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Ocean Tramp is a 66 feet ketch rigged sailboat, with 5 cabins. She very comfortably can carry 8 guests plus three crew members and one scientist. She is a very fast sailboat thanks to her long length, making for a short passage the sailing across the Drake. She is ideal for photographers, hikers, divers, scientists and all sort of expeditions that need a large capacity vessel with plenty of storage as well as the needed comfort when living on a sailboat for longer periods of time.  Scroll down for a video tour of the inside.

She has a broadband 4G radar, AIS, 3 VHFs, SSB Radio, 3 GPS, 2 echo sounders, forward looking sonar, autopilot, media drive for watching movies, onboard PC with WiFi internal net for sharing files, public wireless  printer and scanner,  chart plotter, Satellite Iridium Phone with email and weather download capabilities, a large separate kitchen  and a large saloon for 12 guests. She carries all the safety equipment required, including Epirb beacon, 2 SARTs, a linethrowing device,  2 liferafts, flares, Handheld VHFs, SOLAS lifejackets, inflatable lifejackets, Full Co2 engine room firefighting system, etc.  She is a very sturdy and comfortable boat with huge forward and aft decks for transporting equipment, samples, and making your life easier when  dealing with equipment or diving bottles and compressor- we are very happy with her!

Passengers: 8

Staff & crew: 4

Length: 26.5 meters

Breadth: 7.1 meters

Draft: 3.4 meters

Ice Class: Strengthened steel hull, aluminium superstructure

Engine: BergenDiesel 525 bhp @ 312 rpm, variable pitch propeller / Ulstein 100 bhp variable pitch bowthruster

Tonnage: 146 tons (register)/230 tons (displacement)

Speed: 11 knots max/9 knots cruising speed

Accomodation Details

Shackleton suite.

1-Shackleton Cabin.JPG

Mermaid Cabin

Cabin 2 -Mermaid.JPG

Forward Cabin

Cabin 3 Forward Cabin.JPG

Antarctica 2021/22 Departures

2021/12/21-2022/1/3

From $15,500

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ocean tramp sailboat

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Trump Rants About Sharks, and Everyone Just Pretends It’s Normal

H ours before meeting with his probation officer about his recent felony convictions, a leading candidate for U.S. president went on a bizarre rant about sharks.

Sharks, Donald Trump claimed , were attacking more frequently than usual ( not true ) and posed a newfound risk because boats were being required to use batteries (not true), which would cause them to sink because they were too heavy (really, really not true—the world’s heaviest cruise ship, the Icon of the Seas, managed to stay afloat because of the laws of physics despite weighing more than 550 million pounds).

Trump, undeterred by truth or science, invoked his intellectual credentials by mentioning his “relationship to MIT.” (Trump’s uncle was a professor at the university, pioneering rotational radiation therapy, which seems a somewhat tenuous connection for conferring shark- or battery-related expertise to his nephew.) If Trump had been able to ask his uncle about the risks of being electrocuted by a boat battery because, as Trump put it, “there’s a lot of electric current coming through that water,” perhaps the professor would have informed him that high-capacity batteries would rapidly discharge in seawater and pose minuscule risk to humans because the water conducts electricity far better than human bodies do.

Sharks appear to have troubled Trump’s mind for years. On July 4, 2013, Trump twice tweeted about them, saying, “Sorry folks, I’m just not a fan of sharks—and don’t worry, they will be around long after we are gone.” Two minutes later, he followed that nugget of wisdom with: “Sharks are last on my list—other than perhaps the losers and haters of the World!”

[ McKay Coppins: Why attacks on Trump’s mental acuity don’t land ]

These deranged rants are tempting to laugh off. They’re par for the course. Trump is Trump. But Trump may also soon be the president of the United States. Imagine the response if Joe Biden had made the same rambling remarks, word for word. Consider this excerpt:

“I say, ‘What would happen if the boat sank from its weight and you’re in the boat and you have this tremendously powerful battery and the battery’s underwater, and there’s a shark that’s approximately 10 yards over there?’ By the way, a lot of shark attacks lately. Do you notice that? A lot of shark … I watched some guys justifying it today: ‘Well, they weren’t really that angry. They bit off the young lady’s leg because of the fact that they were not hungry, but they misunderstood who she was.’ These people are crazy.”

