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The psychology of ghosting: why people do it and a better way to break up.

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By Maya Borgueta, Psy.D and Senior Coach at Lantern

Chances are you've been "ghosted" before. "Ghosting" is when someone you're dating ends the relationship by cutting off all communication, without any explanation. And we're not talking about not getting a text back after one awkward OKCupid date, but receiving the ultimate silent treatment after several dates, or when you're in a committed relationship. And while this post focuses on romantic relationships, it's worth noting that ghosting can also happen -- no less painfully -- in platonic friendships as well.

Even though the silence probably left you at best confused, and at worst, diving into your deepest insecurities for answers, an Elle.com survey found that you've also likely been the ghost yourself at some point. The survey shows that 26 percent of women and 33 percent of men have both ghosted and been ghosted, while 24 percent of women and 17 percent of men admit to ghosting (but not being ghosted on).

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So, you may already know from experience that we can't simply categorize ghosts as bad people with no respect for others' feelings.

There are many psychological reasons why someone ghosts, but at its core, ghosting is avoidance and often stems from fear of conflict. Which means, at its heart, that ghosting is about wanting to avoid confrontation, avoid difficult conversations, avoid hurting someone's feelings.

To learn more about how all that avoidance can increase your anxiety and the amount of conflict in your life, keep reading.

It's important to distinguish the "ghosting" phenomenon from escaping an unsafe or abusive relationship. You have every right to escape the latter without further communication, in whatever way keeps you physically and emotionally safe. However, if your motivation for disappearing is avoidance, then you might want to consider a better way to break up.

Scientific studies on ghosting show it's costly for both parties

Relationship research shows that ghosting (a.k.a. avoidance) is the worst way to end a relationship , according to the recipient, and can actually lead to bigger confrontations down the line. While ghosting seems to have become pervasive over the last decade, and many people point to more online dating apps and fading decorum around courting as causes -- ghosting is nothing new.

According to a study on preferred relationship ending strategies conducted in the 1970s, when one person ends a relationship through avoidance, it's likely to trigger more anger and hurt for the recipient.

Surprisingly, avoidance also costs the ghost much more in the long run, because frustrated recipients often track down and confront the ghost, sometimes in embarrassing situations like at work or in front of family.

For someone who chose to avoid conflict in the first place, a showdown is the worst outcome a ghost could hope for--and it ends up being more destructive for both parties than just initially communicating during a breakup. The study also explains the lasting cost of guilt that a ghost feels, finding that "even if the other party passively accepts the avoidance action, the terminator faces the lingering cost of knowing that he or she took the coward's way out of the relationship."

Avoiding conflict reinforces anxiety

Most people don't look forward to tough conversations, and breaking up certainly falls in that category. Fear of disappointing someone, looking like the "bad guy," or dealing with someone's direct anger can cause anxiety. But the more you avoid conflict, the more anxiety builds over time.

Each time you think about having a tough conversation, your anxiety and fear of conflict take over, and you avoid the conversation to suppress your fear.

The more you back down from your anxiety, the more likely you are to avoid anxiety-producing situations in the future. In fact, a frequent ghost is probably avoiding conflicts throughout their relationship. And many of the issues they avoid are likely problems that might have been sorted out through open communication.

By working to overcome fear of conflict, you can reduce anxiety, and build courage and communication skills that are important in many types of relationships--from friendships to the workplace. Here's how to overcome your fear of conflict:

Practice with someone safe to face your fear

One of the best ways to confront your fear of conflict is with a Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) technique called exposure. Exposure means putting yourself into the situation you fear in real-life to gradually lessen your usual anxious responses to the situation. You don't have to tackle the scariest conversations first. Build up to the toughest ones -- like relationship discussions -- by practicing with someone you trust and feel comfortable around, like a close friend or family member. If you struggle with disagreements, you can start by expressing your opinions about impersonal things like a movie or a restaurant when they differ from your friends' thoughts.

Confronting your fears gets easier the more you do it. So, after practicing with someone safe, you'll be ready to start exposing yourself to more difficult conversations. These could include small disagreements with your significant other. Over time, you'll conquer your fear of conflict and tendency to avoid hard conversations.

Take care of yourself

Exposure will probably be uncomfortable or difficult, so take care of yourself before and after. Breakups can also be as hard on the person ending the relationship as the person being broken up with. You may feel guilt over initiating a breakup, or even guilt over your sadness it ended, since you initiated the split. Keep in mind that caring about someone and wanting to be in a relationship with them are separate things.

After exposure or a difficult relationship discussion, try taking a relaxing 10-minute walk, practicing a breathing exercise, or enjoying a long bath. Give yourself credit for confronting your fear.

To uncover the thoughts contributing to your fear of conflict and learn how to challenge them, try a free 7-day trial of Lantern here . You'll be paired with a professional coach that can guide you through anxiety-reducing techniques, or listen and give you feedback on your specific relationship concerns.

-- Maya Borgueta, Psy.D and Senior Coach at Lantern

This article first appeared on Lantern's blog , which shares expert advice and research on strengthening emotional well-being.

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Ghosting: What It Is, Why It Hurts, and What You Can Do About It

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You’re in a relationship. Suddenly, and maybe without any warning at all, your partner seems to have disappeared. No calls, no text messages, no connection made on social media, no responses to any of your messages. Odds are, your partner hasn’t unexpectedly left town because of a family emergency, and isn’t lying dead in a ditch somewhere but, rather, has simply ended the relationship without bothering to explain or even let you know. You’ve been ghosted.

Who Ghosts and Who Gets Ghosted?

Why would someone choose to simply disappear from another person’s life, rather than plan, at minimum, a conversation to end a relationship? You may never know for sure why you were ghosted. While more studies need to be done specifically on the ghosting phenomenon, past research has looked at different types of attachment personalities and choice of breakup strategies; it’s possible that people with an avoidant type personality (those who hesitate to form or completely avoid attachments to others, often as result of parental rejection), who are reluctant to get very close to anyone else due to trust and dependency issues and often use indirect methods of ending relationships, are more likely to use ghosting to initiate a break-up.

Other research found that people who are believers in destiny, who think that relationships are either meant to be or not, are more likely to find ghosting acceptable than people who believe relationships take patience and work. One study also suggests that people who end relationships by ghosting have often been ghosted themselves. In that case, the ghoster knows what it feels like to have a relationship end abruptly, with no explanation, no room for discussion. Yet they seemingly show no empathy toward the other, and may or may not experience any feelings of guilt over their ghosting behavior.

What it Means to Ghost and Be Ghosted

Ghosting is by no means limited to long-term romantic relationships. Informal dating relationships, friendships, even work relationships may end with a form of ghosting. For the person who does the ghosting, simply walking away from a relationship, or even a potential relationship, is a quick and easy way out. No drama, no hysterics, no questions asked, no need to provide answers or justify any of their behavior, no need to deal with someone else’s feelings. Certainly, while the ghoster may benefit from avoiding an uncomfortable situation and any potential drama, they’ve done nothing to improve their own conversation and relationships skills for the future.

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For the person who is ghosted, there is no closure and often deep feelings of uncertainty and insecurity. Initially, you wonder “what’s going on?” When you realize the other person has ended the relationship, you’re left to wonder why, what went wrong in the relationship, what’s wrong with you, what’s wrong with them, how you didn’t see this coming.

What to Do If You’re Ghosted

Ghosting hurts; it’s a cruel rejection. It is particularly painful because you are left with no rationale, no guidelines for how to proceed, and often a heap of emotions to sort through on your own. If you suffer from any abandonment or self-esteem issues, being ghosted may bring them to the forefront.

In this age of ever-advancing technology, your ghoster is likely to appear on your various forms of social media and, if that’s the case, this person who is now physically gone from your life, is still quite visible. How do you move on? Unfortunately, there’s no magic bullet or proven advice to quickly guide you into recovery from a ghosted heart, but there is common sense.

“Avoid reminders of your ex,” advises Gwendolyn Seidman, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Psychology and Chair of the Psychology Department at Albright College in Pennsylvania. “They’re likely to cause painful emotions to resurface, and they won’t help you get emotional closure or insight into why they broke up with you.”

After you stop torturing yourself by going over old photos, saved old texts, new social media postings, and anything else you think might give you insight into the mind and current whereabouts of your ghoster (and let’s face it, you’re bound to be doing that even if you’re not normally an obsessive person), try to find a new distraction. Perhaps most importantly, know that this probably isn’t about you or anything you did wrong.

“You should realize that if your ex chose the strategy of ghosting to break up with you, it likely tells you something about them and their shortcomings, rather than indicating that the problem lies with you.” Dr. Seidman adds.

In other words, try to move on as quickly and completely as you can. Maintain your dignity and stay focused on your own health, happiness and future, leaving the ghoster to deal with the ultimate repercussions of their own immaturity and lack of courage in the context of a relationship.

  • Freedman G, Powell DN, Le B, Williams KD. Ghosting and destiny: Implicit theories of relationships predict beliefs about ghosting. Journal of Social and Personal Relationships. January 12, 2018. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0265407517748791
  • Collins TJ, Gillath O. Attachment, breakup strategies, and associated outcomes: The effects of security enhancement on the selection of breakup strategies. Journal of Research in Personality. January 28, 2012;46:210-222. https://www.academia.edu/1467823/Attachment_breakup_strategies_and_associated_outcomes_The_effects
  • LeFebvre LE. Phantom Lovers: Ghosting as a Relationship Dissolution Strategy in the Technological Age. 219-233 From: The Impact of Social Media in Modern Romantic Relationships (ed. NM Punyanunt-Carter, JS Wrench)
  • Koessler RB. When Your Boo Becomes a Ghost: The Association Between Breakup Strategy and Breakup Role in Experiences of Relationship Dissolution. Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Repository. https://ir.lib.uwo.ca/etd/5402/
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How to Cope When You've Been Ghosted

Barbara is a writer and speaker who is passionate about mental health, overall wellness, and women's issues.

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Why Do People Ghost?

  • How to Cope

What Does Ghosting Say About a Person?

Is ghosting emotional abuse.

Ghosting occurs when someone you are dating or getting to know disappears without a trace. This could happen at the very beginning of a relationship or in the middle of one, whether in person or online. Dealing with being ghosted is incredibly difficult—especially because you usually don't know the cause or know how to react.

The person suddenly quits all contact with you—they won’t respond to texts, emails, calls, or social media messages. The mental health effects of being on the receiving end of these actions can be very challenging.

Learn more about why people ghost and how to move forward if it happens to you or someone you know.

People ghost for a variety of reasons. Relationship experts and psychologists agree that people who ghost are avoiding an uncomfortable situation. This evasion, while perceived as a lack of regard, is often because they feel it’s the best way to handle their own distress or inability to clearly communicate .

Ghosters themselves admit they don’t want to hurt you or they don’t know what to do. Sometimes they don’t think discussing a situation was necessary or they became scared. Ghosting is a passive way to withdraw.

But some ghosters perceive that to disappear completely might actually be the easiest and best way to handle the situation for all. Others ghost because now that it’s common, it’s an almost justifiable way to exit a relationship nowadays.

In today’s dating culture, being ghosted and ghosting is common.

It's not always easy, and it often takes time, but there are things you can do to start to feel better even if you've been ghosted by someone in your life.

Rid Yourself of Blame

After someone disappears suddenly, it’s hard to not feel regret, embarrassment and shame. After all, you risked for the sake of growth and it backfired. While ghosting feels so personal, it’s not about you. It’s about them.

Because you usually can’t find a cause and there is no explanation furnished, you may blame yourself. You might want to put up walls so you don’t get hurt again in the future. Or you may tell your friends you will stop dating completely, using a cognitive distortion like all-or-nothing thinking .

Now is the time to regroup, be kind to yourself and take a break. You are not to blame for someone walking away without a peep. Nor is it your fault that the other person couldn’t maturely give you the truth.

Nix the Shame

Shame comes about sometimes when we are reminded of previous rejections. But is ghosting rejection?

Meredith Gordon Resnick, LCSW

Ghosting carries an echo of old rejection. It's painful because it activates—and emulates—a previous hurt or betrayal by someone we didn't just think we could trust but whom we had to trust, often during our formative years. Here's the catch: It's not necessarily about the betrayal but about our not having processed and integrated that early memory, and what it meant to us.

