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The words sustainable, low-impact, eco, and community involvement have become buzz-phrases in the tourism industry. They conjure up images of sophisticated, adventure-minded travelers jetting off to far flung corners of the world to kayak or surf or trek—but we believe that sustainable, community-oriented, ethical business begins at home. Our home is Montauk, New York.

The Montauk Catamaran Company’s sailing catamarans are the James Wharram designed Pahi 63 S/V Mon Tiki Largo , the Tiki 38 S/V Mon Tiki  and the Tiki 26 Mon Tiki Mini . All three of our boats were built right here on Long Island from the keel up, by local craftsmen, using low-impact construction methods.

Because safety is our first concern, our boats were constructed in accordance with the Code of Federal Regulations (CFRs) under US Coast Guard supervision, and to their exacting Inspected Passenger Vessel standards. Every phase of construction, from initial design, to hull construction, to rigging and deck layout have undergone rigorous US Coast Guard review and certification. Only USCG Inspected Passenger Vessels are permitted by law to carry more than six passengers, and the S/V Mon Tiki Largo and  S/V  Mon Tiki  are the only sailing vessels in Montauk that meet this exacting standard for design and safety.

Our boats are also low-emissions vessels. Primary propulsion is provided by a powerful sail plan, and sail we do! Auxiliary propulsion is provided by ultra-clean, ultra-quiet Honda engines, but under normal operation these engines are used for harbor maneuvers only. Once at sea, our boats are true sailing vessels. During your time aboard, the sounds you’ll hear are the sounds of wind and water.

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James Wharram: life and legacy of the iconic designer

Yachting World

  • January 29, 2024

Julien Girardot meets Hanneke Boon in Cornwall to discover the legend and legacy of pioneering catamaran designer James Wharram

pahi 63 catamaran

Falmouth, Cornwall, 1955: a legend is born along Customs House Quay. A smartly dressed young man with wild, curly hair has launched a 23ft catamaran, built in just a few months for the modest sum of £200 (the equivalent of around £6,500 today).

Rigged as a ketch with battened junk sails, the aptly named Tangaroa (meaning ‘God of the Sea’ in Polynesian) marked the beginning of the epic Wharram story.

At the time, catamarans were considered dangerous and eccentric, while yachting was a pastime largely reserved for high society. But sailing already has other visionaries. On the deck of Tangaroa, beside James, are two young women: Jutta Schulze-Rhonhof and Ruth Merseburger. In puritanical post-war England, setting off to cross the Atlantic with two young women – and German ones at that – was downright shocking! But these three young people care not a jot about conventional thinking. They dream of adventure and their enterprise is an act of defiance.

For years James Wharram has nurtured a passion for the history of sailing pioneers and the ethnic origins of the multihull. Devouring every book on the subject he could lay his hands on, he discovered the story of Joshua Slocum, the first solo circumnavigator (1895-1898), and the voyage of Kaimiloa by the Frenchman Eric de Bisschop. The tale, published in English in 1940, of de Bisschop’s attempt to prove the seaworthiness of double canoes by making a voyage from Hawaii to France on a catamaran he had built on the beach, became Wharram’s primary source of inspiration.

pahi 63 catamaran

Riding out the storm: James Wharram at the helm of Tangaroa in Biscay in 1955. Photo: Julien Girardot

Wharram disagreed with many assumptions of the time, and his first Atlantic crossing was an opportunity to refute Thor Heyerdahl’s theory on the settlement of the Pacific islands. Wharram contested the assertion of the Danish anthropologist who, after his voyage aboard the Kon-Tiki in 1947, affirmed that the boats used were simple rafts. Wharram was convinced that the boats were more akin to double canoes with sails, capable of going upwind and holding a course. These early multihulls, consisting of two hollowed-out tree trunks, were connected by crossbeams bound together with plant fibre. The sails were probably made from what is known as ‘tapa’ in Polynesia, hammered tree bark, which was also used to make clothes.

The three young adventurers left Falmouth on 27 September 1955 on a boat loaded with books, basic foods, and very little else. Despite a fraught passage, encountering storms in the Bay of Biscay and being suspected of being spies by Franco’s Guardia Civil, the trio successfully crossed the Atlantic and reached the island of Trinidad on 2 February 1957.

Without a penny to their name, they adopted a simple island life, and Jutta gave birth to her and James’ first child, Hannes. The unconventional polyamorous family lived aboard a raft inspired by the floating dwellings of the Pacific, nicknamed ‘the paradise island of the South Seas’. Tangaroa, now tired, was abandoned, as Wharram decided to build a new catamaran. By chance, two solo sailors came to anchor in the bay where the Wharram tribe lived afloat, and the legendary Bernard Moitessier and Henry Wakelam helped Wharram build his new design, Rongo.

pahi 63 catamaran

Wharram, Merseburger and Schulze-Rhonhof aboard Tangaroa in Falmouth, 1955, before their Atlantic crossing. Photo: Julien Girardot

Thanks to the experience of his first transatlantic voyage, as well as knowledge gathered from Wharram’s endless reading, Rongo was much more accomplished. While Tangaroa was flat-bottomed, Rongo has V-hulls. To prove the design’s seaworthy qualities, Wharram decided to tackle the North Atlantic, sailing from west to east with his two companions. This route was known to strike fear into the hearts of multihull sailors of the time, as the two previous attempts had tragically ended in two deaths.

