow the sailor, not the boat.)

On a multi-masted boat, the private signal is flown at the head of the aftermost mast. On a sloop, the private signal may be flown from the starboard rigging, either below the burgee or alone.

Courtesy Flags

As a matter of courtesy, it is appropriate to fly the flag of a foreign nation on your boat when you enter and operate on its waters. There are only a limited number of positions from which flags may be displayed. Therefore, when a flag of another nation is flown, it usually must displace one of the flags displayed in home waters. However, it is hoisted only after the appropriate authorities have granted clearance. Until clearance is obtained, a boat must fly the yellow "Q" flag . All charter boats should carry the national flags of neighboring islands as well as the yellow flag, in case charterers want to visit those islands.

The courtesy flag is flown at the boat's starboard spreader, whether the United States ensign is at the stern staff, or flown from the leech. If there is more than one mast, the courtesy flag is flown from the starboard spreader of the forward mast.

As a side note, some authorities are not amused at all if you fly their courtesy flag using an old, raggy flag. Some will even fine you for disrespect! It happened to a friend of mine who was chartering in Turkey.

Lastly, it is also a common courtesy to fly the national flag(s) of your guest(s) on board, if they have a different nationality than the ensign is showing.

Flags' Dimensions

Flags come in standardized sizes, but there are guidelines about selecting the proper size for your boat.

The size of a nautical flag is determined by the size of the boat that flies it. Flags are more often too small than too large. So in the rules below, round upward to the nearestlarger standard size.

The flag at the stern of your boat: U.S. ensign or national flag should be about one inch for each foot of overall length. For example, on a 40ft. boat, the ensign should be 40 in. i.e. about 3.5ft.

Other flags, such as club burgees, private signals and courtesy flags used on sailboats should be approximately 1/2 inch for each foot of the highest mast above the water. For example, on a 30ft. boat, with 50ft. between the masthead and the water, the burgee should be about 25 in. The shape and proportions of pennants and burgees will be prescribed by the organization which they relate to.

Raising and Lowering Flags

Fly the ensign from morning (8:00 a.m.) to evening (sunset) whether the boat is at rest, under sail, or under power. The exception to this rule is: The ensign is not flown by a boat in a race, which signals to other boats that you are racing.

To prevent wear and tear, the flag may not be flown when out of sight of other vessels or when nobody is aboard. The flag is flown while entering or leaving a port, even at night. For purists: In the morning, the ensign is hoisted rapidly before other flags. In the evening, it is lowered slowly and with ceremony after other flags come down.

Additional sources:  Seaflags http://www.usps.org/f_stuff/etiquett.html

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Flag Size Guideline

Flag size guide, for home wall-mounted flagpoles.

2' x 3', 2-½' x 4', 3' x 5'

For in-ground flagpoles

The rule of thumb is that the fly of the flag (the length or long dimension) should be 1/3 to ¼ the height of the flagpole. For example, if you have a 20' flagpole, ¼ of that is 5, so the fly of the flag should be 5'. This means that you need a 3' x 5' flag!

For Powerboat Flags*

Use a 12" x 18" Flag

Use a 16" x 24" Flag

Use a 20" x 30" Flag

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Use a 30" x 48" Flag

For Sailboat Length*

Use a 10" x 15" Flag

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Use a 30" x 48"

Use a 3' x 5' Flag

Use a 4' x 6' Flag

*Flagstuff may not carry all flag sizes

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  • Sailboat Flag Etiquette

Sailboat Flag Etiquette: What You Need to Know

Sailboat flag etiquette is steeped in maritime tradition and enshrined in law. If you're new to the world of sailing, you may have wondered about the various flags that you see flying on other sailboats or that you are expected to fly on your own. What do they mean? How should they be displayed? What are the rules and traditions that govern them?

Flag etiquette on Bowman 57

An experienced sailboat skipper will know that flag etiquette is a way of showing respect, courtesy and recognition to other vessels, countries and organizations.

It also helps you communicate important information, such as your nationality, your club affiliation, your intentions or your distress.

For the less experienced we'll explain the basics of sailboat flag etiquette and how it should be applied in practice:

  • The types of flags that you can fly on your boat;
  • The sizes and positions of the flags;
  • The occasions and situations when you should fly certain flags;
  • The common mistakes and pitfalls to avoid when flying flags.

The skipper of the Bowman 57 staysail ketch shown here is correctly flying a burgee (the Flying Fish burgee of the Ocean Cruising Club ) from the port spreader, and a courtesy ensign (of Spain in this case) from the starboard spreader.

The ensign, in this case that of the Republic of Ireland, is flown from a flag halyard fom the mizzen mast to the end of the missen boom. Alternatively the ensign could be flown from a staff attached to the taffrail.

The Types of Flags

There are many types of flags that you can fly on your boat, but the most common ones are:

  • The ensign: This is the flag that shows the country of registry of your boat and indicates its nationality. It is usually flown at the stern of the boat, as close as possible to the waterline. It is the most senior position for a flag on a boat and it should always be larger than any other flag. A UK flagged boat (sail or power) must wear the national maritime flag, the Red Ensign, unless entitled to wear a special ensign.

Yachtclub burgee at masthead

  • The burgee: This is the flag that shows the yacht club or association that you belong to. It is usually flown at the main masthead of the boat above any other flag, but can be flown from the port spreader unless otherwise stipulated under a special warrant. 
  • The courtesy flag: This is the flag that shows the national flag of the country that you are visiting or whose waters you are sailing in. It is a sign of respect and goodwill to the host country and it should be flown at the starboard spreader. It should be hoisted as soon as you enter foreign waters and lowered as soon as you leave them.
  • The Q flag: This is a yellow flag that indicates that you are requesting clearance from the local authorities when entering a foreign port. It is also flown at the starboard spreader of the boat, below the courtesy flag if there is one. It should be hoisted before you enter the port and lowered after you have been cleared.
  • The signal flags: These are flags that have specific meanings in the International Code of Signals. They can be used to spell out messages or to convey information such as your position, your course, your speed, your intentions or your distress. They can be flown individually or in combinations at various locations on the boat.
  • The private signal: This is a personal or family flag that has no official meaning or recognition. It can be flown at the port spreader of the boat, below any other flag. It is optional and purely decorative.

The Sizes and Positions of the Flags

The sizes and positions of the flags on your boat are important for both aesthetic and practical reasons. They should be proportionate to your boat size, visible from a distance and clear from any obstruction.

The general rules for sizing and positioning flags are:

  • The ensign should be one inch on the fly (the length) for every foot of overall length of your boat. It should be flown on the stern staff or on a gaff if there is one.

Ensign incorrectly flown at top of mizzen

  • The burgee should be half an inch on the fly for every foot of overall length of your sailboat or five-eighths of an inch for every foot of overall length of your powerboat. It should be flown at the main masthead or on a pigstick (a vertical extension) if there is one.
  • The courtesy flag should be the same size as the burgee or slightly smaller. It should be flown at the starboard spreader, preferably on its own halyard.
  • The Q flag should be the same size as the courtesy flag or slightly smaller. It should be flown at the starboard spreader, below the courtesy flag if there is one, on its own halyard.
  • The signal flags should be sized according to their function and meaning. They can be flown individually or in combinations at various locations on the boat, such as the masthead, the yardarm, the bow or the stern of the boat.
  • The private signal should be the same size as the burgee or slightly smaller. It should be flown at the port spreader, below any other flag, on its own halyard.