Resnick, whose trauma-informed books about recovery from the effects of narcissistic relationships have helped tens of thousands of readers, reassures those who were ghosted and bids them to take care.

“Understood this way, we can see why self-compassion is in order,” she says. “Being dropped and feeling unseen is always painful, and there is never shame or embarrassment in feeling what is real.”

Choose Self-Care

How do you move forward? You need self-compassion and self-care. Invest in time with friends and family who can support you. Also, you might indulge in activities that make you happy like taking a yoga class or returning to a hobby that you love. You can also try homeopathic treatments or acupuncture.

Elena Klimenko, MD, and Integrative Medicine Specialist sometimes uses a "broken heart" homeopathic treatment for a heartfelt loss . She says, “In traditional Chinese medicine like acupuncture, the heart meridian—which starts at the heart and runs to the armpits, then down each arm—is responsible for heartfelt matters and some deep emotions. Proper acupuncture treatment can also facilitate recovery and take the edge off the difficult feelings."

When you think of the ghoster, be sure to reframe your ideas about them and the relationship. After all, they violated the contract of what it takes to be in a mature, healthy relationship. That includes mutual respect, good communication and thoughtfulness. Therefore, this wasn’t the right person for you, anyway.

Build Resilience

David C. Leopold, MD DABFM, DABOIM, and Network Medical Director for Integrative Health and Medicine at Hackensack Meridian Health says, “When patients experience any emotional or mental health challenges, I focus on helping them build resilience and enhancing their self-compassion and self-care."

Dr. Leopold uses a comprehensive approach, including engaging in physical activity, prioritizing sleep, optimizing nutrition, cultivating meaning and purpose, and, reducing stress through practices like mindfulness and meditation.” 

Therefore, if you’re emotionally exhausted and stressed, where do you start in taking care of yourself? “Multiple studies clearly show that eating healthy improves mental health—reducing stress, anxiety and even depression. And any form of exercise, even just walking, is a potent natural anti-depressant,” says Leopold. 

If you’re ruminating too much, use an app to increase mindfulness or begin a meditation practice . Leopold suggests you don’t forget about finding meaning and purpose. “Studies show focusing on meaning and purpose increases oxytocin, our 'feel good' hormone, which increases feelings of connection and improves mood.” Overall, he advises that you take this time “as an opportunity to focus on you and enriching your resilience.”

Despite ghosting being normalized, it's more about the problem the ghoster is having than it is about you. Ghosting says a lot about the person in many different ways. For instance, it could say that they lacked the courage to do the right thing by explaining why they could no longer continue a relationship with you.

The person or people who ghosted you didn’t treat you with integrity, therefore, did not consider the implications of their actions. It could also signal that they may not care about their actions and are inconsiderate or unreliable.

Or, it could be none of the above. The ghoster may be dealing with a mental health or medical condition (of a loved one or their own) that is making it difficult for them to reach out at the current time.

Whatever the case may be, being ghosted is not a reflection on you or your worthiness. Nor should it render you powerless.

Ghosting is a form of silent treatment, which mental health professionals have described as emotional cruelty or even emotional abuse if done so intentionally. You feel powerless and silenced. You don't know to make sense of the experience or have an opportunity to express your feelings.

This cowardly act, unfortunately pretty normalized by our culture, can cause immense pain. As you have no clue about what happened, your mind first jumps to many possibilities. Was your new love interest injured in a car accident? Is their family okay? Maybe it’s just a crazy busy time at work and they will contact you again soon? 

You might feel a wave of different emotions: sadness, anger , loneliness , confusion. Mental health professionals find that no response is especially painful for people on an emotional level. You feel helpless and shunned without information that could guide your understanding.

Being ghosted might result in exhibiting a variety of negative emotions and questioning yourself. Don't play the blame and shame game. Hold your head up high, hold onto your dignity, and let them go. Someone better could be out there looking for you.

Practice self-care and build your resilience during this painful time. If you’re still struggling to cope after being ghosted by a romantic interest, a friend, or someone in the workplace, reach out to a doctor or a mental health professional for assistance.

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"Ghosting" is a term that is commonly used in dating and social relationships to refer to the sudden and unexplained ending of communication or contact with someone.

What does ghosting mean?

When someone "ghosts" another person, they abruptly stop responding to messages , phone calls, or other forms of communication, and essentially disappear without any explanation. This can be hurtful or confusing for the person who has been "ghosted," as they may be left wondering what happened or what they did wrong.

The term "ghosting" has become more common in recent years, particularly with the rise of online dating and social media . While it can be seen as a form of rejection or avoidance, it is not always done with malicious intent and may be a result of personal or situational factors.

What are the negative effects of ghosting?

It is important to note that ghosting can have negative effects on mental health , particularly for the person who has been "ghosted." It is generally considered a disrespectful and immature way to end a relationship or communication with someone, and is not a recommended approach for resolving conflict or ending relationships in a healthy way.

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Home » Blog » Relationships » What Does Ghosting Mean? And How To Deal With It

What Does Ghosting Mean? And How To Deal With It

  • 23 May / 2022

What Does Ghosting Mean? And How To Deal With It

Let’s imagine you’ve just started to like someone. Communication has been going well, and you’re beginning to consider making long term plans. Suddenly, this person disappears without warning – no calls, texts, or messages on social media… You’ve gone from texting each and every day to no communication at all! This leaves you thinking, what in the world could have happened? Well, chances are you’ve been ghosted.  

Although this may seem like a relatively new concept, different forms of ghosting have been around for decades. However, with the rise of social media and online dating apps, it has become increasingly easy for people to drop in and out of someone’s life, cutting ties with no explanation. In this post, we’ll be taking a closer look at what ghosting is, why people choose to ghost, how it might make you feel and some valuable tips on how to handle it!

What Is “Ghosting”?

Seen as a relatively new term in colloquial language, ghosting refers to abruptly cutting contact with someone without giving them a warning or a particular reason. If that someone attempts to reach out, they are met with silence or are even blocked from making further contact [1] . The term itself is based on the ‘vanishing’ of someone, similar to that of a ghost.

Ghosting is most commonly used in romantic relationships. However, it is definitely not limited to them [2] . Ghosting can occur in any kind of relationship – friendship, work relationships or even relationships within a family. 

In a study conducted in 2018 by the Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, it was found that 25% of participants had been ghosted by a romantic partner, and 20% had ghosted someone themselves. Ghosting in friendships seems to be even more common, with more than a third of participants claiming they had ghosted a friend, or had been ghosted themselves [3] . Surprisingly, these figures may be even higher than we thought, as another study found that 72% of their participants reported that they had been ghosted [4] .

Why Do Some People Choose to Ghost?

As you can imagine, there are several reasons one might decide to ghost someone. However, these reasons can be broken down into 2 main categories [2] :

1.It’s The Easy Way Out

For many, confrontation is incredibly difficult, and ghosting may appear as an easy way out of it. When you are no longer interested in continuing a relationship with someone, simply cutting contact or blocking someone’s number is often a preferred choice compared to having an awkward, uncomfortable conversation. 

This can also be understood as a type of avoidance which often stems from a fear of conflict. Although avoidance may seem like a simpler way out, research has shown that it often leads to more significant confrontations down the line and works to reinforce feelings of anxiety, both for the ghoster and the ghosted [5] . In fact, when conflict is continually avoided, more fear builds up, creating a type of vicious cycle.

2.Infinite Options And Dating Fatigue

The rise in online dating has created a feeling of having infinite choices, which is a big difference from walking into a bar and only having 5-10 options (if you’re lucky!). This tremendous increase in the number of choices one has can create a ‘what else?’ or ‘is there something better’ mindset. By juggling a number of online relationships, one can begin to feel overwhelmed by choices and the emotional responsibility they now hold. 

Ghosting - What is it and why people do it

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width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span><span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span><span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span><span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span><span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span><span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span><span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span><span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; 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How Do You Know If Someone Is Ghosting You?

Sometimes, suppose you’re really invested in a relationship, friendship or connection with someone. In that case, it can be hard to see through lousy communication and determine whether you are being ghosted.

Here are some questions to consider:

– Is this normal behaviour for them?

If you notice a change in their behaviour, for example, they have constantly communicated with you but have suddenly disappeared without any reason, you may have been ghosted.

– Has something in your relationship changed?

  Have you had any arguments or announced something shocking? Perhaps you told them you love them for the first time, but now they’ve lost contact? 

– Have either of you experienced major life events?

Perhaps they’ve moved into a new house, started a new job or experienced a traumatic event in their life? If this is the case, the lack of communication may be temporary. However, if not, you may have been ghosted.

Aside from these essential questions, it’s critical to recognise that more often than not, when someone values the relationship they have with you, they will always make time or find a way to communicate their feelings. 

Nonetheless, there are exceptions to this norm. Whether it be a friend, partner, or family member who has ghosted you, consider that they may be going through mental health issues, such as social anxiety or depression. Social anxiety and depression make communication increasingly difficult (with you or anyone else!). They might be struggling with feelings of worthlessness, fear, or shame, which could influence their ability to keep in touch.

How Does Being Ghosted Make You Feel

  As you can imagine, or perhaps know from personal experience, being ghosted can be incredibly difficult and can, in fact, have a real psychological impact on your wellbeing.

Similar to a sudden loss, being ghosted can take you through various stages of grief, especially if you are experiencing it for the first time. You may feel shocked or begin to question yourself. This can raise feelings of paranoia or anxiety . You may think, ‘did I do something wrong?’ or perhaps question whether they even saw your text. After a while, feelings of depression can start to kick in. For example, you may begin to question your worth, lower your self-esteem and obsess over your last interaction with the person [2] .

  Researchers have found that any kind of social rejection or ostracism triggers the same neural pathways as physical pain. As social beings, the human brain has created a social monitoring system that regulates social cues. When someone is ghosted, social cues are no longer available, triggering a process of emotional dysregulation and a loss of control [7] responsible for making you feel in distress.

What To Do If Someone Is Ghosting You

Unfortunately, there is no magic cure to end the heartbreak of being ghosted. However, professionals suggest a few tips to help you get through a potentially very tricky time [8] .

– Be realistic

If you’ve been ghosted, chances are, this person is not the one for you. Try to accept the reality of the situation rather than rationalising or excusing their behaviour.

-Allow yourself to feel your emotions.

No matter how you’re feeling after being ghosted, your feelings are valid. Sit with them, feel them, write about them or consider talking to a friend about what you’re experiencing.

– Indulge in some self-care.

Taking extra care of yourself after a breakup (friendship, family or romantic) is a great way to kickstart the process of moving on. Why not take a hot bubble bath or take some time off for your favourite hobby? 

-Don’t dwell on the person.

For many people, ghosting can ignite feelings of shame and self-doubt. During this time, it’s essential to recognise that being ghosted is not about you but rather a reflection of the other person’s emotional immaturity and communication skills.

– Avoid all contact.

Maintaining any form of contact will prevent you from really moving on. Make sure to remove your ghoster from all social media and cease all communication with them.

-Don’t isolate yourself.

Don’t be afraid to get back out there! You are an incredible person worthy of someone who recognises and respects that. Getting back into the dating scene is a great way to forget about a potential ghoster.

-Talk to someone.

If you’re struggling to cope following a breakup, consider reaching out to a mental health professional who you can talk to about your feelings. An excellent first step would be to seek out anxiety therapy , depression counselling or even relationship counselling . 

What To Do If Someone Is Ghosting You

</p><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><p><strong>Please include attribution to https://therapy-central.com with this graphic.</strong></p><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><p><a href=’https://therapy-central.com/2022/05/23/what-does-ghosting-mean-and-how-to-deal-with-it/<span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; 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width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span><span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span><span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span><span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span><span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span><span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span><span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span><span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; 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What To Say When Someone Is Ghosting You

Being ghosted can often make you feel powerless. That’s why it’s important to communicate one last time in a way that makes you feel empowered again! It’s also a great way to get closure on the relationship. Without closure, we tend to obsess over that person, allowing them to live in our minds rent-free, hindering our ability to move on and prolonging potential suffering [9] .  Here are a few lines that you can use to get a sense of closure, evict them from your mind and start the moving on process! 