Coming from Biden, that exact statement might have prompted calls from across the political spectrum for him to drop out of the race. From Trump, it was a blip that barely registered. I’ve previously called this dynamic “the banality of crazy” : Trump’s ludicrous statements are ignored precisely because they’re so routine—and routine occurrences don’t drive the news. They are the proverbial “dog bites man” stories that get ignored by the press. Except that even this truism breaks down when it comes to the asymmetry between coverage of Trump and Biden: Based on Google News tallies, the news story about Biden’s dog biting a Secret Service agent spurred far more press coverage than Trump saying that he would order shoplifters to be shot without a trial if he became president.

[ Brian Klaas: Trump floats the idea of executing Joint Chiefs Chairman Milley ]

Still, Trump appears to be benefiting from the sheer superfluity of crazy. At rallies, the former president makes stream-of-consciousness statements that would raise questions about the mental acuity of anyone who said them at, say, the tail end of a night at a neighborhood bar, but that somehow don’t generate the same level of concern within the press or the Republican Party when Trump says them in front of a cheering crowd. By contrast, when Biden makes a gaffe—mixing up a name or a date rather than, for example, suggesting that boats sink because they’re heavy—questions arise about his mental fitness to be president. A president who occasionally misspeaks is far less worrying than one who purveys delusional fantasies and conspiracy theories. Biden may gaffe, but he lives in reality; Trump often doesn’t.

Today, a prominent New York Times columnist called on one of the two candidates to drop out . Astonishingly, it wasn’t the authoritarian felon who inspired a violent mob to attack the Capitol, tried to overturn a democratic election, has been banned from doing business in New York due to fraud—and yet again showcased his loose grip on reality by ranting about sharks.

Trump Rants About Sharks, and Everyone Just Pretends It’s Normal

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Sailing to Antarctica: An Interview with Federico Guerrero

March 25, 2021 by Sarah Scott Leave a Comment

One of the things that I like most about my job is having the opportunity to meet interesting people from around the world. I’m lucky enough that some of these people have become close friends.

This is one of those cases. I met Federico a six years ago at a “Thanksgiving ” dinner here in Ushuaia, thanks to his proactive wife Laura, who is constantly networking and organizing dinners.

Below you will find a piece of the interview that he and I had during the 2020 quarantine.

Federico Guerrero grew up four blocks from the beach, and at age 12 he went to sailing school with his dad. From there, the family explored the coast of Argentina and Brazil in small sailboats. Fede went to university at the National Maritime College in Argentina and holds a Master’s unlimited license. He has worked on nearly all of the worlds’ oceans on many vessels including seismic research vessels, fishing vessels, supply ships, and cargo vessels.

Federico Gerrero

FreeStyle : How did you start guiding trips to Antarctica? How many trips have you done?

Fede: It all started in 2013 when I sailed with my wife to Antarctica for the first time on a sailboat that I built, as a dream project. This trip to Antarctica was also our honeymoon! We realized we loved Antarctica and that one day we wanted to start a business taking tourists and scientists to Antarctica on small  boats. That project started taking shape in 2014 when a bigger and more suitable sailboat suddenly came up for sale. So, I quit my job at the time in a multinational company, bought the boat and created the company called Quixote Expeditions – the name is in honor to my previous sailboat named Quijote (Quixote), which is in honor of Don Quixote, a silly nit-wit who was wandering around looking for adventures and having funny stories to tell. Our first commercial trip to Antarctica on the SY Ocean Tramp was in January 2016. During the summer season 2016/17 we made two voyages with tourists. In the season 2017/18 we made 4 voyages and we introduced the Fly-cruise idea for small boats, so out the of 4 voyages, only the first and last were sailing across the Drake, and the two trips in between were Flying both ways . This idea was very well received, and for the season 2018/19 we added a second little vessel to our fleet, the Hans Hansson, and we added more trips, so we made 6 trips on Ocean Tramp and 4 trips on Hans Hansson, this also meant increasing our team as Ocean Tramp now had her own crew, and I was the skipper on Hans Hansson. This past season 2019/20 we increased to more trips and we made 7 trips on Ocean Tramp and 5 trips on Hans Hansson, where we had crew on both vessels and I moved to Shore Support, Logistics, etc…

FreeStyle:  What is it like to cross the Drake Passage in a sailing boat?