The crew left La Martinique for New York on 16 April 1959, one year after Rongo’s construction began. The return voyage to Conwy in Wales took 50 days, but the gamble paid off, and Wharram’s new design was the first to achieve what many thought impossible. The curly-haired eccentric became something of a celebrity, and following his great Atlantic adventure, James published his first book, Two girls, Two Catamarans. The years that followed were Wharram’s golden age, with plans released to suit every budget and every dream. Soon there were Wharram designs all over the world, connected by a powerful community spirit.

Drawing a Wharram

My own journey to this remote corner of Cornwall began decades before. After 15 years of travelling the world, inventing and reinventing my life, including many years living in the Pacific islands, I felt the need to capture these experiences by creating the boat of my dreams.

pahi 63 catamaran

Illustrations inspired by a visit to the Wharram design office in Cornwall. Image: Benjamin Flao

While living in Tuamotu, I was involved in several incredible projects to build traditional sailing canoes under the directive of talented local Tahitian boatbuilder, Alexandre Genton (now chief of operations at Blue Composite shipyard in Tahiti). At first we launched small single-seat sailing canoes with two outrigger floats. These are the simplest way to sail: a sheet in one hand, a paddle in the other, which you plunge over the side of the canoe into the water, and it makes a perfect rudder. Then we built a larger version, Va’a Motu, for a hotel in Bora Bora, of splendid stripped kauri planking. Finally, we worked with the local population to build an ambitious 30ft Va’a Motu with a single ama, on the atoll of Fakarava in the Tuamotu archipelago.

Curiously, after many experimental trials at building and sailing canoes, my imagined ideal yacht turned out to be something very close to a Wharram design, which I learned as soon as I shared my first cautious sketches with friends. I realised I had to meet James Wharram.

In October 2021, I dialled the number of JW Designs. A woman answered; James’ long-term life and business partner Hanneke Boon. I tell her my ideas to build from one of their plans: the Islander 39. We began an email exchange and when I asked her what James thought of this model, in November 2021, less than a month before he died, she replied: “James is enthusiastic about your project. He’s now 93 years old and nearing the end of his life.

pahi 63 catamaran

The Pahi 63 Spirit of Gaia which Wharram and Boon sailed around the world. Image: Benjamin Flao

“He has been looking at the Islander 39 design for several years and often says, ‘I wish I had one myself.’ It’s the only Wharram design that has never been built, so your project is a wish come true for him.”

On 14 December 2021, James Wharram passed away. Out of respect for the bereavement, and due to Covid-related travel restrictions, we decided to postpone our meeting. Some months later on a beautiful spring afternoon, I landed in Plymouth with my friend and artist Benjamin Flao, himself the owner of a Wharram-designed Tiki 28, and headed for Devoran near Truro in Cornwall, the stronghold of the Wharram family.

Hanneke welcomes us into her office. It is a beautiful wooden cabin, warm and bright, overlooking the changing lights of Cornwall. The place looks like a museum telling the story of a life of travel and passion through yacht models, photographs and unusual objects. James is there, you can feel it. A glance at the shelves of the library shows an impressive array of rare and precious books, mostly dealing with navigation and shipbuilding in Oceania, and demonstrates the seriousness with which Wharram and Boon studied the history and technicality of ‘double canoes’.

“I’d like our boats to be called double canoes and not catamarans, which I think is a mistake,” Hanneke explains. The word catamaran, originally pronounced ‘catamaron’, comes from the Tamil dialect of katta ‘to bind’ and maram ‘wood’, as they were actually one-man rafts used to work on the outer hull of ships. The English pirate and adventurer William Dampier, in the 1690s, was the first to describe a two-hulled vessel as a catamaran, but although catamarans might be the commonly accepted word nowadays, it’s actually a mistake.

pahi 63 catamaran

oon unfolds the plans of the Islander 39, the only Wharram design that has never been built. Many plans were hand-drawn by Boon. Photo: Julien Girardot

Hanneke unfolds the Islander 39 plan on her drawing board. Like all Wharram plans for half a century, it has been marked with her signature. Despite this unique pencil stroke, she has remained in the shadow of Wharram’s mythology for 50 years. Since 1970, Boon has drawn the majority of the construction plans by hand. They’re works of art and the best way to imagine yourself aboard a Wharram. Without her, JW Designs would not be what it is.

Originally from the Netherlands, Boon grew up in a family of sailing enthusiasts. By the age of 14 she was already building small canoes and at the age of 20 she joined the Wharram team and quickly became his co-designer. They criss-crossed the Atlantic twice in quick succession aboard Tehini, the crab claw-rigged double canoe on which James and several women lived for 10 years. Since then, Hanneke has escaped from her office whenever she can to sail thousands of miles on all the seas of the world, always using a double canoe.