– “” It was nice getting to know you; I wish you well in the future”” – this lets the other person know that you are serious about your relationships and leave no room for excuses.

– “” I can tell you might not be a good texter. Maybe we could meet in real life sometime”” – this line can be used if you’re not 100% sure whether you’ve been ghosted and would like to extend an invitation one last time.

– “It’s been a while since I heard from you, just wanted to check if you’re okay”” – this line can be used if you feel as though something might have happened or would feel more at ease if you simply checked in.

– “I’ve enjoyed getting to know you, but I’m looking for something more reliable and consistent”” – this is another excellent line to let the other person know that you don’t tolerate a lack of communication and respect. More power to you!  

What To Say When Someone Is Ghosting You

</p><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><p><strong>Please include attribution to https://therapy-central.com with this graphic.</strong></p><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><p><a href=’https://therapy-central.com/2022/05/23/what-does-ghosting-mean-and-how-to-deal-with-it/<span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span><span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span></p><br /><br /><br /><p><span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span><span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />’><img src=’https://therapy-central.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/05/What-To-Say-When-Someone-Is-Ghosting-You-.png<span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; 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Tackle Being ‘‘Ghosted” with Therapy Central

Although dealing with any form of anxiety or depression can seem like an impossible task, you shouldn’t give up hope just yet. At Therapy Central, we use evidence-based interventions such as CBT (Cognitive Behavioural Therapy) and other approaches to help individuals get their life back on track. In this way, you’ll be able to discuss your experience with relationships or being ghosted with professionals equipped to provide you with the help you need to make helpful and sustainable changes to your life.

Consider contacting one of our qualified therapists today.

You can contact us and request a free 15 min consultation to see whether our help fits your needs.

More readings:

Anxiety Therapy in London or Online    

Depression Counselling in London or Online

Relationship Counselling in London or Online  

References:  

[1] – https://www.mdpi.com/

[2] – https://www.verywellmind.com/

[3] – https://www.livescience.com/

[4] – https://online.ucpress.edu/

[5] – https://www.huffpost.com/

[6] – https://www.menshealth.com/

[7] – https://www.psychologytoday.com/

[8] – https://psychcentral.com/

[9] – https://melmagazine.com/

  • Dr. Raffaello Antonino

posting while ghosting meaning

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The ultimate guide to ghosting: why people do it, how to respond & more.

Kelly Gonsalves

Your date from last weekend still hasn't texted you back about hanging out again. A promising new lead at work suddenly stopped responding after you shared your rates. The guy on Facebook Marketplace who offered to buy your old television just never came to pick it up, and you never heard from him again.

It comes in many different forms, but the experience of being ghosted is universal. And most of us would probably agree: ghosting sucks.

What is ghosting?

Ghosting is when someone stops responding to messages and disappears from a relationship without explanation, usually in the context of dating. The term can also be used for any situation where a person abruptly stops communicating or showing up, such as when a friend starts ignoring your texts or when an employee just stops showing up to work without ever formally quitting.

"Ghosting exists on a spectrum and can happen at literally any part of dating, from disappearing from a chat on a dating app and unmatching, to leaving your text messages on 'Read' after a date, to cutting off all communication with you after years of dating," explains sex and dating coach Myisha Battle, M.S. "All of this is ghosting behavior."

Many relationship experts discourage ghosting because of the way it affects the person being ghosted. "It leaves the other person to guess at what they did or didn't do to cause you to ditch them. That guessing is the specter that looms in people's lives after a disappearance," Battle tells mbg.

According to clinical psychologist Carla Marie Manly, Ph.D. , that lack of closure can trigger feelings of uncertainty, confusion, anxiety, and even reduced self-esteem in the person being ghosted. "In general, ghosting is disrespectful and tends to perpetuate patterns of dismissiveness and avoidance," she says.

13 examples of ghosting:

  • Ignoring or choosing not to respond to someone's texts or emails indefinitely
  • Leaving someone's text messages on "Read"...forever
  • Going on a date with someone and then never speaking with them again, despite them trying to follow up
  • Unmatching with someone on a dating app in the middle of a conversation without explanation
  • No longer responding to a friend or someone you'd been talking with regularly, even when they reach out multiple times trying to get in touch
  • Suddenly cutting off all communication with someone after dating for months or even years
  • Intentionally responding slowly, briefly, or noncommittally to texts so they eventually stop reaching out
  • Setting up a date with someone and just not showing up, with no explanation, follow-ups, or apology
  • Interviewing someone for a job and then never letting them know if they didn't get the position
  • Quitting your job without telling your employer
  • Suddenly stopping showing up to your sessions with a therapist, personal trainer, etc., without telling them that you're no longer wanting to work with them
  • Scheduling an appointment but then never showing up, without warning or explanation
  • Sending someone a DM but then never saying anything else after they respond

How the term became popularized.

The phenomenon of ghosting has likely been around since the dawn of time. Consider the cavewomen who had to start getting choosy with their sexual partners because they didn't want to birth a child with someone who could disappear without a trace shortly thereafter, or the lovelorn man in Colonial times pouring his heart out in handwritten letters to some distant lover, only to never hear back. Many a '90s rom-com, too, featured a despondent leading lady hovering over a landline telephone for days on end, waiting hopelessly for the guy who took her out a few days ago to call her up and ask her out again. (He often never did.)

While the behavior itself isn't new, the term "ghosting" itself rose to popularity in the early 2010s. In 2015, after online tabloids ran headlines about how Charlize Theron "ghosted" Sean Penn , the New York Times even wrote an explainer on the term, calling it "the ultimate silent treatment." Merriam-Webster added it to the dictionary in 2017.

It makes sense that ghosting would get a lot of people talking around this time: With technology rapidly transforming the speed and ease with which people could communicate with one another, ghosting behavior likely felt even more pronounced than ever. While mailing a letter just to reject someone may have been legitimately too much time and effort back in the day, the fact that people were still disappearing on each other without a trace even now that a kinder closure was literally just a few quick button taps away...harsh!

Dating apps were also just beginning to enter into the cultural mainstream, with Tinder launching in 2012. (Though to be fair, what's often thought of as the world's first online dating site, Match.com , launched in 1995, and we can only imagine people ghosted one another as much then as they do on today's best dating apps .)

In a world where it can feel like you have nearly endless potential people to chat with, it's become easier than ever to start talking to someone regardless of whether you're actually interested in continuing the conversation with them over time. People start to feel like just pictures on your screen rather than real-life humans whose feelings you have to care about. And more starts with less follow-through (and less care) unfortunately means more ghosting.

Why do people ghost?

There are so many reasons why people ghost , but here are a few of the main ones specific to dating:

They've moved on, and they don't care enough about the other person to tell them.

In most cases, people ghost because they're no longer interested in pursuing a relationship with the other person. Instead of telling them that upfront, they go for the easiest and most convenient route: just stop responding.

"Ghosting arises due to a lack of concern and empathy for others," Manly explains, and she notes that this is true in most ghosting situations. It's selfish, passive-aggressive behavior that is grounded, as Manly notes, in dismissiveness and avoidance.

They got too busy or stressed.

The other most common reason for ghosting? They just have a lot going on in their own life.

"Sometimes when people ghost us, it's because they are focused on other things or may be isolating themselves because they are feeling depressed," marriage and family therapist Patrice N. Douglas, LMFT , previously told mbg. "Everything isn't always about us, so we can't panic right away."

They may honestly just be too busy at the moment and distracted by other life happenings, Manly notes, such as work stress, mental health issues, or other challenges. And sometimes a person may forget to respond to a text initially or plan to respond to it later when they have time or energy, but then enough time passes that they feel like there's no point in saying anything anymore.

They're worried about hurting the other person's feelings.

In some cases, people ghost because they don't want to hurt the other person's feelings, Manly adds. But if that's why you're choosing to ghost someone, the truth is that it's counterproductive: "Unfortunately, being ghosted often causes far more irritation and pain than straightforward 'I'm moving on' or 'We're not a good fit' comments might create," she says.

They're uncomfortable with hard conversations.

Ghosting can also happen when someone is just anxious about ending the relationship because they struggle with hard conversations in general. According to licensed counselor Shae Ivie-Williams, LPC, BC-TMH, CCTP , people with certain backgrounds may be more likely to ghost: "[They] may not want to have those hard conversations because maybe their family didn't have hard conversations when they were young," she previously told mbg. "And so having those types of conversations involves vulnerability." 

But even though people may find it uncomfortable to reject someone, they may be making it worse by opting to ghost: "It also doesn't feel great to be the ghoster!" Battle points out. "Most people experience some amount of guilt for ghosting."

She adds, "I have coached people on how to communicate more directly rather than ghost. Most of the time it feels harder initially, but much better afterward compared to ghosting. I've even had cases where the other person has thanked my client for not ghosting them!"

It's a power play.

Sometimes a person may choose to ghost someone because they enjoy the sense of power it gives them over the situation, says Manly. This may especially be true if the "ghoster" feels like they were wronged by the other person or if they just think the other person is a jerk, loser, or otherwise unworthy of their time. It can also just be an attempt to feel powerful, at another person's expense.

They're concerned for their own safety.

Last but not least, both Manly and Battle note there's actually one valid reason for ghosting: fearing for one's safety. "If a person is afraid that they are in an emotionally or physically dangerous situation, ghosting is often the safest exit strategy," says Manly. A person may be concerned that the other person may respond poorly to rejection by lashing out, and so leaving quietly feels like the safer thing to do.

How long does it take before it's ghosting?

There's not a set amount of time it takes before it's considered ghosting, and it doesn't matter how long you've known the person. If they stop communicating with you completely without a word despite your follow-ups, it's ghosting.

As far as how long to wait before moving on and assuming the ghost is officially gone, it depends. "If it is someone you recently met, it can be two weeks before it's time to move on. If it's a longer relationship, it ranges up to a month," says Douglas. "It truly depends on the circumstances around what was occurring before the ghosting occurred. Sometimes people just need space, and it's up to your comfort level of the time frame you want to allow for space."

Do people ever come back after ghosting?

Yes, people can sometimes come back after ghosting. This is sometimes referred to as getting  zombied , i.e., someone first ghosts you but then reappears out of nowhere as if nothing happened.

Even if a person does come back after ghosting, it's important to get clarity as to why they disappeared and why they're suddenly coming back before you decide whether to let them back into your life. They may have just honestly been busy at the time of their disappearance and earnestly want to give it another go dating you, or they could just be bored and lonely and using you to fill the time—with all intentions of ghosting you again later.

Should I reach out to the person who ghosted me?

You absolutely can! If the person who ghosted you is someone you're legitimately interested in or whose disappearance has really hurt you, you can reach out to them to ask what's going on. They may respond and give you a good explanation for their behavior, and if they're genuinely interested in you, you may even be able to pick the relationship back up.

"If you ghosted because of a personal reason that you just didn't know how to address with the other person, you can try to open the conversation again and let them know what happened," says Battle. "Starting from a place of honesty and vulnerability could help reanimate a previously ghosted connection."

However, there's also a chance that you reach out to the person who ghosted you, and they continue to be unresponsive. If nothing else, that will tell you all you need to know about how that person really feels about you.

Is ghosting abuse?

"Ghosting can certainly be emotionally abusive in nature," Manly says. "Especially if the relationship was deeply connective or promises were made, the person who was ghosted can certainly suffer from significant anxiety and depression related to the ghosting incident."

Is ghosting ever OK?

Yes, ghosting is OK in situations where you're concerned about the other person lashing out at you for rejecting them. "In cases where people are jerks to you, cross your boundaries in some way, or display characteristics that feel unsafe for you to engage with them again, ghosting might be the best option," Battle says.

How to respond to ghosting.

How you respond to ghosting depends on what you want out of the situation and out of your relationship with this person.

If you're not interested in this person anymore, just leave it be and move on. You really don't need to say anything to them, and the sooner you can get them out of your head , the better.

If this is a person you are still interested in dating or having in your life, just reach out again one more time and ask what's going on. Be direct.