Fede : The Drake passage has rough seas no matter on which boat you cross it. The good news is that when you are small you always are more cautious, so we actually always look very closely at the weather forecast before we set sail to cross the Drake passage, as opposed to bigger vessels that cross no matter what. The other good news is that we do fly cruise, so you only need to cross the Drake once, and you return flying across the Drake which is done in just 2 hours! Finally, the last good news is that our trips are long, so if we have to wait a day or two for good weather across the Drake, we can make it without losing much time down in Antarctica!

FreeStyle:  Why should passengers consider traveling to Antarctica in small yachts?

Fede:  Antarctica is a great place to be explored by small yachts!. It’s like traveling on a bicycle where you get to see so many details, smells, sensations, feelings! Plus, small yachts anchor very close to shore, so you are surrounded by glaciers and wildlife all the time. The fact that we are maximum 7 passengers on Ocean Tramp makes a huge difference in the experience that you get. If you want to experience an intimate exploratory trip, where you get to choose along with your crew mates the destination and the plan for each day, then a small yacht is the way to go.

FreeStyle:  Is previous knowledge required to join a trip in a sailing boat?

Fede: Passengers joining a yacht don’t need any previous knowledge of sailing, as we have a crew who takes cares of every aspect of sailing. You need to be physically fit and be in full control of your body and have average balance. If you can walk one mile without losing your breath, if you can climb a 2 meters /6 feet vertical ladder, if you can be standing on a bus holding with only one hand, if you can disembark on a beach from a little inflatable boat, then you are probably good to come! Everyone coming with us need to fill out an online personal and medical form, which has to be reviewed and signed by a doctor. Ah, by the way, if you do want to help sailing the boat, steering, handling lines, our crew will welcome you and teach you as much as you want to learn and participate!

FreeStyle: What’s life like onboard the yacht?

Fede: Life onboard is a bit like going to a summer camp -there are activities all the time, although only if you want – if you prefer to stay on deck just absorbing the beauty, taking pictures, relaxing, or whatever, that’s totally fine. If you want to go on a hike, go exploring in kayaks, take a zodiac tour, help the onboard crew steering the boat, talk to our Guest Scientist onboard, etc, that’s also very good! It’s also like those books “choose your own adventure”, as we made the day to day plan around the table with the Captain, based on weather and passengers wishes.

FreeStyle:  Any nice anecdote you could share?

Fede:  On this one trip we arrived to Antarctica and our first destination was Yankee Harbour. We landed with all our passengers and it was an amazing day, blue sky, calm, the ground was all white with snow and the place was full of life -penguins everywhere, seals, birds, it was just amazing! We were standing there watching all happening when this woman came to us crying – she hugs us both and said “thanks for bringing me here”.

FreeStyle: Favorite place in Antarctica?

Fede:  One of my favorites places in the West Antarctic Peninsula is Cuverville Island – if all conditions are good, which happens often, it’s just an amazing place full of activity of all sorts, happening all at the same time -where we anchor is on a protected basin surrounded by land and icebergs and you see penguins on shore, seals swimming around the boat, small icebergs passing by, penguins jumping here and there, icebergs moving, rolling, changing shapes, you hear the sound of distant glaciers carving -every direction you watch something is going on! You can just sit on deck with a cup of coffee and see it all happening! It’s like been inside a giant zoo where you are part of it!.

FreeStyle:  Why do travellers enjoy sailing to Antarctica?

Fede:  With no doubt they like the most the amazing flexibility that a small yacht offers. We make our plan day to day based on the weather forecast and on what our guests want to see and do. Everyday the Captain will lay a map down on the table and show the potential next places to go, and every one will express their interest and wishes.

FreeStyle: Any message for travellers who are thinking in sailing to Antarctica?

Fede:  If you want to explore Antarctica choosing your own adventure every day and be part of it, and feel like you are a real member of an Expedition Team, come with us!

FreeStyle:  Any other piece of advice for future travellers?