The Occasions and Situations When You Should Fly Certain Flags

The occasions and situations when you should fly certain flags on your boat depend on where you are, what you are doing and who you are with. Some flags are mandatory, some are optional and some are forbidden.

The general rules for flying flags are:

  • You must fly your ensign at all times in daylight, especially when near to or in sight of land or another boat. You must also fly your ensign when entering or leaving a foreign port and on demand. You can fly your ensign at night if you wish, but it is not required.
  • You can fly your burgee at any time, but it is customary to hoist it at 0800 and lower it at sunset. You can also fly your burgee at night if you wish, but it is not required.
  • You must fly the courtesy flag of the country that you are visiting or whose waters you are sailing in as soon as you enter their jurisdiction and until you leave it. You must also fly the Q flag when entering a foreign port until you have been cleared by the local authorities. You can lower the Q flag after you have been cleared, but you should keep the courtesy flag until you leave the port or the country.
  • You can fly signal flags whenever you need to communicate with other boats or shore stations using the International Code of Signals. You can also fly signal flags for decorative purposes, such as dressing your boat for a special occasion, but you should avoid using flags that have specific meanings or that could cause confusion.
  • You can fly your private signal whenever you want, but it has no official significance or recognition. It is purely a personal or family emblem.

The Common Mistakes and Pitfalls to Avoid When Flying Flags

Flying flags on your boat can be fun and rewarding, but it can also be tricky and challenging. There are some common mistakes and pitfalls that you should avoid when flying flags, such as:

  • Flying an incorrect, damaged, wrongly sized or otherwise invalid ensign. This is a breach of law and etiquette and could lead to fines or penalties.
  • Flying a special ensign without being entitled to do so. This is a privilege granted by a warrant from the Admiralty or by an Act of Parliament and it requires certain conditions to be met.
  • Flying a burgee that does not match your ensign or that is higher than your ensign. This is a sign of disrespect and ignorance and could offend other boats or authorities.
  • Flying more than one burgee at a time. This is considered sloppy and excessive and could imply that you are showing off or indecisive.
  • Flying a courtesy flag that is larger than your burgee or that is above your burgee on the same halyard. This is a sign of subservience and inferiority and could insult your own country or club.
  • Flying a Q flag when you have already been cleared or when you are leaving a port. This is unnecessary and confusing and could cause delays or misunderstandings.
  • Flying signal flags that have specific meanings or that could cause confusion for decorative purposes. This is irresponsible and dangerous and could lead to accidents or incidents.
  • Flying a private signal that resembles an official flag or that has an offensive meaning. This is misleading and rude and could provoke anger or hostility.
  • And you should never, ever, fly a skull-and-crossbones flag. There is nothing amusing or glamorous about pirates.

Sailboat Flag Etiquette: A Few FAQs...

Why do some British sailboats fly a White or Blue Ensign rather than the traditional Red Ensign?

Some British sailboats fly a white or blue ensign because they belong to certain yacht clubs or organisations that have special permission to use these ensigns.

The white ensign is a variation of the national flag that is normally used by the Royal Navy, but it can also be worn by yachts owned by members of the Royal Yacht Squadron , which is a privileged yacht club with a long history and close ties to the monarchy.

The blue ensign is another variation of the national flag that is normally used by government vessels, but it can also be worn by yachts that belong to one of the 32 yacht clubs or associations that have a warrant from the Admiralty or the relevant authority to use the undefaced blue ensign.

Additionally, some yachts can wear a blue ensign defaced with the badge of their club or association, if they have a warrant for that as well. There are 57 yacht clubs or associations that have this privilege.

These special or privileged ensigns are considered a mark of distinction and honour, and they should only be flown with proper authorisation and following the rules and regulations of wearing them.

What is the difference between an ensign and a burgee?

An ensign is a flag that shows the nationality of the vessel and must be worn at the stern or as close to it as possible. A burgee is a flag that shows the membership of a yacht club or sailing association and can be worn at the masthead or the port spreader.

What is a special ensign and how can I get one?

A special ensign is a variation of the national flag that can be worn by certain yachts that belong to a privileged yacht club or organisation. To get one, you need to apply for a warrant from the Admiralty or the relevant authority and follow the rules and regulations of wearing it.

How big should my flags be and how should I hoist them?

The size of your flags depends on the length of your vessel, but as a general rule, your ensign should be about one inch for each foot of overall length. Your burgee and courtesy flag should be smaller than your ensign, but not too small to be seen. You should hoist your flags using halyards or staffs and make sure they are not tangled, faded, or torn.

When should I raise and lower my flags?

You should raise your flags at 0800 hours or when you leave harbour, whichever is later, and lower them at sunset or when you enter harbour, whichever is earlier. You should also lower your flags when out of sight of other vessels or when nobody is aboard.

Can I fly more than one burgee or other flags on my vessel?

Traditionally, you should only fly one burgee at a time, but some yachts may choose to fly more than one to show their affiliation with different clubs or associations. However, you should always make sure that your burgee matches your ensign if you are wearing a special one. You can also fly other flags, such as signal flags, house flags, or personal flags, but they should not take precedence over your ensign, burgee, or courtesy flag.

How should I salute other vessels or authorities with my flags?

You can salute other vessels or authorities by dipping your ensign, which means lowering it halfway down the staff or halyard and then hoisting it back up. You should only do this if you receive a salute first or if you are passing by a naval vessel, a Coast Guard vessel, or a foreign warship.

What are the rules for flying flags in a race?

The rules for flying flags in a race may vary depending on the organising authority, but generally, you should not fly your ensign during a race, as this signals that you are not racing. You should also follow any instructions given by the race committee regarding signal flags, class flags, or protest flags.

What are the consequences of not following flag etiquette?

Not following flag etiquette may result in fines, penalties, or even confiscation of your vessel if you break the law or offend the host country. It may also cause confusion, misunderstanding, or disrespect among other sailors or authorities. Therefore, it is advisable to learn and follow the proper flag etiquette whenever you go sailing.

I wrote this article using GPT-4, OpenAI’s large-scale language-generation model, as a research assistant to develop source material. I wrote the final draft in its entirety and believe it to be accurate to the best of my knowledge.

Dick McClary

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What Size Flag Do I Need for My Boat?

If you’re planning to hoist a flag on your boat, one of the most important considerations is the size of the flag. A flag that’s too small may not be visible from a distance, while a flag that’s too large can create problems with wind resistance and visibility. In this article, we’ll take a look at some factors you should consider when choosing the right size flag for your boat.

Distance and Visibility

The first thing to consider when selecting a boat flag size is the distance from which it will be viewed. For instance, if you’re sailing in an area with lots of other boats, you’ll need a larger flag that can be seen easily from a distance. On the other hand, if you’re just cruising in calm waters without much traffic around, you may not need as large of a flag.