Those radical vessels included the Spirit of Gaia, also built on site, through a sliding door next to Hanneke’s office. It was aboard this 63ft Pahi, Wharram’s flagship, that the Wharrams sailed around the world from 1994 to 1998. James described Spirit of Gaia as “a beautifully shaped woman he was in love with”.

pahi 63 catamaran

Boon’s design office is adjacent to the Wharram HQ in Devoran and looks out over one of the River Fal’s many creeks. Photo: Julien Girardot

In Wharram’s wake

James and Hanneke’s home is a former veterinary surgery. The furnishings are basic, with only the essentials, but the doors close by themselves, thanks to an ingenious system of weights, ropes and pulleys. Benjamin and I offer to shop and cook, and in the living room, we put the dishes down and eat on the floor, like on the deck of a Wharram.

Jamie, James and Hanneke’s son, joins us for the meal with his partner Liz. “James has remained the icon of the business, but it’s really Hanneke who has been doing the job for the last 10 years. She is JW Designs,” confides Liz.

Jamie is at first more subdued, but talking to him you soon discover a true character. Given the world he grew up in, it’s surprising to learn that sailing is not really his thing: “I get bored quickly at sea and I’m sick most of the time! I prefer to be underwater. Above the line is not my thing.

pahi 63 catamaran

Evocative illustration of the Wharram workshop in Devoran, Cornwall. Image: Benjamin Flao

“I do like the calmness of the ocean though, that parenthesis effect, detached from our hectic lives on land. In fact, I think the best thing about sailing is remembering long voyages, not making them,” Jamie jokes.

But he is keen to preserve Wharram’s legacy and the couple are thinking ahead to when Hanneke can no longer hold the fort. “As long as Hanneke is alive, the business will be run in her own way. But it’s certain that something will be put in place to enable people to continue to acquire the building plans, at the very least, this service will remain guaranteed.”

Back in the office next door, Nicki John answers clients and sends plans around the world. She’s only been with JWD for a couple of years, but that’s long enough for her to fall in love with the company’s story.

“One of the things I loved about James was that he came in every day. He’d knock on the door and jokingly ask, ‘Do you have time for some gossip?’ And then he’d tell me all sorts of stories. His travels, the women he had shared his life with, it was fascinating. When he was 18, he hitchhiked to Europe, smuggling coffee on the black market to finance his adventures. James’ story is just phenomenal.

pahi 63 catamaran

Mana 24 is available as a CNC-cut self-build kit boat. Photo: Julien Girardot

“One day James came in, took out a plan, unfolded it as he sat down, and said, ‘Aren’t they beautiful?’ James was deeply convinced of Hanneke’s talent. He never stopped admiring her,” Nicki says fondly.

The community Wharram fosters is unique. Nicki shows us a photo that defines the ‘Wharram spirit’, of the hull of a Wharram being lifted out of the second floor window of a home in England. With no shed to build their Wharram design, they decided to use their living room as a boatyard. “This picture shows that if you really want to build a Wharram, you can do it anywhere,” says Nicki, “During Covid, we sold a lot more plans. Confined, people dreamed of freedom and took time to figure out how they wanted to live their lives.”

Now it’s Hanneke’s turn to shine as the head of JWD. In contrast to the technologically-led path that sailing often follows, James and Hanneke’s ‘low tech’ approach drives those who follow it to reconnect with past knowledge, practices, and philosophical approaches to our relationship with the world and the way we live in it.

Their love of minimalism is also at odds with many trends in modern yachting, but it brings its own luxury. The joy of not having too much of anything allows you to make room for the essentials, and for the beauty that surrounds you.

My dream of building Wharram’s unfulfilled plan, the Islander 39, remains. I’m in no hurry. Like the libertarian vision of James Wharram, it endures.

If you enjoyed this….

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Displacemente Pahi 63: how is this possible?

Discussion in ' Multihulls ' started by eiasu , Jun 6, 2012 .

eiasu

eiasu Junior Member

I read on the Wharram website Pahi 63 : Weight 8 tons Loading Capacity 4,5 tons Draft 0,9 - 1,5 m And on their websites: Chris White Atlantic 57 Displacement 26,500lbs (12 ton) Gunboat 60 Displacement Lightship16,200 kg 35,715 lbs Displacement Max Load19,000 kg 41,887 lbs How is possible that the Pahi is so light? Built with Ply wood and Epoxy and the other two use much more expensive, sophisticated and light materials? Can't understand !!! Must be something missing ... ciao eiasu  

Corley

Corley epoxy coated

Theres lies, damn lies and boat weights they all fit into the same category. I'd want to have the boat craned out or weighed on a load cell before I believed a word of it. Also in what state? Lightship and whats defined by lightship varies from designer to designer some even weigh without essentials. Now there is an argument due to the lack of bridgedeck structure you save some weight but that much? I dont think so.  