Fede:  No matter what way you choose to visit Antarctica with, be very flexible and open, and let things happen in whatever order Antarctica present it to you -whatever Antarctica throws at you, take it on that very moment, don’t wait for the “second time” -it might never come. Antarctica is usually the last destination

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Watch CBS News

Killer whales sink yacht after 45-minute attack, Polish tour company says

By Emily Mae Czachor

November 6, 2023 / 9:58 AM EST / CBS News

A group of orcas managed to sink a yacht off the coast of Morocco last week, after its 45-minute attack on the vessel caused irreparable damage, a Polish tour company said.

The incident happened Tuesday, Oct. 31, as a crew with the boat touring group sailed through the Strait of Gibraltar. The narrow waterway bridges the Mediterranean Sea and the Atlantic Ocean, which separates the southern tip of Europe from northern Africa. 

A pod of orcas, colloquially called killer whales, approached the yacht and "hit the steering fin for 45 minutes, causing major damage and leakage," the tour agency Morskie Mile, which is based in Warsaw and operated the yacht, wrote on  Facebook in a translated post.

Although its captain and crew were assisted by a search-and-rescue team as well as the Moroccan Navy, the yacht could not be salvaged. It sank near the entrance to the port of Tanger-Med, a major complex of ports some 30 miles northeast of Tangier along the Strait of Gibraltar. None of the crew members were harmed, said the Polish tour agency, adding that those on board the sunken yacht were already safe and in Spain by the time their Facebook post went live. 

"This yacht was the most wonderful thing in maritime sailing for all of us. Longtime friendships formed on board," wrote Morskie Mile. The company said it was involved in other upcoming cruises in the Canary Islands and would work to make sure those boat trips went ahead as planned.

morskie-mil.jpg

Last week's incident in the Strait of Gibraltar was not the first of its kind. Reported attacks by killer whales that seem to be trying deliberately to capsize boats off the coast of Spain and Portugal have more than tripled over the last two years, according to data  released in the spring by the research group GTOA, which studies orcas around Gibraltar.

"Nobody knows why this is happening," Andrew W. Trites, professor and director of Marine Mammal Research at the University of British Columbia, told CBS News in May. "My idea, or what anyone would give you, is informed speculation. It is a total mystery, unprecedented." 

GTOA recorded 52 maritime interactions with orcas between the Strait of Gibraltar and Galicia, a coastal province in northwestern Spain, between July and November 2020. The incidents picked up in the years that followed, with 197 interactions recorded in 2021 and 207 recorded in 2022, GTOA said, noting that the interactions mainly affected sailboats. 

Then, in June of this year, one of two sailing teams involved in an international race around the world reported a frightening confrontation involving multiple orcas as they traveled through the Atlantic Ocean to the west of Gibraltar. The teams, which were competing in The Ocean Race, said the orcas did not damage their boats or harm crews, but recalled the sea creatures pushing up against and, in one instance, ramming into one of the boats. The orcas also nudged and bit the rudders, one crew member said.

Caitlin O'Kane and Kerry Breen contributed to this report.

Emily Mae Czachor is a reporter and news editor at CBSNews.com. She covers breaking news, often focusing on crime and extreme weather. Emily Mae has previously written for outlets including the Los Angeles Times, BuzzFeed and Newsweek.

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Ocean Medicine Foundation 3351 El Camino Real Suite 200 Atherton, CA 94027-3802 (650) 328-5222

Contact Us | About Us | Islands

Ocean Medicine Foundation

The Ocean Medicine Foundation

The Ocean Medicine Foundation, a non-profit organization, is working to improve the health and healthcare of children and adults on islands throughout the world and prevent global spread of infectious disease and epidemics.

Bring the most up-to-date medical information to physicians and public health workers on developing island nations.

Provide the training and training materials required to use these tools effectively.

Deal with diseases before they become worldwide threats by providing current, evidence-based information about prevention, diagnosis, treatment and containment.

Ocean Medicine Foundation Overview

The Ocean Medicine Foundation programs provide island healthcare professionals with access to current evidence-based medical information and resources, and the training on how to use these tools effectively. The result is a significant improvement in the health and healthcare of children and adults in developing island nations. Because islands frequently are stepping stones in the global spread of infectious disease and epidemics, improving the health of island residents is a critical global health issue.