Another factor to consider is how high up on your mast or antenna you plan to fly your flag. If your flag will be flying high up in the air, it will need to be larger than if it were flying closer to deck level.

The size of your boat is another important consideration when choosing a flag size. Larger boats typically require larger flags for optimal visibility. If you have a smaller boat, you may want to opt for a smaller flag that won’t overwhelm your vessel.

Flagpole Length

In addition to considering the size of your boat itself, you’ll also want to think about the length of your flagpole or mast. The length of your pole will determine how far away from the boat your flag will fly and therefore influence its visibility.

Flag Etiquette

When selecting a boat flag size, it’s also important to keep in mind proper etiquette and guidelines for displaying flags on boats. For example, in many countries and jurisdictions there are rules about the size and placement of flags on boats, so it’s important to check local regulations before selecting a flag.

7 Related Question Answers Found

What size winch do i need for my boat, what size boat oars do i need, what size prop should be on my boat, how big should my boat flag be, how many stands do i need for my boat, what size prop should i use on my boat, what is a good size boat to live on.

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Proper Display of the American Flag on Boats

Navigating flag protocols.

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Private Yachts

Commercial vessels, military ships, choosing the best boat flag.

  • Material - The material of the flag is crucial. Nylon flags are lightweight and excellent for areas with light to moderate wind. They dry quickly and are resistant to UV radiation. Polyester flags, on the other hand, are more durable and better for high-wind areas.
  • Size - The size of the flag should be proportional to the size of the boat. As a general rule, the length of the flag should be at least one inch for every foot of the overall length of the boat.
  • Durability - Durability is a must for any boat flag. Look for flags with reinforced stitching, ideally double or quadruple around the edges and the field of stars.

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  • Secure your boat flag pole in the appropriate holder at the stern of the boat, or at the main mast, depending on the vessel type and whether you are at anchor or underway.
  • Attach the top of the flag (the side with the stars) to the clip on the rope or pole that is highest.
  • Secure the bottom of the flag to the lower clip. Make sure the flag is not upside down or twisted.
  • Hoist the flag by pulling on the rope or raising the pole. The flag should fly freely without any obstructions.

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Incle ment weather, worn or damaged flags, understanding the consequences.

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flag size for sailboat

Boats & Flags: 11 Answers You Should Know (For Beginners)

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The flags on a boat can signify many different things.

Mostly, they can seem confusing to a layperson or a new boater.

Flying the wrong flag at the wrong position can confuse other boaters and result in a fine!

Here’s what you need to know about how and when you can use flags on a boat:

Table of Contents

flag size for sailboat

1. What Are The Main Types Of Flags Flown On Boats?

On any non-commercial vessel, you can usually find these four different types of flags:

  • Ensign – a variety of national flag
  • Burgee – a flag representing a boating organization
  • Private Signal – a small custom-made flag for the boat owner
  • Courtesy – the flag of a foreign country for an onboard guest or when you are in foreign waters

2. What is an Ensign Flag, and When Do I Use It?

An ensign is a flag from the nation from which the boater originates.

They are slightly different from their national flags. Ensign flags used to be restricted to documented vessels only.

Now it is common courtesy to fly the national flag on all types of recreational boats.

It is proper etiquette to only fly ensign flags from 0800 to sunset unless you’re in a boat race outside those hours. It is also important to take this flag down before leaving your boat if it is unmanned at sunset.

If you take your boat into international waters, you should fly your national flag. These days ensign flags are flown off of the stern.

If you do this, make sure it is on a staff-pole and that the pole is long and angled.

If you offset it to one side (like the starboard side), it’ll fly clear of the engine’s exhaust.

This will also keep it clear from the rigging.

3. What is a Burgee Flag, and When Do I use That?

A burgee flag is a small flag with the skipper’s sailing organization or yacht club on it.

It follows the skipper from boat to boat. These are flown day and night.

Traditionally, sailing vessels hoisted these flags on a “pigstick” at the top of the highest mast.  Because of instruments that are often at the top of the mast, it is more common to hoist a burgee on a spreader halyard. 

Of course, this is the modern way to fly it.

The starboard rigging is known as a place of honor (when it comes to flags). That’s why you fly the host country’s flag there when visiting a foreign port.

4. What is a Private Signal, and When Do we use Those?

These are small flags that are custom designed (and custom made) specifically for the boat owner.

It’s flown day and night but is only flown when the owner is in command of the boat.

If a different sailor is in command, they are to fly their own private signal.

Private signals are flown at the aftermost mast’s head (if you have a multi-mast boat). On a sloop, fly private signals on starboard rigging, below the burgee.

Unless you don’t have a burgee, then you can fly it alone.

5. What’s a Courtesy Flag, and When Do I Fly That?

Courtesy flags are flown when you are in a foreign nation’s waters.

It also comes into play when you have someone from a foreign country on your vessel.

You can only fly a courtesy flag if certain conditions are met:

  • Only after authorities from the country have granted you clearance.
  • After you remove your yellow “Q” flag.
  • If you have a flag that is in the proper condition.
  • If you fly a courtesy flag, do so at the boat’s starboard spreader.
  • If there is more than one mast, then it must be flown off the starboard spreader of the forward most mast.

By “proper condition,” you must fly a flag that is not old or in a disrespectful state.

If you do fly a ratty old flag, you could be fined for being disrespectful!

6. What About International Signal Flags?

There is a system of internationally recognized numerical and alphabetical pennants and flags known as the International Code of Signals.

This helps communicate when you’re out in the open water.

The messages these flags send can be about navigation or even safety.

Signals can be sent by:

  • Flag semaphore
  • Signal lamp (otherwise known as “blinkers”)
  • Radiotelephony
  • Radiotelegraphy

There are so many different communication methods because it is important when the crew’s safety is concerned—especially when you’re in open water.

Boaters use nautical signal flags in several different ways:

  • With each spelling out a letter of a message
  • With a flag symbolizing a specific message (For example, an “A flag” is flown by diving support vessels when they can’t move from their current location.)
  • In a yacht or dinghy race, with each flag flying as code (For example, a “P flag” is used to stand for “Prepare,” which indicates that the race is about to start.)

Some boaters use signal flags to dress their ships for holidays by hoisting the national ensign at the stern staff first.

A rainbow of flags can then be arranged, reaching from the waterline forward to the aft, from the bowsprit end (or stem).

7. Why are There so Many Boat Flags?

Flags are flown for multiple reasons but remember that when you’re out at sea, this is the easiest way to recognize other boats.

It’s like the license plate on a car. Different countries have different license plates.

Within each country, different states or provinces can also have different license plates.

Then, you can have symbols that signify clubs or organizations on your license plate in each state.

This is a way you can express yourself on your vessel.

Check out our article about what colored flags on houses are all about.

8. Why are Some Flags Flown at Half-Mast?

Just like on land, flags are sometimes flown at half-mast in respect for someone who has passed.

This isn’t required in all places, nor is it mandated by any law.

However, it’s good to note why you might see this when you are out in the water.

Some boaters will also dip their flags (drop it down to half, then raise it again) as a friendly signal to a passing boater.

9. What Size Are Boat Flags?

Generally, boat flags come in different sizes, depending on the type of boat that you have.