Here are some things you can say:

  • "Hey! Haven't heard from you in a while. Are you still down to hang out again?"
  • "Hey, stranger. I miss you! Everything OK?"
  • "Hey, are you still interested in getting to know each other? It's OK if not—just wanna know what's going on!"
  • "Hey! I haven't heard from you in a while. I've been enjoying hanging out and would love to get together again. Where's your head at?"
  • "Hi, I know you've been really busy lately, but can you let me know if everything's OK?"

How they respond will tell you everything you need to know. If they're still interested, they'll respond positively—maybe they'll apologize, maybe they'll have a legitimate explanation for why they've been unresponsive lately, and ideally they'll show some indication that they want to keep getting to know you. If they're not interested, this will be their opportunity to let you know. And if they don't respond again—well, that's them letting you know they're truly done.

The takeaway.

When in doubt, talk it out. If you think someone is ghosting you, reach out one more time and ask them directly about what's going on and whether they're still interested in pursuing things with you. If you don't hear from them, it's time to move on.

And remember: While rejection stings, ghosting is almost always much more about the ghost's issues than it is about issues with the person being ghosted. In fact, getting ghosted says essentially nothing about you.

"Having someone ghost you says infinitely more about them than it does about you," spiritual teacher Monica Berg writes at mbg . "You're getting a firsthand look at how this person, who just days ago was so marvelous, actually handles their emotions, your emotions, and difficult circumstances in general. 'Runs away at any sign of conflict' typically doesn't make anyone's list of dream qualities in a partner, and you got to see that clearly and upfront."

And if you're the one doing the ghosting? Unless there are safety concerns at play, please know there are much better ways to reject people . Be brave, be kind, and be upfront. Don't ghost. 

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So, You Got Ghosted — at Work

  • Kristi DePaul

posting while ghosting meaning

Try not to take it personally.

Whether it’s a recruiter who has gone silent after extending a job offer or a connection on LinkedIn who stops responding, we’re seeing ghosting manifest in a number of ways in the workplace. Instances of sudden silence can easily shatter your confidence and leave you feeling confused and rejected. You’re left retracing your steps to see where you went wrong, or worse, in limbo, wondering if it’s appropriate to follow up. There are a few things you can do if you’ve been ghosted.

  • Consider your approach. Did you connect with someone and then, without missing a beat, send along a personal request? Pinging weak ties for favors makes your entire interaction seem transactional.
  • Embrace the awkward. Lots of people ghost to avoid awkward exchanges. Instead of feeling haunted by their disappearance, send a brief, lighthearted message and leave the door open for them to reconnect, or to simply let you know what’s going on.
  • If you’re the one guilty of ghosting, know that your dangling conversations can have a clean ending. Reach out to the other party and acknowledge the lengthy silence. It will help ease your mind.

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Where your work meets your life. See more from Ascend here .

Let’s say you recently met someone at a virtual conference and had an intriguing conversation about the latest trends in your field. There was definitely mutual interest in chatting further. “I look forward to catching up soon,” your new contact said.

posting while ghosting meaning

  • KD Kristi DePaul is a content creator whose writing on career navigation and personal branding has appeared in international outlets and has been cited by prominent think tanks and universities. She is founder and principal at Nuanced, a thought leadership firm for executives, and serves as CEO of Founders , a fully remote content agency focused on the future of learning and the future of work. She earned a master’s degree from the H. John Heinz III College of Information Systems and Public Policy at Carnegie Mellon University.

Partner Center

Ghosting: The Psychology Behind Why It Hurts So Much

Have you ever been ghosted? If you have, you know how painful it can be. Ghosting is when someone suddenly stops communicating with you without telling you why. It can happen in romantic relationships, friendships, and professional settings.

Being ghosted can leave you feeling confused, hurt, and rejected. You may wonder what you did wrong or could have done differently. It’s important to remember that being ghosted does not reflect your worth as a person. It’s a reflection of the other person’s inability to communicate effectively.

Research has shown that ghosting can have adverse psychological effects, including anxiety, depression, and low self-esteem . It’s essential to take care of yourself if you’ve been ghosted. Contact friends and family for support, engage in self-care activities, and seek professional help. Remember that you deserve to be treated with respect and kindness, and don’t let being ghosted define your worth.

Ghosting in psychology

Understanding Ghosting

Regarding relationships, one of the most painful experiences is being ghosted. In this section, we will explore the definition of ghosting and the origins of the term.

Definition of Ghosting

Ghosting is a term that describes abruptly ending communication with someone without any explanation or warning. This can happen in any relationship, whether it’s romantic or platonic. The person who is being ghosted is left wondering what happened and why the other person suddenly disappeared.

Ghosting can take many forms, such as not responding to messages, calls, or emails. It can also involve blocking someone on social media or simply disappearing without a trace. Regardless of how it happens, the result is the same: the person who is being ghosted is left feeling confused, hurt, and rejected.

Origins of the Term

While “ghosting” is relatively new, cutting off communication with someone has been around for a long time. However, the rise of technology and social media has made it easier to disappear from someone’s life without a trace.

The term “ghosting” first appeared in the Urban Dictionary in 2006, but it wasn’t until recently that it became a mainstream term. Today, it’s a common topic in popular culture and has been the subject of many articles, books, and even research studies.

Psychological Impacts of Being Ghosted

Experiencing ghosting can have a significant impact on one’s mental health. In this section, we will discuss the effects of being ghosted on self-esteem, anxiety, depression, and trust issues.

Effects on Self-Esteem

Being ghosted can lead to a decrease in self-esteem . When someone suddenly stops communicating with us without any explanation, it can leave us feeling rejected and unworthy. We may start to question what we did wrong or what is wrong with us. This can lead to negative self-talk and a decrease in confidence.

Anxiety and Depression

Ghosting can also trigger anxiety and depression. The sudden loss of communication can leave us uncertain and anxious about the future. We may worry about what happened and what we could have done differently. These thoughts can spiral into negative thinking patterns and lead to symptoms of anxiety and depression.

Trust Issues

Being ghosted can also lead to trust issues . If we have been ghosted before, we may start to question the intentions of others and become hesitant to open up and trust again. This can make it challenging to form new relationships or maintain existing ones.

Reasons Behind Ghosting

There are a few reasons why someone might abruptly end communication without explanation when it comes to ghosting. Here are some of the most common reasons we’ve come across:

Fear of Confrontation

Many people find confrontation uncomfortable and may avoid it at all costs. Ghosting can be an easy way to avoid a potentially awkward conversation. For example, if someone is not interested in continuing a romantic relationship, they may ghost their partner instead of having a difficult conversation about their feelings.

Lack of Emotional Maturity

Ghosting can also be a sign of emotional immaturity . Someone who is not emotionally mature may not know how to handle difficult conversations or be unable to express their feelings healthily. Instead of communicating their thoughts and feelings, they may disappear.

Desire for Control

In some cases, ghosting can be a way for someone to maintain control in a relationship. By abruptly ending communication, they can dictate the terms of the relationship and avoid being vulnerable or open with their partner. This can be particularly common when one person feels more power or control in the relationship.

It’s important to note that while ghosting can be hurtful and frustrating, it’s not always a reflection of the person being ghosted. In many cases, the person doing the ghosting is dealing with their issues and may be unable to communicate effectively. It’s important to practice self-care and seek support from friends or a therapist if you’ve been ghosted.

Coping with Ghosting

Being ghosted can be a painful experience, leaving us feeling hurt, confused, and rejected. However, it’s important to remember that we are not alone in this experience. Many people have been ghosted, and there are strategies we can use to cope with the aftermath. This section will discuss some self-care strategies and when to seek professional help.

Self-Care Strategies

Self-care is an essential part of coping with being ghosted. Here are some strategies that can help:

  • Take care of your physical health:  Ensure you get enough sleep, eat well, and exercise regularly. These activities can help reduce stress and improve your mood.
  • Practice self-compassion:  Be kind to yourself and avoid self-blame. Remember that being ghosted says more about the other person than it does about you.
  • Stay connected:  Reach out to friends and family for support. Talking about your feelings with someone you trust can help you process your emotions.
  • Engage in activities you enjoy:  Do things that make you happy, whether reading a book, watching a movie, or going for a walk. Engaging in enjoyable activities can help boost your mood and reduce stress.

Seeking Professional Help

In some cases, being ghosted can trigger feelings of depression, anxiety, or low self-esteem. If you are struggling to cope with being ghosted, it may be helpful to seek professional help. Here are some signs that it may be time to seek help:

  • Your emotions are interfering with your daily life:  If your feelings are impacting your ability to work, study, or engage in other activities, it may be time to seek help.
  • You are experiencing symptoms of depression or anxiety:  Symptoms such as persistent sadness, loss of interest in activities, or feelings of hopelessness may indicate that you are experiencing depression. Similarly, symptoms such as excessive worry, restlessness, or panic attacks may mean that you are experiencing anxiety.
  • You are having thoughts of self-harm or suicide:  If you are experiencing thoughts of self-harm or suicide, it is essential to seek help immediately. Call a crisis hotline or go to the emergency room for support.

Preventing Ghosting

We can minimize the risk of being left in the dark when preventing ghosting. Effective communication and setting boundaries are two key components that help us avoid ghosting.

Effective Communication

One of the most important things we can do to prevent ghosting is to communicate effectively. This means being clear and direct about our intentions, feelings, and expectations. It’s important to express ourselves in a way that is respectful and considerate of the other person’s feelings while also being honest and upfront about our own.

Here are some tips for effective communication:

  • Be clear and direct: Don’t beat around the bush or leave things open to interpretation. Say what you mean and mean what you say.
  • Use “I” statements: Instead of blaming or accusing the other person, focus on your feelings and experiences. For example, say, “I feel hurt when you don’t respond to my messages” instead of, “You’re ignoring me.”
  • Listen actively: Communication is a two-way street. Ensure you’re actively listening to the other person and considering their feelings and perspectives.
  • Be open to feedback: Don’t get defensive or dismissive if the other person has feedback or criticism for you. Use it as an opportunity to learn and grow.

Setting Boundaries

Another critical aspect of preventing ghosting is setting boundaries. Boundaries help us establish what is and isn’t acceptable in our relationships and can prevent us from getting hurt or feeling disrespected.

Here are some tips for setting boundaries:

  • Know your limits: Reflect on what you’re comfortable with and what is not. This might include how often you want to communicate, what topics are off-limits, or your expectations for the relationship.
  • Be clear and assertive: When setting boundaries, be clear and assertive about what you need. Don’t apologize or make excuses for your boundaries.
  • Stick to your boundaries: Once you’ve set them, it’s essential to stick to them. This shows that you respect yourself and your needs and can prevent others from taking advantage of you.
  • Be willing to compromise: While sticking to your boundaries is essential, it’s also important to compromise when appropriate. This shows you’re flexible and open to finding solutions for everyone.

Ghosting in Different Relationships

When it comes to ghosting, it’s not just limited to romantic relationships. It can happen in any relationship, including friendships and professional relationships. This section will explore how ghosting can manifest in different relationships.

Romantic Relationships

Ghosting in romantic relationships is the most well-known form of ghosting. It’s when one person suddenly stops communicating with the other person without any explanation. This can leave the other person feeling confused, hurt, and rejected. Sometimes, the ghosting person may have lost interest, found someone else, or dealt with personal issues. However, it’s important to note that ghosting is not acceptable to end a relationship. It’s always better to have an open and honest conversation, even if it’s complicated.

Friendships

Ghosting can also happen in friendships and can be just as painful as in romantic relationships. It may happen when one friend suddenly stops responding to messages or making plans, leaving the other confused and hurt. In some cases, the ghosting person may be dealing with personal issues or have grown apart from the other person. However, it’s important to remember that friendships are meaningful, and having an honest conversation about your feelings is always better.

Professional Relationships

Ghosting can even happen in professional relationships, which can be particularly damaging. It may occur when a colleague suddenly stops responding to emails or calls, leaving the other person frustrated and confused. This can have serious consequences, especially if the two people need to work together on a project or meet deadlines. It’s important to remember that communication is vital in any professional relationship, and it’s always better to have an open and honest conversation about any issues.

Frequently Asked Questions

Why do people ghost others.

Ghosting is a common phenomenon in modern dating and socializing. Some people may choose to ghost others because they find it easier than having a difficult conversation. They may be afraid of hurting the other person’s feelings or may not know how to express their own feelings. Others may ghost because they are not interested in pursuing a relationship further and do not want to deal with the potential drama that may come with a breakup.