The Challenge: Prohibitive costs prevent access to needed medical information

Island residents have lower standards of living, shorter life expectancies, and more chronic illnesses than their counterparts in mainland countries. Infectious diseases such as malaria, dengue, AIDS and parasitic infections abound, and epidemics spread rapidly in these small isolated populations, and from these islands to mainland nations. Most island medical providers lack access to current medical information because of the prohibitive cost of bringing this information to these isolated islands, which significantly compounds the problem. Island physicians are well trained, but their ability to treat patients successfully is jeopardized by having medical information that is years out of date.

Our Solution: Provide evidence-based medical databases in electronic format

The Ocean Medicine Foundation provides reliable, current medical information about prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and containment in an electronic format, which can be accessed on state-of-the art mobile technology, anywhere island nation physicians deliver care. When purchased, these medical databases can cost thousands of dollars. We’ve been very fortunate that the creators of several of these databases, like Epocrates and the Medical Letter have donated the use of these tools for our island sites. Financial contributions from our donors have enabled the Foundation also to provide hospital-wide access for physicians to the most essential medical resource, UpToDate, as well the necessary training and support to effectively use these devices and databases. The foundation is partnered with a network of medical schools, specialists, and scientists across the United States, who provide critical information and medical expertise to island health professionals. We collaborate with organizations that focus on enhancing local healthcare capacity, such as the World Health organization (WHO), the Center for Disease Control (CDC), and the Secretariat of the Pacific Community (SPC).

Ongoing Support: Training and professional development is critical

Technology is improving continually and the medical knowledge base constantly is changing and growing. Regular in-person or Skype-based training sessions are crucial to supporting physicians’ effective use of these medical databases and devices in their daily practice of medicine. We provide such training directly, as well as training on-island “super users” who can train and support others in turn, when questions or problems arise.

Where We Work: Developing island nations in the Pacific

The Ocean Medicine Foundation currently works on numerous islands throughout the Pacific.

Andrew Newman, M.D., F.C.C.P. is the Chairman and Managing Director of the Ocean Medicine Foundation. Dr. Newman also serves as Chairman Emeritus of Stanford University's Health Information Management Committee, overseeing the application of computers in clinical activity at Stanford Hospital. In his clinical practice in Atherton, CA, Dr. Newman specializes in pulmonary diseases, undersea, and sports medicine.

Sunny Chin, M.Sc. is the Director of Pacific Island Health Initiatives with the Ocean Medicine Foundation. He holds a Master of Science in public health from Harvard University, School of Public Health and also is a graduate of UVM with a degree in psychology. His research interests focus on how new innovative technologies can empower medical professionals, enhance patient care, and reduce medical costs.

Annette Adler, M.A., M.B.A., Director of Strategic Initiatives. She holds a Masters in Anthropology (ABD in the PhD program) and a Master in Business Administration from Stanford University. Her research interests include exploring how digital technologies support education and collaboration over long distances and informatics for advanced medical, clinical and biological research applications.

Visit Dr. Andrew Newman's Website

The Ocean Medicine Foundation currently works on numerous developing island nations throughout the Pacific, including the following:

Islands we work with throughout the pacific

American Samoa Confederation of the Northern Marianas Islands (CNMI) Saipan

Fiji Federated States of Micronesia Chuuk Kosrae Pohnpei Yap

Marshall Islands Ebeye Majuro

3351 El Camino Real, Suite 200 Atherton, CA 94027-3802 Email: [email protected]

(650) 328-5222

(650) 324-4374

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Discover Antarctica Up Close:

Intimate adventures in small groups.

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Explore Antarctica with Us!

Enjoy real quality time in Antarctica with Quixote Expeditions. 

Experience true small boat expedition ships with never more than 12 passengers.

Fly across the Drake Passage

Fly across the Drake Passage for a smoother and faster journey to this breathtaking destination. Enjoy two full weeks in Antarctica (weather permitting).

Logistic Support

Quixote Expeditions' vessels provide fundamental logistical support for the for scientific and film expeditions.

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We are proud to partner with and work alongside various photographers, tour operators, and scientific institutions.

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Sail in & fly out - ocean tramp, fly in & out - hans hansson, fly in & out - ocean tramp, falkland / malvinas, full charter our yatchs.

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Book your bunk on a regular trip!

Join our antarctica trips, is this trip for me.