For aesthetic purposes, most flags are roughly 1” per foot of the length of your boat.

Also, the staff should be twice the length of the height of your flag.

For example, if you have a powerboat that is 33’ long, you should have flags that are 24” x 36” on a staff that is 48”.

This is the recommended proportion of ensign flags. Burgee and private signals are approximately half that size. For the same powerboat example above, you might get burgee and private signal flags, which are 12” x 18”.

10 What do “Fishing Flags” Mean?

Fishing flags are signal flags that have representations of various types of fish on them.

Flying one (or more, if you’re lucky) lets other boaters know what sort of fish you’ve caught that day. It also lets other boaters know what sort of fish are in the area that day.

Fishing flags should be placed on the port rigger, spaced at least one flag length apart. This will let the proper authorities or other boaters count your catch easily.

It should also be placed in order of size, with the biggest species of fish on top.

Certain rules follow certain types of fish so make sure you read up on the fish flag etiquette in fishing manuals.

In the past, if a fisherman tagged a fish, they would fly the species flag with a white “T” under it to let others know of their tag. If they hoisted the species flags upside down, that signifies that they had caught and released that particular fish.

If they did so with multiple fish of the same species, they hoisted several red triangle pennants under that species flag.

However, today most fishermen are doing the opposite when they practice catch and release. They fly a fish right-side-up to signify that it swam away healthy after being released.

While an upside-down species flag signifies a fish caught and harvested.

11. How Much do Boat Flags Cost?

Boating flags can range from $12 for a single flag to $175 for a set.

The average cost for an ensign flag is roughly $20.

Final Thoughts

There is a long history of nautical flag use.

Using the wrong flag or flying a flag in the wrong position can get you into trouble. Thus, it is important to brush up on the meanings of different flags before using them.

It is important to have a boat handling book or flag manual on your boat in case of emergency.  The US Power Squadron is a good source for their publication “ How to Fly Flags, Nautical Flags Display .”

If you are out with your family and an emergency occurs, they must know how to call and signal for help in different ways: including using a flag signal.

Flags aren’t just important for you and your boat, however.

It is also important to recognize what different flags may mean when you run across other boats.

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US Ensign Sizes

The flag at the stern of your boat is either a U.S. ensign, a yacht ensign, or a USPS ensign. A national ensign flown at the flagstaff should be one inch on the fly for each foot of overall length of the vessel. So a 30 foot vessel should fly a national ensign that has at least a 30 inch fly. All other flags on power boats should be 5/8 inch on the fly for each foot of overall length.

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Recommended Yacht Flag Sizes
 

 
 

Length of Boat
Under
Size of Private Signal & Club signal Size of Yacht Ensign
20 feet 8" x 12" 12" x 18"
20 feet 10" x 15" 12" x 18"
25 feet 10" x 15" 16" x 24"
30 feet 12" x 18" 16" x 24"
35 feet 12" x 18" 24" x 36"
40 feet 14" x 21" 24" x 36"
45 feet 14" x 21" 24" x 36"
50 feet 16" x 24" 2-1/2' x 4'
55 feet 16" x 24" 2-1/2' x 4'
60 feet 20" x 30" 2-1/2' x 4'
70 feet 20" x 30" 3' x 5'
80 feet 24" x 36" 3' x 5'
90 feet 24" x 36" 4' x 6'
100 feet 30" x 48" 4' x 6'

Length of Boat
Under
Size of Private Signal & Club signal Size of Yacht Ensign
20 feet 10" x 15" 16" x 24"
25 feet 10" x 15" 16" x 24"
30 feet 12" x 18" 24" x 36"
35 feet 14" x 21" 24" x 36"
40 feet 14" x 21" 24" x 36"
45 feet 16" x 24" 2-1/2' x 4'
50 feet 20" x 30" 2-1/2' x 4'
60 feet 20" x 30" 2-1/2' x 4'
70 feet 24" x 36" 3' x 5'
80feet 24" x 36" 3' x 5'
90 feet 30" x 48" 4' x 6'
100 feet 30" x 48" 4' x 6'

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Flag étiquette or rules on a US documented vessel

  • Thread starter NiceBeny
  • Start date May 29, 2016
  • Beneteau Owner Forums
  • Ask A Beneteau Owner

NiceBeny

I know the US flag needs to be flown in other countries correct? but what about in the US? and can other country flags be flown? where in the stern, port or starboard? thanks I just don't want a visit from my local coast guard if I can help it.  

woodster

fly the us flag on the starboard side on the stern......the length of your flag should be the length in inches as the length of your boat is in feet or the next size up  

Stu Jackson

Stu Jackson

OK, I'll violate my own rules and answer. Got this just the other day from Active Captain: >>> The Flag Advisor - 1 >>> Nearly every cruising boat on the water flies one or more flags. But get into a discussion about flag etiquette and rules, and no one can seem to agree on the full set of what's right and what's wrong. So we'll take it on over the summer. We'll research the generally accepted practices and bring a couple of topics into the discussion. Note that we're going to present the findings for recreational boats. Military, government, or special use boats might well have different sets of rules and accepted practices. For this first part, we'll discuss the rules surrounding national and courtesy flags, and flag sizes. Courtesy and national flags Rule 1. There are no real rules. There are customs and some flag etiquette rules that have been adapted for boats. However, when visiting another country, make sure there are no laws about flying courtesy flags because boaters have been known to receive fines. It is often an insult to fly a courtesy flag of another country incorrectly. 2. A vessel's national flag is flown from the stern. 3. If not prohibited, you can fly another location flag (state, province, territory) at the main masthead in place of any private, yacht club, or officer's flag. On a mastless boat, a state flag flies from either the bow or radio antenna. 4. Only the national flag should be at the stern. It is considered a place of honor for the vessel's national flag. Never put any other flag there. 5. Do not fly a courtesy flag (a small flag of the country you're visiting) until your vessel has been properly cleared by customs and immigration. Until clearance is complete, fly the yellow Q (quarantine) flag. 6. On a powerboat without a mast, the courtesy flag replaces any flag that is normally flown at the bow. 7. On a powerboat with a mast and spreaders, the courtesy flag is flown at the starboard spreader. On a powerboat with two-masts, the courtesy flag is flown from the starboard spreader of the forward mast. 8. On a sailboat, the courtesy flag is flown at the starboard spreader. On sailboats with more than one mast, the courtesy flag is flown from the starboard spreader of the forward mast. 9. Don't fly a foreign courtesy flag after you return to your home country. Flag sizing These are not well agreed upon. Chapman's suggests the following: 1. The national flag at the stern of your boat should be one inch long for every foot of overall vessel length rounded up to a normally available size. 2. Other flags (club burgees, private signals, courtesy flags) should be one-half inch long for every foot of overall vessel length. Another competing sizing suggests: 1. Boats up to 50 feet in length should use a 16 x 24 inch national flag and 12 x 18 inch courtesy flags. 2. For every 25 additional feet in length, increase the size by one standard size. Flags give your boat some identity and even add some beauty. We'll continue with some of the other accepted rules in future segments.  

my rule is always fly the SBO bergee  

Newport Bob

Slight disagreement; The US flag or the US yacht ensign is to be flown on the stern, on centerline. If not practical, then on stbd of CL as close to center as practical. Also, when in another country only the US flag, not ensign, is to be flown. Club bergee, owner flag my be flown from stbd spreader.  

taken from boat flag etiquette Boats today fly the ensign from the stern, which provides the best visibility, but it can also be flown from the leech of the most aftersail. When flown from the stern, it should be on a staff (pole) that is sufficiently long and angled, and that is offset to one side (traditionally the starboard side), so the flag flies clear of engine exhaust and rigging.  