Angélique

Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

Pahi 63 plans call as standard for 2 outboards. (2 x 9.9 Hp high trust ?) The Atlantic 57 has 2 inboard diesels with saildrives. (2 x 55 Hp Volvo's) There you might have what, a ton ? * Edit: Likely to be more than a ton, taking into account the starting batteries, engine controls and the 757 L diesel tankage for the bigger engines of the Atlantic. -- The Pahi standard starts with a pull rope and is likely to carry less fuel. Eiasu: ‘‘ Chris White Atlantic 57 Displacement 26,500lbs (12 ton)’’ 12 tons what? Empty or Lightship or Max Displacement ? If it's Max Displacement then that's ½ a ton lighter than the Pahi 63. Cheers, Angel P.S. Gunboat 60: Motors + Gensets + Solar System + Battery Bank + Some Equipment 18KW Electric Propulsion Motors with regeneration (x2) 1KW Solar System mounted on pilothouse 23KWH Lithium Ion Battery Bank Push button hydraulic centerboards and mainsheet Lewmar Electric Winches (x2) Emotion 22 KW 144 DC Generators (x2) SeaRecovery 24V AquaWhisper 600 GPD, watermaker with fresh water flush Arctic Air 144V Aircon Vertifrigo refrigerator drawers (x2) Vertifrigo freezer drawer (x2) Four burner Bosch Ceramic stove top with induction oven and Bosch microwave Iridium Phone Dual Auto-Pilots B&G Hercules H3000 Performance Package B&G Zeus Displays showing radar, charts, and sailing info x3 EMM display and CZone electrical display Marine audio system with Ipod connector, TV Screen, amplifier & speaker system with subwoofer in the salon, aft cockpit speakers Pure Yachting Carbon RIB Tender Click to expand...

;)

cavalier mk2 Senior Member

And different interiors, the Pahi 63 is flexi space meaning there is nothing there but compartments with footwells. This eliminates the cabinetry weight. Owners are supposed to furnish with hangings, galley boxes etc....  

MikeJohns

MikeJohns Senior Member

Corley said: ↑ Theres lies, damn lies and boat weights they all fit into the same category. I'd want to have the boat craned out or weighed on a load cell before I believed a word of it. Also in what state? Lightship and whats defined by lightship varies from designer to designer some even weigh without essentials. Now there is an argument due to the lack of bridgedeck structure you save some weight but that much? I dont think so. Click to expand...

sabahcat

sabahcat Senior Member

eiasu said: ↑ I read on the Wharram website Pahi 63 : Weight 8 tons Loading Capacity 4,5 tons Draft 0,9 - 1,5 m Click to expand...

Alik

Alik Senior Member

Many catamaran designers give very optimistic numbers for weight to keep the design attractive. Say, there would be weight without structural overweight margin, no genset, no teak, no air-conditioning system, no liferaft... At the end, boat is 2+ tons heavier then it was in the specs! When it comes to standard definitions, ISO8666 defines clearly what is meant by LCC (light craft condition) and LDC (loaded displacement condition). We usually show either LCC or both LCC and LDC to avoid confusion.  
Thank you everybody for your answers, sorry for my ignorance, there is something i do not follow: sabahcat said: ↑ You do realise weight and displacement are two different things? I read it as the boat weighs 8t Has a displacement of 12.5t allowing it to carry 4.5t It will have a different displacement in fresh water vs salt and a different one again if in a sea of mercury Click to expand...

:confused:

champ0815 Senior Member

Well, I think your are not so wrong! The mentioned displacement is the weight of the loaded ship to the designed water line. The weight is the mass of the more or less empty ship depending on definitions. But maybe I'm also wrong?  

Steve W

Steve W Senior Member

You cant really compare displacements of full blown bridgedeck cats like the Gunboat and Atlantic with a minimalist open bridgedeck cat like the Pahi just because they are a similar length, they are completly different animals, there is hugely more surface area with the bridgedeck boats and all this weighs something regardless of what it is built from, plus of course all the systems that just dont exist with the Pahi. Steve.  
eiasu said: ↑ Thank you everybody for your answers, sorry for my ignorance, there is something i do not follow: i do not know the difference between weight and displacement, I thought it was the same, the mass of the fluid moved, but seemingly it is not so! Click to expand...

DGreenwood

DGreenwood Senior Member

sabahcat said: ↑ It will have a different displacement in fresh water vs salt and a different one again if in a sea of mercury Click to expand...
DGreenwood said: ↑ Maybe you could explain this?? Click to expand...

Mr Efficiency

Mr Efficiency Senior Member

That sea of mercury was the dream of Carl Keikhafer ! Displacement will only be different in terms of volume, not weight.  
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Displacement is derived from the cubic volume of the hull(s) below the designed waterline, seawater = 64 lbs/cubic ft while fresh = 62.5 lbs so the boat will float diferently as Sabahcat pointed out. Steve.  

TI TI

Wharram Pahi 31 to give away

valery gaulin

Will I become crazy and build a caramaran??? Windsong, Coral Cove 31, Pahi 31

Just bought the study plans for pahi 31.