What are the psychological effects of being ghosted?

Being ghosted can have a significant impact on one’s emotional well-being. It can lead to feelings of rejection, confusion, and self-doubt. It can also cause anxiety and depression, especially if the person being ghosted was emotionally invested in the relationship. Studies have shown that being ghosted can activate the same areas of the brain that are activated during physical pain, making it a very real and painful experience.

How can being ghosted affect your self-esteem?

Being ghosted can lead to a decrease in self-esteem and self-worth. It can make you question your attractiveness, personality, and overall value as a person. It can also lead to feelings of inadequacy and a sense of failure. It is important to remember that being ghosted is not a reflection of your worth as a person, but rather a reflection of the other person’s inability to communicate effectively.

What are some ways to cope with being ghosted?

There are several ways to cope with being ghosted, including:

  • Give yourself time to process your emotions
  • Reach out to friends and family for support
  • Practice self-care, such as exercise, meditation, or hobbies you enjoy
  • Try to focus on the positive aspects of your life and the relationships that are still meaningful to you
  • Consider seeking professional help if your emotions become overwhelming or interfere with your daily life

Is ghosting a sign of emotional immaturity?

Ghosting can be a sign of emotional immaturity, as it shows a lack of consideration for the other person’s feelings and an inability to handle difficult conversations. However, it is important to remember that people may ghost for a variety of reasons, and it does not necessarily mean that they are emotionally immature in all aspects of their life.

How can you prevent being ghosted in the future?

While there is no surefire way to prevent being ghosted, there are some steps you can take to minimize the risk. These include:

  • Communicating openly and honestly with potential partners
  • Paying attention to red flags in the relationship, such as inconsistent communication or lack of effort
  • Being clear about your expectations and boundaries
  • Taking things slow and not investing too much emotionally too quickly
  • Trusting your instincts and being willing to walk away if the relationship is not healthy or fulfilling.

Ghosting is a common phenomenon in modern dating and socializing. Some people may choose to ghost others because they find it easier than having a difficult conversation. They may be afraid of hurting the other person's feelings or may not know how to express their own feelings. Others may ghost because they are not interested in pursuing a relationship further and do not want to deal with the potential drama that may come with a breakup.

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Being ghosted can lead to a decrease in self-esteem and self-worth. It can make you question your attractiveness, personality, and overall value as a person. It can also lead to feelings of inadequacy and a sense of failure. It is important to remember that being ghosted is not a reflection of your worth as a person, but rather a reflection of the other person's inability to communicate effectively.

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  • Getting Ahead
  • Job Ghosting Is Real: Here's...

Job Ghosting Is Real: Here's What You Need to Know

6 min read · Updated on October 20, 2021

Iswari Nallisamy

Did you know job ghosting is real? And could be happening to you?

You've probably heard of “ghosting” in the context of dating: You go out with someone cute, have a great time together, and come back home expecting a second date. You wait by the phone nervously for the next few weeks to hear nothing at all, finally realizing that you've been ghosted. Believe it or not, ghosting happens in the working world, too. Job ghosting is becoming incredibly common, with one-third of candidates reporting that they were rejected from a job position by never actually getting a response in the first place.

This means hiring managers and employers are leaving candidates to wait in agony only to be ghosted after submitting their resume, after the interview, or even getting ghosted after multiple interviews. So, why would a hiring manager do this? Amanda Augustine, our career advice expert, weighs in on this practice. 

You don't make it through the ATS screening

When you don't hear back from the hiring manager, you might be wondering if you've made a mistake on your resume. Of course, it's entirely possible that you might have made spelling errors or missed critical information that led to your resume being thrown aside. However, if your resume is solid and you're still getting ghosted, this might simply be due to the sheer volume of resumes being submitted for the job opening. 

“The reality is that, on average, companies receive 250 applications per job advert — far more than an HR manager could possibly review by hand,” explains Augustine. “Which is why nearly all large organizations use software known as an applicant tracking system (ATS) to scan resumes and eliminate the least-qualified candidates for a role.” However, the ATS can easily reject more than half of the resumes before the recruiter even sees them! So how do you beat this system?

The best way to work the ATS to your advantage is by looking up three to five job positions similar to the role you're applying for and identifying the keywords in each of these descriptions. Include these words two or three times in your resume, particularly in the “Key Skills” and “Work History” sections. If you've already sent in your application, try to search for the hiring manager's contact information on the company's website or social media pages and reach out. “Keep your note short when you do — only say enough to reaffirm [your enthusiasm] and quickly summarize your relevant qualifications,” suggests Augustine. 

The job opening was put on hold

Sometimes, you might've been ghosted simply because the job opening doesn't exist anymore. This is not uncommon at all. Perhaps the department's budget was cut, leading to a hiring freeze. Or maybe the management team is still debating the requirements for this role in particular. More often than not, an internal reorganization could have taken place and the position you applied for just vanished. Unfortunately, there are no laws requiring hiring managers to give you feedback after an interview. So, what do you do to ensure that you get an update?

If you made it to the interview stage, it's best to end your interview by asking when you can expect to hear about the next steps. If you don't hear anything by then, send an email reminder that highlights your interest and politely ask for an update. Be more specific in your message to stand out. Something along the lines of “Can we hop on the phone for a few minutes? I have just one more question about this position” is more likely to get a response than a generic email. However, Augustine says you should cut your losses five weeks after the interview. After all, how the future employer treats you now says a lot about how you will be treated once you join the team — and making you wait isn't the best sign.  

Related:   How to Spot a Toxic Workplace — Before You Take the Job

You finished second to an internal candidate

Some companies tend to post job openings and interview external candidates even when they already have an internal candidate in mind. Unfortunately, there is nothing you can do to avoid getting ghosted for this reason. However, if you love the company and really want to work there, don't hesitate to follow up. 

“Wait for a new reason to reach out to your primary contact at the company later down the line,” says Augustine. “Follow the business on social media or set up Google News Alerts, so, say, if they win an award, land a big contract or expand into a new area, you can reach out and congratulate them.”

Ghosting the interviewer

Job ghosting works both ways. Some candidates go for job interviews and then realize that they're not really interested in that role. When this happens, many candidates feel just fine disappearing instead of politely declining the job offer. Yet, job ghosting is not a respectful practice, and you could end up burning bridges that you'll need in the future. 

If you're not sure whether you're really interested in a particular role, read over the job description carefully. Visualize yourself being in that role for five days a week over the next few years. If you can't imagine taking up the role, just send a polite response to the hiring manager saying that you don't think this position is the best fit for you. Be sure to always end things on a positive note!

We know job ghosting is both annoying and, quite frankly, demoralizing, but don't let it negatively impact your job search. Odds are, you don't want to work for employers who are known for ghosting job candidates, so look at it as dodging the bullet and keep going forward with your search. 

Want to avoid getting ghosted by a prospective employer? First step: Make sure your resume is rock solid. One of our TopResume writers can help!  

Recommended Reading: 

How to Find a Job Fast in 8 Painless Steps

Can't Get a Job Interview? How to Improve Your Resume's Success Rate

Lessons Learned: Job Searching in the Current Job Market

Related Articles:

8 Tips to Stand Out in a Competitive Job Market

There's Nothing Wrong With Having a Gap Between Jobs

7 Signs Your Resume is Making You Look Old

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posting while ghosting meaning

The Meaning of Ghosting: What It Is and How To Use It

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What is ghosting, and what does it mean if someone ghosts you on a dating app? This article covers the slang meaning of ghosting.

posting while ghosting meaning

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You might think that the word ghosting refers to an act by a scary spirit or is related to Halloween. However, this slang term refers to a widespread phenomenon on dating apps. Continue reading to learn about the meaning of ghosting.

posting while ghosting meaning

What Does the Word Ghosting Mean?

According to Dictionary , the word ghosting refers to abruptly ending contact with a person without warning or explanation. This most often occurs in romantic relationships and is a frequent practice on online dating apps. 

When someone ghosts another person, they cut off all contact at every source. This means blocking someone’s phone number, blocking them on social media, avoiding them, and probably having their friends and social circles avoid the ghosted person, too. This rejection results in a lack of closure for the ghosted person. 

Bottom line? Don’t ghost, have empathy, and confront your feelings.

Why Do People Ghost?

There are many reasons why a person might choose to ghost someone. However, just because these are reasons why a person might ghost doesn’t mean that ghosting isn’t hurtful. It can feel like emotional cruelty, especially if someone is ghosted during a long-term relationship. 

A person might ghost to avoid confrontation of their own shortcomings, there might be outside social circumstances, or a person might ghost because it’s the easy way out. The one circumstance in which ghosting might be acceptable is in a domestic violence situation where the person needs to protect their own safety when leaving their partner. 

How Does Ghosting Feel?

Ghosting can inflict deep emotional pain. For the ghosted person, being suddenly left from a friendship or romantic relationship without cause can lead to depression, anxiety, low self-esteem, heightened emotions, feelings of guilt, and more. These can all reach different levels, even including physical pain. Consider talking to mental health professionals if you have been ghosted.

What Is the Origin of the Word Ghosting?

According to Very Well Mind , the term ghosting actually originated in 1990s hip-hop music, in which ghosting referred to a person who left or moved away and did not leave any way to contact them. It was also used to refer to an Irish goodbye or Irish exit, which is the act of leaving a party without telling anyone. 

As the advent of online dating grew throughout the 2010s, so did the term ghosting. This word was added to the Merriam-Webster dictionary in the year 2017. Online dating has made it easier to completely cut off contact with a person and never reply to them, so ghosting has become more commonplace.

How Can the Word Ghosting Be Used in a Sentence?

There are many ways in which a person might use the word ghosting to describe being abruptly left. These example sentences can help get you started with using the casual word ghosting. Be sure to avoid the word ghosting in professional or formal settings:

She totally ghosted me out of nowhere. I don’t understand today’s dating world. 

I thought we were on track to get married, but then he ghosted me out of the blue. I couldn’t get in contact with his family or friends to figure out what was going on, either. They came to move his stuff out while I was at work one day.

I am a bit nervous to tell the person I went on a few dates with that I don’t want to see them anymore, but I will not ghost someone.

What Are Synonyms of the Word Ghosting?

Ghosting is considered a slang term, but there are many formal or professionals words that you can use its place. Using synonyms for ghosting can also be helpful if a person does not know the meaning of the word and you’re trying to explain it to them. Reference this list of ghosting synonyms from Power Thesaurus when you need one!

  • be lost to sight
  • be lost to view
  • cease to exist
  • cut and run
  • dematerialize
  • pass from sight
  • recede from view

What Are Antonyms of the Word Ghosting?

There are plenty of words that mean the opposite of ghosting and can be used to describe a person appearing out of nowhere. If you’re looking for a word to describe the opposite of ghosting, these antonyms from Power Thesaurus can help get you started.

  • appear again
  • be remembered
  • be repeated
  • come and go
  • come up again
  • coming again
  • crop up again
  • happen again
  • haunt thoughts
  • occur again
  • reappearing
  • return to mind

Ghosting is a phenomenon in which a person cuts off all contact with another person with no explanation or reasoning. This most often happens on online dating and can also happen in long-term romantic relationships or friendships. People find ghosting extremely hurtful, and it can be seen as cowardly.

  • Ghosting | Dictionary.com  
  • Disappear synonyms – 1 194 Words and Phrases for Disappear | Power Thesaurus 
  • What Is ghosting? | Very Well Mind  
  • Reappear Synonyms | Power Thesaurus  

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Kevin Miller is a growth marketer with an extensive background in Search Engine Optimization, paid acquisition and email marketing. He is also an online editor and writer based out of Los Angeles, CA. He studied at Georgetown University, worked at Google and became infatuated with English Grammar and for years has been diving into the language, demystifying the do's and don'ts for all who share the same passion! He can be found online here.

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What Is Soft Ghosting and Why Do People Do It?

Anna Drescher

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Anna Drescher is a freelance writer and solution-focused hypnotherapist, specializing in CBT and meditation. Using insights from her experience working as an NHS Assistant Clinical Psychologist and Recovery Officer, along with her Master's degree in Psychotherapy, she lends deep empathy and profound understanding to her mental health and relationships writing.