Kermit

NiceBeny said: I know the US flag needs to be flown in other countries correct? but what about in the US? and can other country flags be flown? Click to expand

When you visit foreign water, your boat should display a courtesy flag ( the civil ensign of the country you are visiting ) whenever your U.S. national ensign (the USPS ensign or the yacht ensign should not be displayed in foreign waters) is displayed. (The USPS ensign and U.S. yacht ensign should not be worn in foreign waters) If your vessel is mastless, it should wear this "courtesy flag" at the bow, in lieu of a squadron or club burgee, or on a starboard antenna strong enough to support it. It your vessel has one or more masts, display it single-hoisted at the outboard signal halyard of the main starboard spreader. Move any flag normally flown there to the inboard starboard halyard or, if your boat has only one halyard per side, to the port spreader halyard. The customs observed in various foreign waters differ from one another. Try to learn the correct procedure for the country you are entering. For example, is some countries it is customary to fly the courtesy flag only after the quarantine flag (the yellow 'Q' flag) and the vessel has been granted pratique by the appropriate authorities. Do not fly a foreign courtesy flag after you have returned to U.S. waters. It is not to be used as a badge of accomplishment for having cruised to another country.  

Woodster, Sorry to disagree - you made me google -- but, per USPS and Chapman's --only offset if required. OK, but not first/preferred position. (I originally checked/confirmed this when I purchased my Beneteau - the welded to stern rail flag mast socket is on the port side) http://www.usps.org/f_stuff/etiquett.html http://www.annin.com/commercial/marine_flag_etiquette.asp A related bit of info in the links is relative to flying multiple YC burgees.  

Newport Bob said: (I originally checked/confirmed this when I purchased my Beneteau - the welded to stern rail flag mast socket is on the port side) Click to expand
Newport Bob said: Woodster, Sorry to disagree Click to expand
Newport Bob said: per USPS and Chapman's --only offset if required. OK, but not first/preferred position Click to expand

Again, USCG, CG Aux, Chapman, NYYC, etc together developed the updated code I referenced. Not iron clad, but a combined effort to standardize. Don't know your source but "preferred" is CL not stbd side. Outboard or exhaust makes it inappropriate THEN offset to stbd. My exhaust is not on CL, actually on stbd side of boat, not on stern. But my flag is to stbd, because I have an open center boarding platform.  

Newport Bob said: But my flag is to stbd, because I have an open center boarding platform. Click to expand
woodster said: exactly my point ...i have a center boarding ladder and my flag is to the starboard also ....i really don't care where one flies the flag as long as they fly it with pride Click to expand

Ron20324

"They're not RULES, they're more like guidlines."  

No argument - not rules with penalties. Even the US Code uses the word should in most paragraphs and states the following. "The following codification of existing rules and customs pertaining to the display and use of the flag of the United States of America is established for the use of such civilians or civilian groups or organizations as may not be required to conform with regulations promulgated by one or more executive departments of the Government of the United States." The Flag Code established by USPS and USSCG does the same, it formalizes and unifies the traditional ways in which we give respect to the flag.  

Ron20324 said: "They're not RULES, they're more like guidlines." Click to expand

thank you all for your replies, I think I got it now.  

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‘We are proud to be Americans’: Store owner concerned after someone flips his American flag

NASHVILLE, Tenn. ( WSMV /Gray News) - A jewelry store owner in Tennessee says he is working to protect his roof after someone climbed up over the weekend and flipped his American flag.

Peacock Jewelers owner Paul Wilson said people have climbed up to his roof before to cause damage, but this past weekend was a first.

He said a man was caught on one of his security cameras shimmying up the side of the building and then flipping the large American flag he has on his roof upside down.

“We’re very concerned,” Wilson said. “We want to show the public that we are proud to be Americans. Proud of our military, our police, all the people who risk their lives to protect us.”

Wilson has decorated the store with flags and other red, white and blue banners to honor his family members who have served in the military. He never thought someone would mess with the flag waving on the roof.

“We did not intend (to display) a distress signal,” Wilson said. “We just intended to patriotically display our flag, and someone got up there and turned it over. We didn’t even realize it had happened.”

An upside-down flag has historically represented a distress signal. However, it’s also become a symbol used by some supporters of former President Donald Trump in their “Stop the Steal” movement.

Wilson said this is worse than in the past when people have gone on the roof and stolen their flags, damaged air conditioning units and spray-painted graffiti.

He is hoping no one was offended by the flag and wants the community to know they fixed the issue as soon as they noticed it.

Wilson said they are working with their security company and Metro Nashville police who patrol the area to figure out how to keep this from happening again.

Copyright 2024 WSMV via Gray Media Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Florida beaches open after shark attacks injure woman, 2 teens. What we know

Two teenagers and a woman were injured in two shark attacks less than two hours apart Friday afternoon in the Florida Panhandle. The woman lost her lower left arm and suffered "significant trauma" to other areas of her body, officials said at a Friday afternoon news conference. The mother of one of the teens said the girl's hand had been taken and her right leg had to be amputated .

Both incidents happened between Miramar Beach and Panama City Beach on the Gulf of Mexico.

Beaches in Walton and Bay counties were closed Friday and reopened Saturday morning , with warnings. The Walton County Sheriff's Office and Florida Fish and Wildlife monitored the shoreline by boat through the weekend. Panama City Beach Police in the Sheriff's Office helicopter Saturday reported seeing " a notable presence of sharks , specifically bull sharks," near the first incident.

"We want to reiterate that sharks are always present in the Gulf ," the WCSO said in a Facebook post . "Swimmers and beachgoers should be cautious when swimming and be aware of their surroundings at all times."

What happened in the shark attacks in Walton County, Florida?

At about 1:20 p.m. Friday, a 45-year-old woman was swimming with her husband past the first sandbar near Founders Lane in Watersound Beach, west of Seacrest Beach when she was bitten.

"She received significant trauma to the midsection and pelvic area," said South Walton Fire District Fire Chief Ryan Crawford at a press conference Friday , "as well as amputation of the left lower arm."

About an hour and a half later, just before 3 p.m., two girls aged 15 and 17 were swimming with friends and looking for sand dollars in waist-deep water near the Sandy Shores Court area of Seacrest Beach, about four miles east of the first bite. The girls were swimming just inside the first sandbar, Crawford said, in a similar proximity to the shoreline as the previous attack.

"Victim one received significant injuries to one upper and one lower extremity," Crawford said. "Victim number two received what's been described as flesh wounds to the right lower extremity."

How are the Florida shark attack victims? What are their conditions?