This is a great trip for photographers, especially those looking to get the perfect shot. Our size offers us incredible flexibility. We can help you get some great shots and we can take advantage of the weather and the light!

Don’t worry – we have put together a list of exactly what you need to bring – check it out  here .  If you have winter clothes, most of it you will already have.  A must have are some Arctic Muck boots – insulated rubber boots.  They are amazing.

Everyone is a little different, but we highly recommend bringing seasickness pills with you. if you are on a Drake Passage trip – it is open water and the vessel will move. For those flying across the Drake, there may at timesm still be some movement, so we do reccomend brining some medication. We recommend having a chat with your doctor and bringing seasickness pills with you.

When we are in Antarctica Ocean Tramp will act like a base camp. Some days we will travel other days we will stay put. Once we are anchored we will launch the zodiac to explore. Sometimes we will cruise around the in the zodiac exploring the area, other times we will use the zodiac to bring us to shore. Sometime on shore we will be able to freely move around, explore and hike, other times we may be limited due to the wildlife and limiting our impact on them. We also bring kayaks and can use them to explore at eye level.

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Video updates on first penguin encounter... Expectations and reality! View...

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A multi day round up of Christmas time We love...

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Between sharks and shocks: Answering Trump’s unanswered question

The former president’s riff on sea life and electric boats confused a lot of people. Allow us to clarify.

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“So we have a country that's in trouble,” Donald Trump began .

A lot of Trump’s stories begin similarly, so those in the audience at his Las Vegas rally this weekend would be forgiven for not predicting the multiple tangents the former president was about to take. Even when his next sentence narrowed it down — “We’re going to end the mandate on electric one day” — no one could have guessed what the next 2½ minutes would bring.

Sharks. MIT. Electrocution. And, of course, a guy who called Trump “sir.”

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It is possible that the sheer weirdness of this story has already led to your seeing it. Transcripts of Trump's 500-plus-word riff spread over social media, as people tried to parse it like the final exam of a fifth-grade English class. If you didn't see it, allow me to offer an abridged version.

The story began with Trump describing a conversation with a boat manufacturer in South Carolina. (This was the person who purportedly referred to him as “sir.”) Trump offered more familiarity with boats than his audience — again, in the desert city of Las Vegas — might have possessed, with casual references to vessel lengths and motor manufacturers. The point, though, was that even this estimable industry had been afflicted by calls to reduce fossil fuel consumption.

According to Trump’s telling, the manufacturer was being asked to make only electric boats but that such boats 1) were too heavy to float, 2) had to be slowly driven out to sea, which took hours and 3) then had so little charge left that you could only be out for 10 minutes. The first point is obviously false, given that there are lots of floating electric vessels — including in the U.S. Navy — so there’s no reason to assume that the rest would be true, either.

Then came Trump's question.

“So I said, ‘Let me ask you a question,’” Trump explained. “And he said, ‘Nobody ever asks this question,’ and it must because of MIT, my relationship to MIT. Very smart.”

Trump’s relationship to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology is that he had an uncle who taught there. And as everyone knows, you can tell a lot about a person’s capabilities from what their parents’ siblings do for a living. But back to the question.

“I say, ‘What would happen if the boat sank from its weight and you’re in the boat, and you have this tremendously powerful battery, and the battery’s now underwater, and there’s a shark that’s approximately 10 yards over there?’” Trump said.

Then Trump went on a tangent about sharks and shark attacks. In the abstract, this was just odd, given that — just as a reminder! — this was Trump trying to convince a lot of Nevadans to vote for him for president. But his aversion to sharks is well-established — and, in fact, overlaps with his recent criminal conviction in Manhattan.

The criminal trial in New York centered on Stormy Daniels, the adult-film actress who claimed to have had a sexual encounter with Trump in 2006 — he denies they had sex — and the hush money payment made to her by Trump’s attorney before the 2016 election. In a 2011 interview with In Touch Weekly that was published after the details of the alleged encounter between Trump and Daniels were made public in 2018, she recounted his disdain for sharks. Daniels explained that one of their encounters overlapped with the Discovery Channel’s “Shark Week” programming. As the two sat in Trump’s hotel room, he volunteered how much he hated sharks and wished they all would die. That his central concern related to a sinking boat would be sharks certainly bolsters the idea that Daniels was telling the truth.