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“Soft ghosting” refers to a behavior where one person gradually reduces their level of communication or interaction with another person without fully cutting off contact. Unlike traditional ghosting where all contact abruptly stops, soft ghosting involves a more gradual and subtle reduction in communication.

In soft ghosting, the person may still respond to messages, but their responses are often brief, delayed, and lacking in enthusiasm.

For example, someone might respond with a one word answer, send an emoji, or simply “like” the text without further engagement.

illustration of chatting and messaging concept. Characters chatting on smartphone with chat bubbles and emoji icons.

While the approaches and intentions behind traditional ghosting and soft ghosting differ, the goal is often the same: to create distance and/or end a relationship without having to engage in direct confrontation.

Soft ghosting can be seen as a less harsh way of disengaging compared to full ghosting, as it involves intermittent responses and reduced enthusiasm rather than a complete silence.

However, in both cases, the result is a form of communication breakdown and emotional distance between the individuals involved.

Both forms of ghosting have become increasingly common in the modern dating world. It’s important to note, though, that neither approach is considered a healthy or respectful way of handling a relationship.

How to Know I️f You Are Being Soft Ghosted

Recognizing if you’re being soft ghosted can be challenging, as the signs are often subtle and can vary based on the individual and the nature of your relationship.

First, be sure to keep in mind that people’s lives and circumstances can change, and there might be legitimate reasons for altered communication patterns. For example, they might be having a busy week or are taking a break from their phone.

Soft ghosting is not always clear-cut, so it is important to consider their usual behavior and whether it has changed. 

However, if you consistently notice several of the signs detailed below, it might be worth addressing the situation with the person.

  • They are taking longer to respond to your messages compared to how they used to.
  • When they do respond, their messages are brief, unenthusiastic, and lacking in detail.
  • They rarely or never take the initiative to start a conversation or suggest spending time together, even though they used to before.
  • If you suggest making plans or meeting up, they might consistently come up with excuses or avoid committing to specific dates or times.
  • If you do manage to make plans, they might cancel or reschedule more frequently than usual.
  • They seem less interested in your life, interests, or experiences, and the conversations feel one-sided.
  • When you inquire about their behavior, they might provide vague excuses about being busy or stressed without offering much detail.

Trust your intuition and gut feeling – If you’re getting the sense that someone has lost interest, it’s important to acknowledge these feelings.

To summarize:

  • Misinterpretations can happen, especially in the early stages of a relationship. It’s important to consider various factors (e.g., they might be busy due to work, personal commitments, or other responsibilities) before jumping to conclusions.
  • If you find yourself feeling uneasy, anxious, or confused due to a change in someone’s behavior, consider having an open and honest conversation with the person.
  • If you’re getting strong signals that someone has lost interest, it’s worth paying attention to those signals and addressing the situation.

Why Do People Soft Ghost?

People might engage in soft ghosting for a variety of reasons. The ultimate goal of soft ghosting is often to create distance or end a relationship, but in a more subtle and gradual manner than traditional ghosting.

Soft ghosting can be seen as a less harsh way of disengaging as it is often driven by a desire to avoid hurting another person. However, it can still lead to confusion and frustration due to the lack of clarity in intentions.

People might engage in soft ghosting for a variety of reasons, including:

Avoiding Confrontation

Soft ghosting can be a way to avoid having a direct and potentially uncomfortable conversation about not being interested or wanting to end the relationship.

Some individuals find it easier to gradually disengage rather than directly address their lack of interest or intentions.

People who are uncomfortable with conflict might use soft ghosting as a way to fade out of a relationship without having to explicitly state their reasons.

Additionally, soft ghosting might be seen as a gentler way of distancing oneself compared to outright ghosting.

Lack of Interest

If someone becomes less interested in the person they’re communicating with, they might naturally start investing less time and effort into the relationship without outright ending it.

Their initial interest might have faded or they might realize that they’re not as compatible as they initially thought, which can lead to a natural decrease in communication.

Or, a person may soft ghost to avoid commitment. If they sense that the relationship is getting more serious but they are not interested in pursuing a long-term commitment, they might start pulling back gradually.

Uncertainty

If someone is unsure about their own feelings or interest in the other person, they might use soft ghosting as a way to buy time and avoid making a definitive decision.

They may want to keep the door slightly open without having to fully commit or end the relationship.

Additionally, some individuals might use soft ghosting as a strategy to gauge the other person’s level of interest.

If the other person continues to reach out despite the reduced communication, it could indicate a stronger interest.

Soft ghosting might be perceived as less hurtful than outright ghosting. Some individuals might feel guilty for letting another person down, so they resort to soft ghosting instead of cutting off all communication.

They also might believe they’re letting the other person down more gently, even though soft ghosting can still lead to confusion and hurt feelings.

Lack of Communication Skills

Some people may struggle with expressing their feelings and intentions clearly, so they opt for soft ghosting as a way to navigate these situations.

What to Do if You Think You Are Being Soft Ghosted

If you think you are being soft ghosted, there are a few steps you can consider taking.

Before jumping to conclusions, remember that people can have legitimate reasons for reduced communication. Give them some time, especially if you know they’re going through a busy or stressful period.

However, if you have noticed a significant change in their behavior, you should address it. You can initiate a conversation in a non-confrontational manner and express your feelings openly.

Let them know that you have noticed a shift in their behavior and ask if everything is okay on their end.

If they explain that they’ve been busy or dealing with personal issues, offer your understanding and support. But if their responses continue to be vague and unenthusiastic, it might be best to accept that the other person might not be as interested as you are.

You don’t need to keep investing emotional energy into a situation that’s causing you distress.

Are They Soft Ghosting or Just Busy?

Consider the person’s past communication patterns. Have they consistently been responsive and engaged in the past? A sudden change in behavior is more likely to be an indicator of something beyond just being busy.

If they have shared that they’re going through a busy period due to work, personal matters, or other commitments, and they provide reasonable explanations, it’s more likely that they are genuinely busy.

However, if they claim to be busy but their behavior continues to contradict this, there might be more to the situation. If someone is truly interested in you, they will put in the effort.

Is It Better to Be Soft Ghosted Than Ghosted?

While neither being soft ghosted nor ghosted is an ideal situation, some individuals might find soft ghosting to be less hurtful and more respectful compared to traditional ghosting

However, it’s important to note that soft ghosting can still lead to confusion, frustration, and hurt feelings.

Additionally, whether it’s soft ghosting or ghosting, both behaviors can be indicative of a lack of interest in pursuing a relationship.

Should I Ask Them Why They Soft Ghosted Me?

If you’re in a situation where you suspect you’re being soft ghosted, it’s generally a good idea to ask for clarification.

Asking why someone has reduced their communication can provide you with insights into their intentions and help you better understand the situation.

Regardless of their answer, thank them for being honest and open. If they share their reasons, respect their choice even if you disagree.

Is Soft Ghosting Similar to Breadcrumbing?

While both soft ghosting and breadcrumbing are behaviors that involve reduced or inconsistent communication, they have slightly different dynamics and intentions.

Breadcrumbing is a behavior where someone gives intermittent and sporadic attention to keep the other person interested without any intention of forming a meaningful relationship.

It’s like leaving a trail of “breadcrumbs” to keep someone following, even though the person doing the breadcrumbing doesn’t have genuine intentions of commitment.

While both soft ghosting and breadcrumbing involve inconsistent communication, soft ghosting is a gradual reduction in interaction that might still involve some genuine interest or uncertainty, whereas breadcrumbing is more about stringing someone along with intermittent attention without any sincere commitment or intention to form a meaningful connection.

This article was edited by Julia Simkus .

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What Does Ghosting Mean? – Meaning, Uses and More

posting while ghosting meaning

What Does Ghosting Mean?

The term ghosting is a slang term that refers to abruptly leaving a social gathering or cutting off contact with someone, typically a romantic partner, without any explanation or warning. It can also be used in the context of gaming to describe the act of observing an opponent’s gameplay. The term originated from the concept of someone disappearing like a ghost without leaving any trace. Ghosting has become prevalent in the dating world due to the convenience of technology and the desire to avoid face-to-face confrontation. However, being ghosted can be frustrating for the person on the receiving end. In gaming, ghosting is considered cheating by some players as it provides an unfair advantage by allowing the observer to see their opponents’ actions. It’s important to note that ghosting does not have a sexual connotation and is not a typo or typing mistake.

What Does Ghosting Mean From a Girl?

When a girl uses the term ghosting , it generally means the same thing as when a guy uses it. Ghosting refers to abruptly cutting off contact with someone, usually a romantic partner, without any explanation or warning. It’s like disappearing into thin air, leaving the other person confused and wondering what happened.

Here are some key points to consider:

  • Specific meaning from a girl : Girls may use ghosting to end a relationship or to express their frustration with someone’s behavior. It can also be used as a way to protect themselves from potential harm or discomfort.
  • How girls use it : Girls may use ghosting in conversations with their friends or when discussing their dating experiences. It can be used as a way to vent or seek advice from others who have had similar experiences.
  • How to reply : If you’ve been ghosted by a girl and you want closure or an explanation, it’s okay to reach out and ask for one. However, it’s important to respect her decision if she chooses not to respond. It’s also important to take care of yourself and focus on moving forward.

While the general meaning of ghosting is the same for everyone, girls may have different perspectives and experiences with it compared to guys. Some girls may use ghosting as a defense mechanism to protect themselves from potential harm or discomfort in relationships. Others may use it as a way to assert their independence and avoid confrontations.

If you’re currently talking to a girl on Tinder, TikTok, or Snapchat, and she suddenly stops responding or disappears without any explanation, it’s possible that she has ghosted you. It can be frustrating and confusing, but remember that everyone has their reasons for ghosting and it’s important to respect their decision.

  • Girl A: So, I went on a date with this guy last night.
  • Girl B: Oh, how did it go?
  • Girl A: Terrible! He was so rude and disrespectful. I think I’m going to ghost him.
  • Girl: I’ve been talking to this guy for a while, but he’s been acting really shady lately.
  • Friend: Ugh, that’s the worst. You should totally ghost him and find someone better.
  • Girl A: I can’t believe he stood me up again!
  • Girl B: Seriously? That’s the third time. You should ghost him and move on.
  • Girl: I’ve been texting this guy for weeks, but he never makes plans to meet up. I think I’m just going to ghost him.
  • Girl A: I’ve been seeing this guy for a few months, but he’s been acting distant lately.
  • Girl B: Maybe it’s time to have a conversation and see what’s going on.
  • Girl A: Nah, I think I’m just going to ghost him. It’s not worth the drama.

What Does Ghosting Mean From a Guy?

When a guy uses the term ghosting , it can have similar meanings to when a girl uses it. Ghosting refers to abruptly cutting off contact with someone, typically a romantic partner, without any explanation or warning. It’s like vanishing into thin air, leaving the other person bewildered and wondering what went wrong.

  • Specific meaning from a guy : Guys may use ghosting for various reasons. It could be a way for them to avoid confrontation or difficult conversations, or it could be a sign that they have lost interest in the relationship. Ghosting can also be used as a means of asserting independence or avoiding emotional vulnerability.
  • How guys use it : Guys may use ghosting in their conversations with friends or when discussing their dating experiences. It can be seen as a way to protect themselves from potential emotional entanglements or to maintain a sense of control in their relationships.
  • How to reply : If you’ve been ghosted by a guy and you want closure or an explanation, it’s okay to reach out and ask for one. However, it’s important to be prepared for the possibility that he may not respond or provide the answers you’re seeking. It’s crucial to prioritize your own well-being and focus on moving forward.

While the general meaning of ghosting is similar for both guys and girls, there may be differences in how they perceive and use it. Some guys may view ghosting as a way to avoid emotional discomfort or difficult conversations, while others may see it as a means of maintaining control in their relationships.

If you’re currently talking to a guy on platforms like Tinder, Snapchat, or texting, and he suddenly stops responding or disappears without any explanation, it’s possible that he has ghosted you. It can be frustrating and hurtful, but remember that everyone has their reasons for ghosting and it’s important to prioritize your own well-being.