A teenager, Lulu Gribbin of Alabama, was treated on the scene by first responders and taken via helicopter to HCA Fort Walton-Destin Hospital. She is in critical condition with severe injuries, including the loss of her lower left arm.

The girl's mother, Ann Blair Gribbon, said on a platform for hospital patients that the teen's left hand was bitten off and a leg had to be amputated. She'll likely need at least five more surgeries to finalize the amputations, Gribbon said, but the girl's vitals were improving by Saturday and hospital staff was able to remove her breathing tube.

"This was a first big step," Ann Gribbin wrote. "Once she was settled her first words to us were 'I made it.'

The 45-year-old woman lost a hand to the shark bite and suffered trauma to her midsection and pelvic region, officials said. She was in critical condition Friday.

Several beachgoers had medical training, Walton County Sheriff Michael Adkinson, and at least two were nurses. "Those folks jumped in and started rendering care and help," he said, as the deputy and South Walton crew arrived.

Adkinson said he and Crawford decided to close the beaches for a couple of miles around the first attack. But before that was put into place, the second one occurred.

The other girl was taken to Ascension Bay Medical Center in Panama City Beach. She was in stable condition with flesh wounds to her lower right extremity.

Why did a shark or sharks bite people swimming in Walton County?

The precise cause is unknown. Most of the time when a shark bites a human being , it's because it was curious about the splashing in the water or startled by a swimmer or surfer crossing its path. Some sharks may bite to protect an area, similar to a dog barking at people in his yard. Shark bites, while potentially horrific, remain rare .

Panama City Beach police reported seeing a number of bull sharks near the sandbar by the first incident. Bay County Sheriff Tommy Ford said in a release that, according to the FWC, "bait fish are schooling near the shore at this time of year, which may have been a contributing factor in the attacks." 

Destin charter boat Capt. Gary Jarvis told The Northwest Florida Daily News that there are more sharks in the Gulf of Mexico than there have been for years.

“There are more people that swim in the water than before and there are more sharks in the water than ever before. So, the incident rate of shark bites is only going to go in one direction,” Jarvis said. 

Where did the Florida shark attacks happen? Where is Watersound Beach?

Watersound Beach is a community along the coast of South Walton between Seacrest Beach and Seagrove Beach.

Where is Seacrest Beach, Florida?

Seacrest Beach is farther to the east along Highway 30-A.

Are beaches open today in Walton County, Florida, after shark attacks?

Beaches were reopened Saturday morning with single red and purple flags flying, indicating hazardous water conditions and possible dangerous marine life are present.

As of Monday morning , yellow flags are flying in Walton County, indicating moderate surf and/or currents.

Are beaches open today in Bay County, Florida?

Neighboring Bay County also closed its beaches Friday and reopened them Saturday morning with single red and purple flags flying.

As of Monday morning , Panama City Beach continues to fly these flags indicating high hazard surf conditions and dangerous marine life, which means swimming is allowed but you swim at your own risk and should use extreme caution.

How many shark attacks have there been in Florida this year?

According to  trackingsharks.com , the incidents in Walton County are the first three shark-related incidents in Florida in 2024. There are usually around 100 bites reported worldwide per year, the site said.

How many shark bites were there worldwide in 2023?

The Florida Museum of Natural History’s  International Shark Attack File  investigated 120 alleged shark-human interactions worldwide in 2023.  Sixty-nine were confirmed as unprovoked shark bites  on humans and 22 were found to be provoked bites.

Breakdown of 2023 reports around the world:

  • Unprovoked bites: 69
  • Provoked bites: 22
  • Boat bites: 9
  • Scavenge: 2 (post-mortem bites)
  • Public Aquaria: 1
  • No assignment could be made: 1
  • Not confirmed: 16

Florida remains shark bite capital of the US

Florida continues to be the No. 1 location for the number of shark bites.

There were 16 bites — although none were fatal — confirmed in 2023. That's lower than Florida's historic average of 19 incidents a year.

  • Florida:  16 bites, none fatal
  • Hawaii:  8 bites, 1 fatal
  • New York:  4 bites, none fatal
  • California:  2 bites, 1 fatal
  • North Carolina:  3 bites, none fatal
  • South Carolina:  2 bites, none fatal
  • New Jersey:  1 bite, none fatal

Top 10: Confirmed unprovoked shark attacks in Florida from 1882 to present

  • Volusia County: 351
  • Brevard County: 158
  • Palm Beach County: 83
  • St. Johns County: 45
  • Duval County: 46
  • Martin County: 41
  • St. Lucie County: 39
  • Indian River County: 22
  • Monroe County: 21
  • Miami-Dade County: 20

How do I avoid shark bites?

  • Swim with a buddy. Most sharks are more likely to approach a solitary person.
  • Stay close to shore.
  • Be careful around the area between sandbars or near steep dropoffs, both popular shark hangouts.
  • Stay out of the water at dawn or dusk when sharks are more active and feeding.
  • Avoid shiny jewelry or reflective swimwear that might resemble the sheen of fish scales.
  • Avoid areas where people are fishing or areas with known effluents or sewage. Stay away from areas with diving seabirds.
  • Be careful in murky water. Some shark species may not see you very well either, and there can be confusion.
  • Try not to splash too much, especially in a single spot. Sharks may investigate to see if you are a fish in distress.
  • If a shark is spotted, slowly and calmly get out of the water.
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Six Flags Great America to debut new 'Sky Striker' ride

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GURNEE, Ill. (WLS) -- Six Flags Great America Thursday is unveiling is newest ride, the Sky Striker, which the park says is the Midwest's tallest pendulum ride.

Sky Striker stands 17 stories tall and the swinging disk reaches speeds of up to 75 miles-per-hour as it glides back and forth.

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"Sky Striker is set to redefine the thrill experience at Six Flags Great America," said Park President, John Krajnak. "As a major thrill attraction, it is the perfect complement to the record-breaking lineup of roller coasters that our guests look forward to season after season."

The park says the ride creates, "intense feeling of weightlessness" while 172 feet up in the air.

The park says Sky Striker will be open to the public soon. For more information, visit sixflags.com/greatamerica .

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Salute to Old Glory: Mayor hosts Flag Day ceremony in Newport Beach

Numerous dignitaries with a multiple U.S. flags.

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In recognition of Flag Day and the 249th birthday of the United States Army, Newport Beach Mayor Will O’Neill hosted a community commemoration ceremony Friday featuring an installation of 249 flags filling the grassy area of the Civic Center.

As part of a Flag Day celebration, 249 flags were installed.

The ceremony included a presentation of colors by the American Legion Post 291 Color Guard and Sea Scout Troop 711, the national anthem sung by Keira Wilkes and a poem recited by Gianna D’ Egidio.

O’Neill shared some history about Flag Day, noting that the Army came into being “before we became a country.”

Army combat veteran Evin Planto talks about the flag Friday at Newport Beach Civic Center Flag Day event.

Assemblywoman Diane Dixon, whose father had served in the Army and received a Purple Heart, also spoke at the event. She thanked O’Neill for the idea to hold a Flag Day celebration, “recognizing how important the flag is to our liberty.”