In this case, that concern was offered as a counterpoint to the threat from the sinking vessel.

“Do I get electrocuted if the boat is sinking, water goes over the battery, the boat is sinking?” Trump says he asked the man. “Do I stay on top of the boat and get electrocuted, or do I jump over by the shark and not get electrocuted?”

The boat manufacturer, he said, didn't know the answer. But lots of other people do: The risk of electrocution is extremely low, so stay on the boat.

There are lots of ways to think about this. The first, and perhaps most obvious, is that people who actually make electric boats (unlike this possibly apocryphal guy from South Carolina) understand that electricity and water don’t mix that well and, as such, build their vessels to minimize that risk.

When Trump offered a similar question of shocks vs. sharks a few months ago, the site Heatmap spoke with boat manufacturers who “said they meet a waterproofing standard that is either at, or just below, what is required for a submarine .” Arc Boat Company has an explanation about using electricity in a boat on its website, noting that its “battery packs are completely watertight.”

“We use leak detection sensors inside of the packs — something you don’t typically see in electric cars — so that in the unlikely event that water is present, we’ll know about it immediately and can issue an appropriate warning,” the site explains. Often, companies selling products to the general public consider the risk that their products might kill people before bringing those products to market.

It is also not the case that an electrical charge in the water spreads everywhere at the same strength indefinitely. When lightning strikes the ocean, it is not the case that every fish dies or that every person swimming on every coast is fried. The fish survive in part because the charge is primarily at the surface , so the analogy here isn't perfect. But being at a distance from the charge matters regardless of the source of the charge.

I emailed the Batten College of Engineering and Technology at Old Dominion University to get the input of experts on the question of the deadly boat battery. Students from the college study electric propulsion and placed third in an electric boat competition last summer.

A statement provided by the university to The Washington Post, though, was a little light on physics in favor of pop culture: Remember what happened in the movie “Titanic?”

“Near the movie’s end, before the remainder of the lights go out, they show sailors flipping off power switches until the water reaches an open switch, creating a short circuit that electrocutes the sailor near the switch,” the statement read. “The movie shows many other cases of short circuits that do not electrocute people. If a person floating in water is not too close to the power source, [he] is unlikely to be electrocuted, and the power source will stop serving as a battery once it is fried.”

Director James Cameron's reputation for accuracy apparently withstands the scrutiny of actual engineers.

But you get the point. If Trump is sitting near that battery on the sinking ship and isn't confident that the protections installed by the boat manufacturer will hold, he could simply swim away from the battery in the opposite direction of the shark, thereby avoiding both fates. At least for a moment.

Trump’s solution, by the way, was to be electrocuted, thus avoiding being gobbled up by the shark. But unfortunately for him and his fears, he probably wouldn’t be electrocuted and would, instead, be eaten.

With that, you have one more bit of information that can inform your presidential vote this November, as Trump intended.

Election 2024

Get the latest news on the 2024 election from our reporters on the campaign trail and in Washington.

Who is running?: President Biden and Donald Trump secured their parties’ nominations for the presidency . Here’s how we ended up with a Trump-Biden rematch .

Presidential debates: Biden and Trump agreed to a June 27 debate on CNN and a Sept. 10 debate broadcast by ABC News.

Key dates and events: From January to June, voters in all states and U.S. territories will pick their party’s nominee for president ahead of the summer conventions. Here are key dates and events on the 2024 election calendar .

Abortion and the election: Voters in about a dozen states could decide the fate of abortion rights with constitutional amendments on the ballot in a pivotal election year. Biden supports legal access to abortion , and he has encouraged Congress to pass a law that would codify abortion rights nationwide. After months of mixed signals about his position, Trump said the issue should be left to states . Here’s how Biden’s and Trump’s abortion stances have shifted over the years.

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VIDEO

  1. Quixote Expeditions, Fjords and Antarctica

  2. Let's cross an OCEAN! 17 days just water around us

  3. Sailing in Antarctica on Ocean Tramp

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  29. Between sharks and shocks: Answering Trump's unanswered question

    A shark swims off the Massachusetts coast of Cape Cod in August 2021. (Phil Marcelo/AP) "So we have a country that's in trouble," Donald Trump began. A lot of Trump's stories begin similarly ...