  • Guy 1: Hey, did you see that girl I was talking to? She just ghosted me out of nowhere.
  • Guy 2: Man, that’s rough. Some people just don’t have the decency to give an explanation.
  • Guy 1: I thought things were going well with this girl I met online, but she totally ghosted me after our second date.
  • Guy 2: Ugh, that’s the worst. It’s so frustrating when people can’t just be honest and communicate.
  • Guy 1: I’ve been texting this girl for weeks and suddenly she stopped replying. I think she’s ghosting me.
  • Guy 2: Ah, the classic disappearing act. It’s like they vanish into thin air.
  • Guy 1: I asked this girl out and she said yes, but now she’s not responding to my messages. I think she’s ghosting me.
  • Guy 2: That’s a bummer, dude. Some people just can’t handle being upfront and honest.
  • Guy: So I went on a date with this girl last night and it went really well. But now she’s not answering my texts. I think she’s ghosting me.
  • Friend: Ah man, that’s the worst feeling. It’s like they just disappear without a trace. Don’t worry though, there are plenty of fish in the sea!

What Does Ghosting Mean Sexually?

False, ghosting does not have a sexual or NSFW meaning. It refers to abruptly leaving a social gathering or cutting off contact with someone without any explanation or warning. It can also be used in gaming to describe observing an opponent’s gameplay.

Origin of Ghosting

The origin of the word/phrase “ghosting” in the context of abruptly leaving a social gathering or cutting off contact with someone is not clear. It is possible that the term derives from the concept of someone disappearing like a ghost without leaving any trace. However, it is not known if it was a popular typo or misspelling of another word that became popularized, similar to the case of “HODL” in the cryptocurrency community. Without more concrete evidence or historical documentation, the exact origins of the word/phrase “ghosting” remain uncertain.

Frequently Asked Questions

Slangs similar to ghosting.

The terms silent treatment, disappearing act, vanishing act, French exit, Irish goodbye, and silent departure are all similar to ghosting because they all involve abruptly cutting off contact or leaving a social gathering without explanation or warning. These terms describe the act of suddenly disappearing or cutting off contact, just like ghosting.

Is Ghosting A Bad Word?

No, “ghosting” is not a bad word or vulgar word. It refers to the act of abruptly cutting off contact with someone, usually in a romantic or social context. While it can be hurtful to the person being ghosted, it is not inherently vulgar.

Is Ghosting a Typo or Misspelling?

No, “ghosting” is not a misspelling or a typo. It is a slang term that refers to abruptly leaving a social gathering or cutting off contact with someone, typically a romantic partner, without any explanation or warning. It can also be used in the context of gaming to describe the act of observing an opponent’s gameplay.

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Razor wire at the border: Supreme Court says feds can remove barriers in Texas meant to block migrants

The ruling was a temporary victory for the biden administration while the underlying lawsuit continues..

WASHINGTON – The Supreme Court has allowed the Biden administration to remove razor wire barriers that Texas erected along a 29-mile stretch of the Rio Grande meant to block migrants at the Southwest border .

The 5-4 ruling Monday was a temporary victory for the Biden administration and gave the federal government the upper hand in its fight with Texas while the underlying lawsuit continues.

"Texas’ political stunts, like placing razor wire near the border, simply make it harder and more dangerous for frontline personnel to do their jobs," White House spokesperson Angelo Fernández Hernández said in a statement Monday.

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott, a Republican, authorized the installation of the razor wire as part of a broader effort to deter migrants from crossing the U.S. border from Mexico. That included a 29-mile stretch of the riverbank in Eagle Pass, much of which is private land .

More: Texas gov transforms immigration from a border issue to a backyard one. Dems aren't happy.

Prep for the polls: See who is running for president and compare where they stand on key issues in our Voter Guide

Texas razor wire holds back migrants − and the Border Patrol

But the Department of Homeland Security argued that federal law gives Border Patrol agents authority to access private land within 25 miles of the border and that state laws cannot be used to stop those agents from carrying out their work.

The agency told the Supreme Court the razor wire is affecting migrants who have already entered the United States and making it harder for federal border agents to apprehend them.

“It is a foundational constitutional principle that the federal government is not bound by the laws or policies of any particular state in its enactment and implementation of federal law,” U.S. Solicitor General Elizabeth Prelogar told the court.

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton said Monday that the destruction of Texas’ border barriers will not help enforce the law or keep Americans safe.

"This fight is not over, and I look forward to defending our state’s sovereignty," Paxton said in a statement.

Border security and the 2024 election

The fight over the barriers is part of a broader struggle between Abbott and President Joe Biden, a Democrat, over immigration. Biden is facing mounting pressure over the flood of migrants at the border – an issue his Republican challengers have been hammering on the campaign trail. Abbott also signed a law allowing state law enforcement officers to arrest , detain and deport people suspected of illegally crossing the border.

Siding with the administration were Chief Justice John Roberts and Justices Amy Coney Barrett, Ketanji Brown Jackson, Elena Kagan and Sonia Sotomayor. Those opposed were Justices Samuel Alito, Neil Gorsuch, Brett Kavanaugh and Clarence Thomas. None gave a reason for their vote.

More: New York City seeks $708 million from bus companies for transporting migrants from Texas

The administration's emergency appeal followed a ruling from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 5th Circuit that sided with Texas, barring the federal government from removing the razor wire barriers except in cases of emergency, such as if a migrant is “drowning or suffering heat exhaustion.”

Migrant deaths and the Texas barrier

But the Justice Department told the Supreme Court this month that additional barriers the state erected had effectively prevented the Border Patrol from being able to determine whether a migrant in that area needed emergency aid.

Soon after that claim, a migrant woman and her two children died trying to cross the Rio Grande near a park in Eagle Pass where state officials have blocked access to federal Border Patrol officers. The park contains a staging area for the Border Patrol and the boat ramp from which patrol boats are launched.

Though it’s impossible to say what might have happened to the migrants if the Border Patrol had had access to the area, the federal officers would at least have been able “to take any available steps” to help Mexico’s rescue mission, the Justice Department told the Supreme Court last week.

More: Mexican family's death at border looms over ongoing Justice Department standoff with Texas

Texas authorities blamed the Biden administration for the three deaths, saying they happened because the U.S. has failed to properly enforce its immigration laws.

They also disputed the federal government’s account of what happened the night of the drownings when two other migrants were also in distress in the river. Texas lawyers said the federal government sought to blame the state “for a tragedy that had already occurred before any federal official even contacted Texas.”

More: Texas Gov. Greg Abbott denies he's advocating shooting migrants crossing Texas-Mexico border

Contributing: Eduardo Cuevas and Bart Jansen

Darlene Lancer, JD, LMFT

Were You Ghosted? Learn Why—and How to Respond When It Happens

Uncover 8 reasons for ghosting and what you can do about them..

Posted January 7, 2020 | Reviewed by Pam Dailey

  • What Is Ghosting?
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Rejection and breakups are hard enough, but being ghosted can be traumatic ; it can leave you with unanswered questions that make it hard to move on. Although ghosting also occurs in friendships, it’s usually associated with dating . More devastating, but less common, is when a spouse disappears after years of marriage . It’s like a sudden death of the person and the marriage. But even the unexplained, unexpected end to a brief romantic relationship can feel like a betrayal and shatter your trust in yourself, in love, and in other people.

It’s a shock to the heart whenever you care about someone who suddenly cuts you off without any explanation.

If you insist on knowing and get a response like, “I just don’t feel it anymore,” it isn’t satisfying. We still want to know why. We are information-seeking animals. Our brain is wired to wonder and search for solutions. Once we pose a question, we look for answers. This is compounded by the fact that we’re also wired to attach and to experience rejection as painful. We try to reconnect—the reason babies cry fiercely when they need their mother. Rejection can cause obsessive thinking and compulsive behavior , like stalking your ex’s social media , which fuels more pain and more questions.

Ghosted in a Romantic Relationship

Breakups are always harder during the early stage of a romantic relationship. It’s devastating to be ghosted during this romantic phase, but that’s usually when it occurs. You don’t know your partner that well and are still in a blissful haze of idealization. Yet without warning, your hopes for the future may be abruptly and inexplicably dashed. Normally, a relationship progresses from the romantic “ideal” stage into the “ordeal” period when couples struggle with ambivalence and conflicts. If that ends the relationship, at least you have an understanding of why it didn’t work and perhaps you agree.

If couples can communicate and accommodate each others’ needs and personalities, they get to the “real deal—a solid relationship based on mutual understanding and acceptance. This takes two people compatible and committed to making the relationship work. They must also have enough self-esteem and autonomy to give without feeling unappreciated or robbed and to receive without feeling unworthy or smothered.

Ghosted While Dating

In dating, often there is less accountability, depending upon various factors: The way you met (a chat room or hookup app), the individual’s maturity and values, the length of the relationship, and the frequency of face-to-face contact. Technology promotes less emotional involvement. If, instead, you met through mutual friends, there’s more incentive to be on your good behavior or your friends will hear about.

Ghosting might start with an unanswered text or call or long silences between replies until there are none. Here are eight reasons why a person might ghost instead of communicating directly:

  • They’re chicken. People who don’t handle conflict well fear confrontation. They expect drama and criticism and want to avoid a breakup conversation. They may rationalize to themselves that they’re sparing your feelings by not admitting that they no longer want to continue the relationship. However, leaving without a word, let alone closure, is more cruel and painful.
  • They’re avoidant. Ghosts are more likely to have intimacy problems, which explains why they leave a relationship that’s getting close. They’re emotionally unavailable and may have an avoidant attachment style.
  • They’re ashamed. People with low self-esteem want to avoid criticism and the shame they anticipate if you get to know them better—one reason for avoiding intimacy. They also expect to feel shame for hurting you. Their lack of boundaries makes them feel responsible for your feelings, though the reverse is true. They’re accountable for how they communicate, but not for your reaction. If they want to end a relationship, you’re entitled to an honest explanation. Thus, in trying to avoid false responsibility, they err by not taking responsibility for their own behavior, causing you the unnecessary pain they were trying to avoid.
  • They’re busy. When you’re not exclusive and acknowledge that dating someone else is okay, your partner may assume the relationship is casual. While dating other people, you and/or your messages might have been overlooked or forgotten. Your date may have already moved on or just not made time to respond. When later realizing this, he or she is too embarrassed to reply and rationalizes that your “thing” wasn’t serious in the first place.
  • They’re game-players. To some daters, particularly narcissists, relationships are solely a means to satisfy their egos and sexual needs. They’re not interested in a commitment or concerned with your feelings, though they may feign they are when they’re seducing you. They’re players, and to them, relationships are a game. They’re not emotionally involved and can act callously once they’re no longer interested, especially if you express needs or expectations.
  • They’re depressed or overwhelmed. Some people can hide depression for a while. The ghost might be too depressed to continue and not want to reveal what’s really going on in his or her life. There may be other life events you don’t know about that take precedence, like a job loss, a personal or family illness, or an emergency.
  • They’re seeking safety. If you’ve raged in the past or are violent or verbally abusive, you may be ghosted in self-protection.
  • They’re setting a boundary. If you’ve annoyed and smothered your friend with frequent texts or calls, especially if they’ve asked you not to, then their silence is sending a message, because you’ve ignored their boundaries. You likely have an anxious attachment style and are attracted to people with avoidant styles. See: “ Breaking the Cycle of Abandonment .”

What to Do if You’ve Been Ghosted

If you’ve been ghosted, the main thing to realize is that in the vast majority of cases, ghosting behavior reflects on the other person, not you. It’s time to let go. Here are some dos and don’ts to follow:

Face reality.

The other person has decided to move on for whatever reason. Accepting that is more important than knowing why. The ghost is also demonstrating that he or she doesn't respect your feelings and lacks the essential communication and conflict-resolution skills that make relationships work. Your feelings aside, consider whether you really want a relationship with this individual.

Allow your feelings.

Realize that you can’t figure out the ghost’s motives in your head. Let go of obsessive thoughts, and allow yourself to feel both sadness and anger , without falling into shame. Give yourself time to grieve. Open your heart to yourself with extra doses of self-love―all you wanted from the other person.

Avoid self-blame.