State Sen. Janet Nguyen, who also came from a military family, shared her experience of losing family members during the Vietnam War. “Only in America would an immigrant be allowed like myself to live a life of democracy and independence here,” she said. “Today we remember what the red, white and blue means. We live in the greatest country in the world.”

Danielle Rivas photographs Michelle Peschel on Friday.

Thirty-year combat Army veteran Evin Planto said, “I’m honored to stand before you. The flag holds significance for liberty, justice and democracy and Old Glory is a symbol of our nation’s greatness.”

Keira Wilkes sings the national anthem alongside the American Legion Post 291 color guard Friday.

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San Diego Union-Tribune

Photos: The San Diego Wooden Boat Festival

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flag size for sailboat

The San Diego Wooden Boat Festival  is a chance for the general public to see and board beautiful wooden boats of all sizes, both vintage and new, with the proceeds benefiting the local Sea Scouts.

Pierre-Marie Quincy, owner of the Astra, a 38-foot sailboat, uses a wench to hoist up Emily Armstrong, 7, seated in a climbing chair, while onboard the Astra during the Annual San Diego Wooden Boat Festival, held every year on Father's Day weekend, at the Koehler Kraft boat yard at Shelter Island in San Diego on Sunday, June 16, 2024. The festival is a chance for the general public to see and board beautiful wooden boats of all sizes, both vintage and new, with the proceeds benefiting the local Sea Scouts. (Hayne Palmour IV / For The San Diego Union-Tribune)

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Payne Stewart honored with memorial flag Sunday on Pinehurst’s 18th green

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Four months later, Stewart tragically died in a plane crash, but his legacy echoes across these grounds in the Carolina Sandhills, now and forever – especially on U.S. Open Sunday.

The USGA is honoring Stewart and his legacy with a commemorative flag on the par-4 18th hole for Sunday’s final round at Pinehurst No. 2. The flag is inscribed with a silhouette of Stewart’s winning moment a quarter-century ago, a celebration that was dually exuberant and classy. The moment neatly matched Stewart’s ethos and hence punctuated his achievement so perfectly.

Payne Stewart celebrates victory after sinking his final putt during the last day of the 1999 U.S. Open played on the number two course at Pinehurst in North Carolina, USA. (Tom Able-Green/Getty Images)

Payne Stewart celebrates victory after sinking his final putt during the last day of the 1999 U.S. Open played on the number two course at Pinehurst in North Carolina, USA. (Tom Able-Green/Getty Images)

Sunday’s hole location is also set in the same back-right position (26 paces on, six paces from the right edge) used in 1999. Stewart’s dramatic victory at the 1999 U.S. Open at Pinehurst was his third major title, adding to the 1989 PGA Championship at Kemper Lakes and 1991 U.S. Open at Hazeltine. It furthered his legacy as one of golf’s great characters, his talent and evolving patience complemented by a distinctive style. He was also part of the Ryder Cup’s winning U.S. Team later in 1999, a month before his tragic passing.

Stewart was positioned for continued success at the game’s highest level, and although that time was cut short, his impact endures into golf’s next generation.

Payne Stewart’s legacy lives on at Pinehurst

“There are certain people that we all have in our lives that just make you feel better when you're around them,” said Stewart’s son Aaron Stewart. “And he was certainly one of those people. He could brighten up a room just by walking into it.

“When they see that pose, you can see just how much it meant to him, right? There was nothing that got him more fired up than playing in his country's open.”

A view of the statue of Payne Stewart at Pinehurst Resort and Country Club in Pinehurst, North Carolina. (Streeter Lecka/Getty Images)

A view of the statue of Payne Stewart at Pinehurst Resort and Country Club in Pinehurst, North Carolina. (Streeter Lecka/Getty Images)

Perhaps this U.S. Open will come down to the 72nd hole, and perhaps a contender will face a Stewart-type putt to join the Missourian as a major winner at Pinehurst. It would only be fitting.

Kevin Prise is an associate editor for the PGA TOUR. He is on a lifelong quest to break 80 on a course that exceeds 6,000 yards and to see the Buffalo Bills win a Super Bowl. Follow Kevin Prise on Twitter .

IMAGES

  1. The Definitive Guide To Boat Flag Shapes and Sizes

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  2. A Guide to Nautical Flags & Code Signals

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  3. Sail Flags

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  4. What Is It About Boating...?: Flag Placement Basics for Recreational

    flag size for sailboat

  5. The Nautical Flags in one infographic #sailing #flags #meaning #learn

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  6. Guide to boat flag sizing according to mast height and boat length

    flag size for sailboat

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COMMENTS

  1. How to Select and Display Boat Flags

    Everyday Flag Etiquette. All boats operating in inland waters can fly the U.S. "Old Glory" 50-star flag, or the U.S. Yacht Ensign, the 13-star "Betsy Ross" flag with the fouled anchor. Flags are flown, traditionally from 8:00 a.m. to sunset, from the stern staff (when under way or occupied), or onboard sailboats —on aftermost sail 2/3 ...

  2. Guide to Boat Flag Sizing

    All other flags on board should be smaller in size. Generally speaking, the yacht ensign should be approximately one inch in width for every foot of boat length. For example, a 33-foot vessel would use a 24x36" yacht ensign with a private boat flag of 12x18".

  3. The Definitive Guide To Boat Flag Shapes and Sizes

    Answer: They can be almost any size, we offer flags in 12" by 18" and 3' by 5'. Question: Are nautical flags square or rectangle? Answer: Boat flags come in a variety of shapes and sizes, but the most common boat flag shape is rectangular. Rectangular boat flags are typically used for decorative purposes.

  4. Flag Size Guide

    Generally, yachts up to about 60 feet (18 metres) in length look properly "dressed" with half yard (18" x 12" or 45x30cm) courtesy flags. There is a smaller size range (12"x8") not available from Jimmy Green because these flags look insignificant from deck level when hoisted aloft. There is an old rule of thumb for courtesy flags: a half inch ...

  5. Flag Sizes for Boats

    3' x 5'. 90 ft. 30" x 48". 4' x 6'. 100 ft. 30" x 48". 4' x 6'. This page displays a nautical flag size chart for how big your flags should be per length of boat. View this flag sizes for boats chart at All Star Flags!

  6. What flags to fly and where to put them on your boat

    Boat owner's flag. The yacht owner can also fly their own national flag on the boat. It can be placed on the starboard spreader, but if the owner deems it appropriate it can be flown on the port side, as it is a flag of lower importance (than the ensign). The spreader is a mast reinforcement (between the mast and the shroud).

  7. PDF BOAT FLAG SIZES

    BOAT FLAG SIZES TO Power Boat Boat Length Under 20' 20' 25' 30' 35' 40' 45' 50' 55' 60' 70' 80' 90' 100' Private Ensign / Club Signal 8x12" 10x15" 10x15" 12x18" 12x18" 14x21" 14x21" 16x24" 16x24" 20x30" ... / Country Flag 16x24" 16x24" 24x36" 24x36" 24x36" 2.5x4' 2.5x4' 2.5x4' 3x5' 3x5' 4x6' 4x6' Title: boat-flag-size-guide Created Date:

  8. Boat Flags & Boat Flag Etiquette

    When ordering an ensign, or American Boat Flag, we recommend a flag that measures one inch for each foot of boat length. For smaller vessels, a 12x18" flag is usually suffice, while larger boats may opt for the 2x3' flag. Burgee and personal Custom Boat Flags are generally smaller than the ensign, but can measure up to half an inch for each ...