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WHARRAM PAHI 42: A Polynesian Catamaran

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The catamaran designs that British multihull pioneer James Wharram first created for amateur boatbuilders in the mid-1960s were influenced by the boats he built and voyaged upon during the 1950s. These “Classic” designs, as Wharram termed them, feature slab-sided, double-ended, V-bottomed plywood hulls with very flat sheerlines and simple triangular sections. The hulls are joined together by solid wood beams and crude slat-planked open bridgedecks.

Wharram’s second-generation “Pahi” designs, which he started developing in the mid-1970s, still feature double-ended V-bottomed hulls, but the sections are slightly rounder and the sheerlines rise at either end in dramatically up-swept prows and sterns. The most successful of these in terms of number of boats built–and also probably the most successful of any of Wharram’s larger designs–is the Pahi 42. It is an excellent example of a no-frills do-it-yourself cruising catamaran with enough space for a family to live aboard long term.

First introduced in 1980, the Pahi 42, a.k.a. the “Captain Cook,” was the first Wharram design to include accommodations space on the bridgedeck in the form of a small low-profile pod containing a berth and/or (in some variations) a nav station. Unlike the Classic designs, which have no underwater foils other than rudders, the Pahis also have daggerboards, though these are quite shallow and are set far forward in each hull. The rudders are inboard, rather than transom-hung, set in V-shaped wells behind the aft cross-beam.

As on the Classic designs, the cross-beams are flexibly mounted to the hulls, but are lashed with rope rather than bolted on with large rubber bushings. Hull construction likewise is very simple, all in plywood, and explicitly conceived to facilitate home-building by amateurs. The frames consist of a series of flat bulkhead panels fastened to a long centerline backbone with longitudinal stringers running down either side to support the plywood skin panels. Through the main central area of each hull the bulkheads all have large cutouts in their midsections to allow room for interior accommodations space. To increase moisture and abrasion resistance the hull exteriors are sheathed in fiberglass cloth and epoxy.

As designed the Pahi 42 has a single mast and flies a loose-footed mainsail with a wishbone boom. There is also a staysail on a wishbone boom and a conventional genoa flying on a bridle over the forward beam. Many owner-builders have substituted other rigs, including Wharram’s unique gaff “wingsail” rig, where the main has a luff sleeve enveloping the mast, but conventional Marconi rigs are probably the most common. The original design also calls for a single outboard engine mounted on the stern deck to serve as auxiliary power, but many owners have engineered other arrangements, including inboard diesel engines and even electric drives.

As its light-ship D/L and SA/D ratios attest, the Pahi 42 has the potential to be a very fast performance cruiser. Wharram claims top speeds in the neighborhood of 18 knots with average cruising speeds of 9 to 12 knots. In reality, however, it probably takes an unusually attentive, disciplined sailor to achieve anything like this. The Pahi seems to be more weight sensitive than most cats and typical owners, who carry lots of stuff on their boats, report average speeds more on the order of 5 to 8 knots.

The boat also does not sail well to windward, as its daggerboards are not large enough and are not positioned properly to generate much lift. Instead they act more like trim boards and help balance the helm while sailing. They also make it difficult to tack. Most owner-builders therefore consider the boards more trouble than they’re worth and don’t install them, preferring instead to retain the extra space below for storage and accommodations. With only its V-shaped hulls to resist leeway the Pahi reportedly sails closehauled at a 60 degree angle to the wind, though performance-oriented owners who keep their boats light claim they can make progress upwind faster than other boats sailing tighter angles. A few builders have also put long fin keels on their boats and these reportedly improve windward performance to some extent.

As for its accommodations plan, the Pahi 42 has much in common with other open-bridgedeck catamarans. Except for the small pod on deck all sheltered living space is contained within the narrow hulls, which have a maximum beam of just 6 feet. The standard layout puts double berths at both ends of each hull, though many may regard the aft “doubles” as wide singles. The central part of the port hull contains a small dinette table and a large galley; the center of the starboard hull is given over to a long chart table or work bench, plus a head.

Naturally, many owner-builders have fiddled the design a bit to suit their own tastes. The most significant changes involve the deck pod. Those who crave more living space tend to enlarge it; in at least one case it has blossomed into something approaching a full-on bridgedeck saloon, which must hurt sailing performance. In other instances, in an effort to save weight and improve performance, builders have omitted the pod entirely.

The great advantage of a Pahi 42, or any Wharram cat for that matter, is its relatively low cost compared to other cats in the same size range. To obtain one new, however, you normally must build it yourself. Wharram estimates this takes between 2,500 to 3,000 hours of effort. The alternative is to buy one used, which now normally costs less than building one.

There is an active brokerage market with boats listed for sale all over the world. The best sources for listings are Wharram himself and another Brit, Scott Brown , who operates mostly online. Because Wharrams are built of plywood, even if sheathed with epoxy and glass, the most important defect to look for is simple rot. This, however, is not hard to detect and, because the boats are structurally so simple, is also not hard to repair.

Specifications

Beam: 22’0”

–Boards up: 2’1”

–Boards down: 3’6”

Displacement

–Light ship: 7,840 lbs.

–Maximum load: 14,560 lbs.