Deal with ghosting in a healthy way. Rejection can be painful, but you don’t have to pile on unnecessary suffering. Don’t blame yourself or allow someone else’s bad behavior to diminish your self-esteem. Even if the ghost believes you weren’t what he or she was looking for, that doesn’t mean you’re undesirable to someone else. You cannot make anyone love you. You simply might not have been a good match. He or she is not your last hope for a partner!

posting while ghosting meaning

Don't try to make contact.

If you’re tempted to write or call, think about how the conversation will go, how you will feel, and whether you would even get a truthful answer from the person. Often, people ending a relationship won’t be honest about the reasons or may not even be able to articulate them, because they’re just going with their gut feelings . Men tend to do this more than women, who analyze and ruminate more. In addition, the odds are you’ll be rejected a second time. Would that hurt more? To heal faster, experts advise no contact after a breakup, including all social media. Read more tips on how to recover.

If you find it hard to let go and find yourself pursuing a conversation, resist any temptation to lure your ghost back. You may later regret it. Instead, communicate that his or her behavior was hurtful and unacceptable. In other words, be resolved that you’re now doing the rejecting. Then, move on. Beware that if you’re still hurting and vulnerable, contact may prolong your grief . If you don’t feel strong, such a conversation may not help you let go. Also, remember that anger isn’t always a strength. It may be a temporary stage of grief, followed by missing the person more.

Evaluate Your Boundaries.

You gave your heart to someone untrustworthy. It’s wise to evaluate your boundaries when dating. Were you easily seduced? Were you too anxious to fall in love with someone you didn’t know well? Read “To Trust or Mistrust ? Do You Trust Too Much or Too Little?”

Don’t isolate yourself.

Get back into life, and plan activities with friends. You may need a break from dating for a while, but socialize and do other things that you enjoy. Don’t allow yourself to fall into depression, which is distinct from mourning.

If you still have trouble letting go, there may be other issues involved, which are described in Why Can't I Get Over My Ex?

© 2019 Darlene Lancer

Darlene Lancer, JD, LMFT

Darlene Lancer, JD, MFT, is a licensed marriage and family therapist and an expert and author on relationships and codependency.

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‘Presence’ Review: Steven Soderbergh Tells a Ghost Story from the Ghost’s POV. It Is Scary? Not Quite. But the Family Demons Lure You In

Soderbergh shoots the film in long roving takes that are supposed to be what the ghost is seeing. But for all the fancy camera moves, the paranormal activity remains rather minimal.

By Owen Gleiberman

Owen Gleiberman

Chief Film Critic

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A still from Presence by Steven Soderbergh, an official selection of the Premieres Program at the 2024 Sundance Film Festival. Courtesy of Sundance Institute.

I exaggerate, though not by much. In “Presence,” we’re indeed taking in the entire movie from the point-of-view of the unseen spirit who has taken over the house. The spirit hovers and observes and always seems to know where the action is; nothing escapes its view. Yet in this case, the cinematographer is Soderbergh himself (shooting under the nom de plume Peter Andrews), and while he has shot many of his own films, going back to “Traffic,” you get the feeling that part of the fun of “Presence” for Soderbergh was literally, through the conceit of the ghost, finding a way to join in the action, to become part of it and fuse with it.

But no. The presence in “Presence” is mostly — merely — a presence , and for long stretches we almost forget it’s there; we’re just watching a shoestring movie shot with a rather nosy and flamboyant visual style. Soderberg stages each scene in a long unbroken take, ending each one of them with a cut to black. All very stylish and percussive. But if he had made a version of this movie without the ghost-as-camera-eye conceit, it would have been more or less the same movie.

Paranormal activity aside, this family has enough ghosts of its own. The mother, Rebecca ( Lucy Liu ), is a tightly wound control freak who runs everything and plays favorites with her kids (she’s the one who decides, in the space of five minutes, to purchase the house, mostly because it’s in the coveted district that will allow the teenage son she dotes on to attend North High School). Rebecca works at an oblique high-finance job in which she’s committed some mysterious illegal action that could get them into hot water. Tyler (Eddy Maday), the son, is sweet on the surface but a mean-boy lout underneath, and his sister, Chloe (Callina Liang), is falling into a depression, though not just because she’s entered the teen-blues tunnel. Her best friend, Nadia, died a few months before of a drug overdose. (She’s the second girl in her school to have died that way.) Chloe is the one member of the family who can sense the ghost’s presence, and Soderbergh doesn’t waste much time revealing why that is. As it turns out, the ghost is there not to haunt but to protect.

The thing about Soderbergh’s “little films” is that they’re brash and inventive and superior to what so many directors could just toss off. But you get the feeling that the main reason they exist is so that Soderbergh can enjoy tinkering with them. That doesn’t sound like a bad philosophy of art or moviemaking, yet he tends to throw these films together in a way that “works” (they carry you along) but that leaves no imprint. It’s as if he were crafting a puzzle by making up pieces on the spot.

“Presence,” in its showy angst, winks at topicality, in the same way that it winks at lot of other things (like things that go bump in the night, or the rise of teenage mental illness, or serial killers). But it’s just flirting with all of them. You want the movie to add up to something, but what it adds up to is another half-diverting, half-satisfying Soderbergh bauble, only this time he’s the ghost in the machine.

Reviewed at Sundance Film Festival, Jan. 19, 2024. Running time: 85 MIN.

  • Production: An Extension 765 production. Producers: Julie M. Anderson, Ken Meyer. Executive producers: David Koepp, Corey Bayes.
  • Crew: Director: Steven Soderbergh. Screenplay: David Koepp. Camera: Peter Andrews. Editor: Mary Ann Bernard. Music: Zack Ryan.
  • With: Lucy Liu, Chris Sullivan, Callina Liang, Julia Fox, Eddy Maday, West Mulholland.

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COMMENTS

  1. Ghosting: What It Means and How to Respond

    Psychology Theories Student Resources Personality Types Trending News Verywell Mind Insights 2023 Verywell Mind 25 Mental Health in the Classroom About Us Editorial Process Meet Our Review Board

  2. Ghosting In Relationships: Everything You Need To Know

    While this term is commonly used in the context of dating , ghosting can also occur between friends, family members, or colleagues. Being ghosted can lead to significant emotional distress, including feelings of rejection, confusion, and self-doubt as it leaves the other person feeling rejected and misguided without any closure or explanation.

  3. The Psychology of Ghosting: Why People Do It and a Better ...

    "Ghosting" is when someone you're dating ends the relationship by cutting off all communication, without any explanation. And we're not talking about not getting a text back after one awkward OKCupid date, but receiving the ultimate silent treatment after several dates, or when you're in a committed relationship.

  4. Ghosting: What It Is, Why It Hurts, and What You Can Do About It

    Ghosting: What It Is, Why It Hurts, and What You Can Do About It Updated Feb 1, 2020 By Susan McQuillan, MS, RDN iStockPhoto.com/wacomka In this Article Ghosting Explained What it Means to Ghost and Be Ghosted? What to Do If You're Ghosted You're in a relationship.

  5. Being Ghosted: Why It Happens and How to Cope

    Verywell Mind / Getty Images Table of Contents Why Do People Ghost? How to Cope What Does Ghosting Say About a Person? Is Ghosting Emotional Abuse? Ghosting occurs when someone you are dating or getting to know disappears without a trace. This could happen at the very beginning of a relationship or in the middle of one, whether in person or online.

  6. What is Ghosting?

    Social Media Glossary Ghosting Ghosting "Ghosting" is a term that is commonly used in dating and social relationships to refer to the sudden and unexplained ending of communication or contact with someone. What does ghosting mean?

  7. What Does Ghosting Mean? And How To Deal With It

    If that someone attempts to reach out, they are met with silence or are even blocked from making further contact [1]. The term itself is based on the 'vanishing' of someone, similar to that of a ghost. Ghosting is most commonly used in romantic relationships. However, it is definitely not limited to them [2].

  8. Ghosting In Dating: Why People Do It, How To Respond + More

    According to clinical psychologist Carla Marie Manly, Ph.D., that lack of closure can trigger feelings of uncertainty, confusion, anxiety, and even reduced self-esteem in the person being ghosted. "In general, ghosting is disrespectful and tends to perpetuate patterns of dismissiveness and avoidance," she says.

  9. Ghosting

    You feel that you are to blame. Should I contact the person who ghosted me? Does a ghoster sometimes reappear? How do I heal from being ghosted? Is ghosting sometimes appropriate? Why It's Easy...

  10. Ghosting: What Is It and How to Move Past Being Ghosted?

    Ghosting, a term that refers to the sudden disappearance of a friend or romantic interest, can happen for many different reasons. We look at the science behind ghosting, and share tips for what to ...

  11. Ghosting (behavior)

    Origin of term The term is used in the context of online exchanges, [13] and became popular by 2015 through many articles on high-profile celebrity relationship dissolutions, [14] [15] and went on to be widely used. It has been the subject of many articles [16] and discussions [17] on dating and relationships in various media.

  12. What Is Ghosting—and Why Is It So Rude?

    In a 2019 YouGov survey, one-third of U.S. adults confessed to doing it in an interpersonal relationship, while a 2021 Indeed survey found that 77% of job seekers reported being ghosted by a...

  13. Unapologetically Gone: The Science Behind Ghosting

    Posted September 15, 2023 | Reviewed by Davia Sills Key points Online dating has swept the globe and instituted many changes in social trends, such as ghosting. Ghosting is thought to be the...

  14. 5 Ways to Know if Someone Is Really Ghosting You

    A short-term, shallow relationship that ends may simply fade out into thin air because it wasn't there in the first place as a serious entity. Perhaps you've had relationships like these whose ...

  15. So, You Got Ghosted

    Pinging weak ties for favors makes your entire interaction seem transactional. Embrace the awkward. Lots of people ghost to avoid awkward exchanges. Instead of feeling haunted by their ...

  16. Ghosting: The Psychology Behind Why It Hurts So Much

    Ghosting is when someone suddenly stops communicating with you without telling you why. It can happen in romantic relationships, friendships, and professional settings. Being ghosted can leave you feeling confused, hurt, and rejected. You may wonder what you did wrong or could have done differently. It's important to remember that being ...

  17. Job Ghosting Is Real: Here's What You Need to Know

    Job ghosting is becoming incredibly common, with one-third of candidates reporting that they were rejected from a job position by never actually getting a response in the first place. This means hiring managers and employers are leaving candidates to wait in agony only to be ghosted after submitting their resume, after the interview, or even ...

  18. What Ghosting Says About You

    Ghosting can have a significant emotional impact on the person who experiences it. This behavior often says more about the ghoster than it does about the person who is being ghosted. Ghosting is generally considered to be an unkind and passive-aggressive way of ending communication or a relationship as it can leave the other party confused, hurt, and questioning what went wrong.

  19. What Does Ghosting Mean?

    Kevin February 24, 2022 Common Questions What is ghosting, and what does it mean if someone ghosts you on a dating app? This article covers the slang meaning of ghosting. Your writing, at its best Compose bold, clear, mistake-free, writing with Grammarly's AI-powered writing assistant Start writing

  20. What Is Soft Ghosting and Why Do People Do It?

    While both soft ghosting and breadcrumbing are behaviors that involve reduced or inconsistent communication, they have slightly different dynamics and intentions. Breadcrumbing is a behavior where someone gives intermittent and sporadic attention to keep the other person interested without any intention of forming a meaningful relationship.

  21. 7 Essential Psychological Truths About Ghosting

    Ghosting is even more hurtful to people who have low self-esteem in the first place. If what one person believed was a substantial relationship ends suddenly — without even the effort it would ...

  22. What Does Ghosting Mean?

    Ghosting refers to abruptly cutting off contact with someone, usually a romantic partner, without any explanation or warning. It's like disappearing into thin air, leaving the other person confused and wondering what happened. Here are some key points to consider:

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  26. Were You Ghosted? Learn Why—and How to Respond When It Happens

    Realize that you can't figure out the ghost's motives in your head. Let go of obsessive thoughts, and allow yourself to feel both sadness and anger, without falling into shame. Give yourself ...

  27. 'Presence' Review: Soderbergh Tells a Ghost Story from the ...

    The ghost in "Presence" likes to watch, but after a while it also does a few things, like lifting books and carrying them over to a desk (its lofting of a paperback appears to have been ...

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