  9. Boat flag etiquette

    The size of a nautical flag is determined by the size of the boat that flies it. Flags are more often too small than too large. So in the rules below, round upward to the nearestlarger standard size. The flag at the stern of your boat: U.S. ensign or national flag should be about one inch for each foot of overall length. For example, on a 40ft ...

  10. Flag Etiquette on a sailing boat today

    Flags are more often too small than too large. So in the rules below, round upward to the nearestlarger standard size. The flag at the stern of your boat: The ensign or national flag should be about one inch for each foot of overall length. For example, on a 40ft. boat, the ensign should be 40 in. i.e. about 3.5ft.

  11. Flag Size Guideline

    Use a 30" x 48" Flag. For Sailboat Length* Up to 30' Use a 10" x 15" Flag. 31' to 36' Use a 12" x 18" Flag. 37' to 48' Use a 16" x 24" Flag. 49' to 60' Use a 20" x 30" Flag. 61' to 72' ... Use a 4' x 6' Flag *Flagstuff may not carry all flag sizes **For Powerboat and Sailboat .

  12. Sailboat Flag Etiquette

    The types of flags that you can fly on your boat; The sizes and positions of the flags; The occasions and situations when you should fly certain flags; The common mistakes and pitfalls to avoid when flying flags. The skipper of the Bowman 57 staysail ketch shown here is correctly flying a burgee ...

  13. What Size Flag Do I Need for My Boat?

    Distance and Visibility. The first thing to consider when selecting a boat flag size is the distance from which it will be viewed. For instance, if you're sailing in an area with lots of other boats, you'll need a larger flag that can be seen easily from a distance. On the other hand, if you're just cruising in calm waters without much ...

  14. American Flag Sizes: Common Dimensions

    20 feet to 29 feet - a 10"x15" flag is a good size for a boat of this length; 30 feet to 39 feet - Choose a 12"x18" flag for this boat; 40 feet to 49 feet - 14"x21" flag; 50 feet to 59 feet - 16"x24" flag; 60 feet to 69 feet - 20"x30" flag; There are more dimensions available online for those boats that are 70 feet all the way up to 100 feet.

  15. Displaying the American Flag on Boats

    Displaying the American flag for boat voyages is a respected tradition steeped in history and patriotic pride. Representing a nation's values, unity, and freedom, the American flag has always been an emblem of pride, serving as a beacon of courage for many. For mariners, the flag is not only a symbol of nationality but.

  16. Boats & Flags: 11 Answers You Should Know (For Beginners)

    Generally, boat flags come in different sizes, depending on the type of boat that you have. For aesthetic purposes, most flags are roughly 1" per foot of the length of your boat. Also, the staff should be twice the length of the height of your flag. For example, if you have a powerboat that is 33' long, you should have flags that are 24 ...

  17. US Ensign Flag Size Chart

    So a 30 foot vessel should fly a national ensign that has at least a 30 inch fly. All other flags on power boats should be 5/8 inch on the fly for each foot of overall length. Powerboat or. Sailboat Length. US Ensign Size. up to 20'. 12x18" flag. 21' to 24'. 16x24" flag.

  18. U.S. Flag Size

    As a calculation almost every flag size is a multiple of those two sizes in this case: 6x10, or 4x6 etc.. There are one or two odd sizes, and some are manufactured to rare custom sizes. An inch per foot of boat is an the most generally accepted rule but you can see the difficulty here; those with boats in the 30-40ft range have no choice but to ...

  19. Nautical Flag Size Chart

    Recommended Yacht Flag Sizes . POWERBOAT. Length of Boat Under: Size of Private Signal & Club signal: Size of Yacht Ensign: 20 feet: 8" x 12" 12" x 18" 20 feet: 10" x 15" 12" x 18" 25 feet ... SAILBOAT. Length of Boat Under: Size of Private Signal & Club signal: Size of Yacht Ensign: 20 feet: 10" x 15" 16" x 24" 25 feet: 10" x 15" 16" x 24" 30 ...

  20. Flag Sizing Chart for Boats

    Download Our FREE Boat Flag Size Chart . Get the Pefect Size Burgee or Flag for your Boat. Fill out the form on the right to download a FREE PDF of our boat flag sizing chart. Regardless of the size of your boat make sure that you have the appropriately sized flag or burgee on the water this year. A great resource to keep with you on your boat ...

  21. Courtesy flag size?

    RYA guidelines for flag sizes are: Ensign The general guideline for the size of Ensign used to be an inch per foot of yacht, but on many modern yachts this is found to be a little on the small side for the vessel to look "well dressed". Roughly speaking a 3/4 yard Ensign should look right on a boat of 21-26 ft, 1 yard for 27- 34 ft, 1 1/4 yard for 35 - 42 ft, 1 1/2 yard for 43 - 50 ft and 1 3/ ...

  22. American Flag etiquette

    The size of the flag flown on your boat also has no rules along with where you fly your "colors." When we had sailboats with gaff rigged mains, we flew the flag from the gaff because it was up and out of the way as well as where another boat could see it. But there was never a rule that said we had to fly it off our back stays at three quarters ...

  23. Flag étiquette or rules on a US documented vessel

    2. A vessel's national flag is flown from the stern. 3. If not prohibited, you can fly another location flag (state, province, territory) at the main masthead in place of any private, yacht club, or. officer's flag. On a mastless boat, a state flag flies from either the bow. or radio antenna. 4.

  24. 'We are proud to be Americans': Store owner concerned after someone

    Wilson has decorated the store with flags and other red, white and blue banners to honor his family members who have served in the military. He never thought someone would mess with the flag ...

  25. Florida shark attacks: Beaches open after bites injure woman, teens

    About an hour and a half later, just before 3 p.m., two girls aged 15 and 17 were swimming with friends and looking for sand dollars in waist-deep water near the Sandy Shores Court area of ...

  26. Six Flags Great America to debut new 'Sky Striker' ride

    GURNEE, Ill. (WLS) -- Six Flags Great America Thursday is unveiling is newest ride, the Sky Striker, which the park says is the Midwest's tallest pendulum ride. Sky Striker stands 17 stories tall ...

  27. Salute to Old Glory: Mayor hosts Flag Day ceremony in Newport Beach

    The grassy area at Newport Beach Civic Center was dotted with U.S. flags Friday for a special ceremony honoring not only the nation's Flag Day but the birthday of the U.S. Army.

  28. Photos: The San Diego Wooden Boat Festival

    The San Diego Wooden Boat Festival is a chance for the general public to see and board beautiful wooden boats of all sizes, both vintage and new, with the proceeds benefiting the local Sea Scouts.

  29. Payne Stewart honored with memorial flag Sunday on Pinehurst's 18th

    Change Text Size Written by Kevin Prise @PGATOURKevin PINEHURST, N.C. - Twenty-five years ago, Payne Stewart left an indelible mark on the U.S. Open with an 18-foot birdie on the 72nd hole to ...