–Working sail: 640 sq.ft.

–Maximum sail: 1,000 sq.ft.

Fuel: Variable

Water: Variable

–Light ship: 89

–Maximum load: 165

–Working sail: 25.91 (light ship); 17.14 (max. load)

–Maximum sail: 40.48 (light ship); 26.78 (max. load)

Nominal hull speed

–Light ship: 11.9 knots

–Maximum load: 9.8 knots

Build cost: $70K – $120K

Typical asking prices: $40K – 100K

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HANSTAIGER X1: The Trimaran To End All Trimarans

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please more info and prices for this model!

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Response to Goran below: I recommend you follow the link above to Scott Brown’s website. Lots of boats and prices there!

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Pahi 63 catamaran 1998 boats for sale & yachts, pahi 63 catamaran boats review and specs.

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Please contact at +590590294385

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Pahi 63 Boats for Sale Craigslist & Pahi 63 Specs & Pictures

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Islander 65, Vaka Motu

The Islander 65 ' Vaka Motu ' was originally designed in 2000 as an island-hopping cargo/passenger/trading vessel. With her 10 ton load carrying ability, she is also a very suitable vessel for expedition work, charter or as a dive boat.

Andy Smith Boatworks are the exclusive builders of the Islander 55 and 65 designs. They can be contacted directly if you are interested in one of these designs, or would like more information.

pahi 63 catamaran

Her interior can be either simple flexispace with cargo holds, keeping the cost of the vessel down, or with various options of cabin accommodation. For strength and lightness the hulls are built in double diagonal plywood, she is totally sheathed in WEST glass/epoxy system.

With a waterline hull beam/length ratio of 12:1 (11:1 deeply loaded), she will move through the water with minimum wave drag at speeds of 1.50 x vWLL plus, giving easy 24 hours averages of 150 to 200 miles (more if driven in ideal sailing conditions).

Good sailing ability is a major part of the design concept. The Islander 65 uses the Wharram Wingsail Schooner Rig, which has proved itself as a simple, but aerodynamically very efficient rig over many years of ocean use on Wharram's own Pahi 63 .

Several Charity groups that need simple vessels with low energy input, shallow draft, good sailing speeds and large deck space, for their projects in far flung areas of the world, are planning to use the Islander 65.

Islander 65 Charter layout

James Wharram on the Islander 65 design conception

I was rather smug about my Pahi 63 design, the 'Spirit of Gaia'. Over 9 years of world sailing, coastal and ocean, she has never let me down, brought me friends and looked after me in gales.

A surprise phone call from the Mariana Islands in the Pacific showed up a fault: lack of 'large' load-carrying ability.

Mau Piailug, a Satawal Islander and venerable figure in Inter Island Proa sailing and Preservation of the ancient Pacific Star and Wave Pattern Navigation systems, sent a message asking whether our Pahi 63 could carry at least 4 one ton fish freezers for inter island trading.

In 1995, in Raiatea, I had met Mau Piailug on our 'Spirit of Gaia' at 'The Great Gathering of Polynesian Double-Hulled Canoes' attended by replica ancient Polynesian craft from Hawaii, Tahiti, Cook Islands and New Zealand. Mau Piailug is the last of the Great Sailing Chiefs of the Pacific History. A request from him had authority.

However, whilst I respect Mau's authority, I found it not possible to change a 17:1 hull beam/length ratio, slim, fast Pahi 63 into a beamier 8 ton+ cargo catamaran.

Another problem we faced in the project was 'island building', i.e. the construction part of the design. The Pahi 63, like all my designs of the last 20 years, is a ply/epoxy/glass laminate construction, easy to get wrong without the right construction attitudes.

We had to create a new design.

Islander 65

My first range of designs (now called our ' Classic Designs ') was designed in the 1960s and 70s to be built with simple, non-power tools: hand saws, hammer, planes, chisels, nails and urea formaldehyde/resorcinol glue. They were tough, rugged, buildable anywhere designs. Using this well proven, simple construction method, with epoxy used in a less critical way would give a design able to be built by 'island carpenters'.

Construction method and material influences the styling of a design. Using our 'Classic Building Method' would mean the proposed 8 ton-cargo-carrying catamaran would resemble one of our 'Classic Designs' of the past. This was good, for the style of this design would echo the 'hard line' styling of the Proas of the Marianas not the more curvy softer lines of the ancient Hawaiian craft, which our Pahi craft echoes.

It was also good in that we had a 'sailing model' in our 50ft. Classic Tehini design. I built the original Tehini in the late 1960s. She was our ocean sailing home for 10 years.

Other people have built Tehinis and sailed the oceans (as described in an article by Iain Young, published in 'Multihulls' Sept/Oct '96). For the last few years a Tehini has been trading along the East African coast, Madagascar and Comoro Islands under the redoubtable skipper, Hans Klaar, featured in the July '98 issue of 'Cruising World'. With so much practical experience and sailing data, the new 65ft. 'Islander' or to give it its Pacific name 'Vaka Motu', just 'leapt' off the drawing board, eager to be built and go sailing with a cargo carrying capacity of 8 ton+.

Islander 65 on the beach drawing

The 'Islander 65' with a waterline hull beam/length ratio of 12:1(11:1 deeply loaded), will move through the water with minimum wave drag at speeds of 1.5 x vWLL plus, giving easy 24 hours averages of 150 to 200 miles (more if driven in ideal sailing conditions).

To drive her at these averages she has the same sail rig as our Pahi 63, the 'Tiki' Soft Wing Sail schooner rig. We know this rig can be handled by two people in gale conditions, reefed with a following wind and gives good sail drive (if cut by a trained sail maker) 37-40° off the apparent wind.

As a young man, Mau Piailug was sailing ocean-going Proas with a Crab Claw Rig. Hans Klaar sails his trading Tehini also with a Crab Claw Rig. We have therefore designed this rig also for the Islander, with less sail area than the Wing Sail Rig because of handling difficulties, but effective in winds of 16 knots upward.

Engine power to choice is delivered from the deck of the 'Islander 65' via the Pacific Rim, 'Long Tail' system. When the boat is sailing, the propeller and shaft tilts out of the sea to avoid drag. When the engine goes wrong, servicing on deck makes it easy to get at!! Engines are necessary to meet schedules, to get in and out of harbours, but they do not inspire me.

What does give me a special pleasure in this design is specifying the use of bamboo and bamboo mats for platform decking. Bamboo is nature's 'high tech fibre'. Modern western man has not yet learnt how to use it. I can see the day when Kevlar and carbon fibre will be elbowed out by the wonder material 'bamboo', a material that is both beautiful in appearance, low in cost and easily renewable.

Enough. The 'Islander 65'/'Vaka Motu' is a practical dream boat that 'works'.

Islander 65

Contact Andy Smith Boatworks

Interested in this boat contact andy smith boatworks:.

IMAGES

  1. Catamaran (Pahi 63), 19 meter

    pahi 63 catamaran

  2. Wharram designed, Pahi 63' schooner-rigged catamaran; DIY

    pahi 63 catamaran

  3. Pahi 63

    pahi 63 catamaran

  4. Pahi 63

    pahi 63 catamaran

  5. Pemba Catamarans Warram Pahi 63 1997 Boats for Sale & Yachts

    pahi 63 catamaran

  6. Pahi 63

    pahi 63 catamaran

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COMMENTS

  1. Pahi 63

    The Pahi 63 is a tribal boat, suitable for expedition sailing and for larger groups of people to cruise or eco-charter. The deck/accommodation layout resembles a village, with a central public area including 'well' and (optional) 'hearth', surrounded by private cabins.

  2. Pahi 63 Self-Build Boat Plans

    The Pahi 63 is a tribal boat, suitable for expedition sailing and for larger groups of people to cruise or eco-charter. It is based on traditional Polynesian double canoe principles, is most suitable for use in warmer climates.

  3. Pahi Designs

    The Pahi 63 was designed in 1986 and launched in 1992 to become the new ocean going flagship for the Wharram family. During the construction of 'Spirit of Gaia' many unique new solutions to plywood and epoxy building methods were developed, which were later incorporated in the larger TIKI and ISLANDER designs. About Pahi Building Plans

  4. Pahi 63 Spirit of Gaia

    In September 2012 we sailed the Wharram flagship 'Spirit of Gaia' (Pahi 63) from Trizonia to Messolonghi marina, so she could be lifted out for a major refit...

  5. About the Mon Tiki Fleet

    The Montauk Catamaran Company's sailing catamarans are the James Wharram designed Pahi 63 S/V Mon Tiki Largo, the Tiki 38 S/V Mon Tiki and the Tiki 26 Mon Tiki Mini. All three of our boats were built right here on Long Island from the keel up, by local craftsmen, using low-impact construction methods.

  6. New Zealand, Double Hulled Voyaging Waka: Pahi 63, James ...

    While sailing with Hamish, in the sounds, I told him about a man, living in Bluff, Stoney Bourke.Stoney is building a Double Hulled Voyaging Waka. It's a Jam...

  7. James Wharram

    James Wharram (15 May 1928 - 14 December 2021) was a British multihull pioneer and designer of catamarans . Polynesian beginnings Wharram was born in Manchester, England.

  8. Catamaran Man: James Wharram

    Jan 8, 2019 Wharram's timeless designs evoke a sense of history and adventure; the Lapita design was created to show how settlers from Southeast Asia could have reached the Hawaiian islands Next time you climb on board a Lagoon in the Caribbean or spy a Prout bobbing in the harbor, spare a thought for James Wharram.

  9. Wharram Cats

    Wharram catamarans currently on Brokerage . Tiki's For Sale Pahi's For Sale Classic Wharrams For Sale Current list of Tiki's for sale Tiki 31 Ply/Epoxy Philippines $US49,000 View Details Tiki 28 Ply/Epoxy In UK Deposit Received View Details Tiki 38 Ply/Epoxy just 3 years old! Asking US$129,000 View Details

  10. James Wharram: life and legacy of the iconic designer

    The Pahi 63 Spirit of Gaia which Wharram and Boon sailed around the world. Image: Benjamin Flao "He has been looking at the Islander 39 design for several years and often says, 'I wish I had ...

  11. Wharram boats for sale

    Some of the most popular Wharram models currently listed include: Ariki Catamaran, Narai Mk. IV, Pahi 42 and Tiki 38. Specialized yacht brokers, dealers, and brokerages on YachtWorld have a diverse selection of Wharram models for sale, with listings spanning from 2005 year models to 2016.

  12. Pahi 63 Study Plan (Digital Download)

    Item Details: The Pahi 63 is a tribal boat, suitable for expedition sailing and for larger groups of people to cruise or eco-charter. It is based on traditional Polynesian double canoe principles, is most suitable for use in warmer climates.

  13. Review of a Wharram Catamaran

    Re: Review of a Wharram Catamaran. Quote: Originally Posted by captnandy. Yes, the cutter rig is very flexible. We have both a yankee and genoa with the staysail, so combinations of these with reefed main keep the boat well under control. She sails well with just staysail and double or triple reefed main. The pahi designs do have dagger boards.

  14. Displacemente Pahi 63: how is this possible?

    on the Wharram website Pahi 63 : Weight 8 tons Loading Capacity 4,5 tons Draft 0,9 - 1,5 m And on their websites: Chris White Atlantic 57 Displacement 26,500lbs (12 ton) Gunboat 60 Displacement Lightship16,200 kg 35,715 lbs Displacement Max Load19,000 kg 41,887 lbs How is possible that the Pahi is so light?

  15. WHARRAM PAHI 42: A Polynesian Catamaran

    First introduced in 1980, the Pahi 42, a.k.a. the "Captain Cook," was the first Wharram design to include accommodations space on the bridgedeck in the form of a small low-profile pod containing a berth and/or (in some variations) a nav station.

  16. Pemba Catamarans Warram Pahi 63 1997 Boats for Sale & Yachts

    Pemba Catamarans Warram Boats Review and Specs. Pemba Catamarans Boats for Sale Craigslist & Pemba Catamarans Specs & Pictures. Year: 1997. Manufacturer: eGlobal Yachts. Price: EUR 190,000. (US$259,559) This is a huge catamaran ready to have up to 12 guests plus crew at an affordable price. The owner had a PAHI 42′.

  17. Pahi 63 Catamaran 1998 Boats for Sale & Yachts

    Year: 1998 Manufacturer: Price: EUR 190,000 (US$259,559) Please contact at +590590294385 Contact Information Please Add a comment before the calling of Pahi Boats, we will inform your mail address to the owner of the boats. They will reach you by email or phone. Pahi 63 Boats for Sale Craigslist & Pahi 63 Specs & Pictures listed in this advert.

  18. Wharram World

    Wharram catamarans have been built and are sailing in all the World's oceans and can be found in far away ports and anchorages. With over 10,000 sets of Plans sold since the 1960s this is not surprising. Many of the builders and sailors of Wharram catamarans are now writing blogs about their exploits and ... Largyalo is an enlarged Pahi 63, she ...

  19. Hello from San Jose, CA :: Catamaran Sailboats at TheBeachcats.com

    I'm in the process of learning catamarans. I've sailed all sorts of single-hulled vessels. I'm finding the cat to be a ton of fun. DamonLinkous. Rank: Administrator; Registered: Jul 19, 2001; Last visit: Apr 10, 2023; Posts: 3423; Posted: Oct 09, 2014 - 11:43 AM ...

  20. PDF Quantification of Building Seismic Performance Factors

    Director, and to the members of the ATC-63 Project Team for their efforts in the development of this recommended methodology. The Project Management Committee, consisting of Michael Constantinou, Greg Deierlein, Jim Harris, John Hooper, and Allan Porush monitored and guided the technical efforts of the Project Working Groups, which included Andre

  21. 6541 Catamaran St, SAN JOSE, CA 95119

    $63/sq ft. 2 years older. 6314 Nepo Dr, San Jose, CA 95119. 1 / 43. BOUGHT WITH REDFIN NOV 28, 2023. $1,685,000 Sold Price. 5 beds. 3 baths. ... 6541 Catamaran St is a 2,124 square foot house on a 6,219 square foot lot with 4 bedrooms and 3 bathrooms. This home is currently off market - it last sold on September 26, 2023 for $1,665,000 ...

  22. Islander 65, Vaka Motu

    'Oceanswatch' James Wharram on the Islander 65 design conception I was rather smug about my Pahi 63 design, the 'Spirit of Gaia'. Over 9 years of world sailing, coastal and ocean, she has never let me down, brought me friends and looked after me in gales.

  23. 6636 Catamaran St, San Jose, CA 95119

    6636 Catamaran St is a 2,563 square foot house on a 5,951 square foot lot with 5 bedrooms and 3 bathrooms. This home is currently off market - it last sold on March 01, 1975 for $52,000. Based on Redfin's San Jose data, we estimate the home's value is $1,534,093.